Features: From the smallest lime to the largest grapefruit, this sleek brushed stainless steel citrus juicer gets out more juice more efficiently. An adjustable auto-reversing reamer features “custom” pulp control settings, and the unique Final-Spin feature maximizes the amount of juice from each piece of fruit. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a breeze. Features: Adjustable reamer with 3 pulp control settings—low, medium, high Auto-reversing universal juicer cone for more efficient juicing Final-Spin feature extracts more juice from pulp Extra-long Snap-Up spout accommodates more glasses and prevents dripping Cover activates Final-Spin feature and protects against dust Brushed stainless steel design Easy-clean dishwasher-safe parts Convenient cord storage Limited 3-year warranty BPA Free
Although I don’t claim to be a healthy-living enthusiast, I do regularly enjoy grassy green juices and spicy beet turmeric shots myself. I’ve personally owned a few different juicers over the years—including long-term testing our picks for the past three years—and I also have a lot of experience working with the commercial Champion juicer in restaurant kitchens.
We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.
Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.

The high RPM associated with centrifugal juicers also generates a lot of foam which drives more oxygen bubbles into the juice, resulting in the lower shelf life of the juice. Juice extracted by centrifugal juicers spoil rather quickly due to the oxygen-laden foam and must be consumed immediately. With this, you cannot hope to make a bulk of juice and store for later.
We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
If water is overflowing, the water reservoir is overfilled. There is a drain hole in the rear of the coffeemaker to prevent overfilling. If the overflow is coffee, you may have used more than one tablespoon of coffee per cup of water or not fully seated either the brew basket and/or the carafe underneath the brew basket. Make sure you have correctly aligned the brew basket and the carafe and are using the correct amount of coffee grounds. Overflowing may happen more frequently with decaffeinated, flavored and finely-ground coffee. Overflowing may occur if the paper filter collapses inside the brew basket. Use a good quality paper filter.

Easy to clean: We’ve found that all juicers have one thing in common—they’re a bit of a pain to clean. The parts aren’t dishwasher safe, so you have to clean the components by hand. And they have a lot of small nooks and crannies that can trap gunk. We looked for vertical juicers that come with specialized brushes to make cleaning easier, and considered horizontal models, like those from Omega, that are a little simpler to clean because the juicing screens aren’t as big.
And the Tribest Slowstar doesn’t just juice. It also comes with a “homogenizing” mincer attachment that grinds without extracting liquid—useful for making sorbets, nut butters, and more. I haven’t used the machine for anything other than making juice, so I can’t attest to its food-chopping and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making abilities, but you can see it in action in this DiscountJuicers.com video. The separate bowl attachment fits onto the base, using the auger to pulverize the food and push it through a large chute without a screen.

If a significant portion of your calories are going to come from juice each day, mix up your produce. Go with veggie-heavy juices, using just a bit of fruit for sweetness. Alternate types of produce, and try something entirely new periodically. Farmers markets and ethnic grocery stores are great spots to find fruits and vegetables you’ve never tasted before.

Though some buyers have complained about fussy assembly, I didn’t have any trouble taking the VSJ843 apart or putting it back together. None of the parts were fidgety or stuck to each other; everything locked into place and unlatched easily. The machine comes with a 15-year warranty on the motor and parts, which means you can juice with confidence for a very long time.
Yes, the Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fast and popular. But this centrifugal juicer paled in comparison with the slow juicers we tested. The yields were low and it was the least effective at juicing greens. In my one-bedroom apartment, you can’t hear the television in the living room when a Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fired up in the kitchen. It also has only a one-year warranty.
To open a can, push front of cutting assembly backwards to lift the blade. Make sure the flip-up magnet is in the up position. Tilt top of can in to position cutting blade inside rim of can. Push down top of cutting assembly to start the cutting action. To remove the can, hold the can and push backwards on front of cutting assembly again. To remove the cutting assembly for washing, twist release button on front of can opener clockwise and lift out cutting assembly. Wash, rinse, and dry thoroughly. If you want to wash the cutting assembly in the dishwasher, remove flip-up magnet first by grasping one side near hinge and pulling out slightly until magnet releases from hinge. To replace cutting assembly, place it in position and firmly press both sides until it snaps into place.

This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.
John Kohler and Matt Shook both recommended that we include a few different vertical single-auger juicers to test. All of the vertical and horizontal single-auger models we brought in to test promised low speeds, minimal oxidation, and high juice yields. We also brought in two centrifugal-style juicers to compare yield and quality. These didn’t do well in our tests and ultimately we recommend only single-auger juicers.
Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
Thanks to its game-changing self-feeding hopper, this pretty Hurom H-AI Slow Juicer chops and pushes down fruits and vegetables for you. In addition to being less work than other juicers on the market, the Hurom's automatic operation makes it harder to clog or overfeed the hopper. But because it's pricey, this luxe model's an investment we would recommend for true juice enthusiasts. Available in rose gold, slate blue, or silver.

Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.


The benefits of juicing are clear, and the staggering number of juicers sold on Amazon are a testament to the rising popularity of juicing. If you’re looking for a quality juicer, to really unlock all the micronutrients locked away in fruits and vegetables, you need to be prepared to pay anywhere from $200 to $400. There are super powerful and efficient juicers such as the Super Angel Juicers which retail close to $1000—but those are usually popular only among health professionals and nutritionists. With your hard earned money on the line, you’ll want to be sure that you really pay attention to the features of the different juicers your comparing. There are some major differences such as masticating juicers vs. centrifugal juicers, but there are also minor differences such as locking mechanisms and pulp ejection systems. Below you’ll find listed several of the most important features to pay attention to on any juicer before you buy it.

A passionate writer and a blogger, a person who is a movie junkie and a crazy lover of pets of any size and kind. The Ocean combined with a warm breeze what really inspires and makes her smile. She loves writing just about everything that help people overcome an obstacle: marketing strategies, technological innovations, healthy living and human rights, freedom of opinions and much more…
If you're serious about juicing, it's best to get a juicer that fits nicely on your kitchen counter so you can leave it out rather than having to haul it out of a cupboard. That means paying close attention to the dimensions and even the length of the electrical cord. You don't want to buy a juicer that looks great in your kitchen but doesn't have a cord that reaches the outlet.

In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.

While most popular juicers on the market today are centrifugal juicers due to their ease-of-use and the fact that they are more commonly used an example of what a juicer is, the other two types do have their advantages over the popular guy. This is especially true if you want to do more with your juicer other than extracting juice from fruits and vegetables.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
The Omega J8006 Nutrition Center Juicer is a masticating type of press juicer which works at slow speeds (only 80 RPM) to efficiently extract juice from all kinds of products without generating heat and foam. The juice yield is high, is of superior quality and boasts of a shelf life of up to 72 hours. This juicer works quietly and is backed up by a 15-year warranty for your peace of mind. What’s more, it performs multiple functions as a nut butter and pasta making machine. The price may be limiting but its efficiency lets you save on produce over time. If you’re after high-quality juice, we rate this as the best masticating juicer on the market.
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one!
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