Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.
All plastic parts (except for the motor base) remove for easy cleanup in the dishwasher. To clean the cutter/strainer, run water over the strainer basket and brush off excess fiber buildup or pulp. The pulp bin container can be emptied by turning the extractor OFF and removing it from the unit. For easy cleanup, place a plastic grocery bag in the pulp bin container to collect the pulp and once juicing is complete, simply discard. 

Are you looking for a quick daily juice to take on your commute or something packed with all kinds of unusual ingredients to enjoy on a luxurious weekend morning? To make the most out of your juicer, get a head start by researching recipes involving your favorite ingredients. There are lots of online guides for beginners. The last thing you want to do is purchase a juicer and have it gather dust because you got sick of straight carrot juice.
When you feed the machine with fruits and veggies, it will first crush and slice them all up using its pocket recesses. Sinewy stuff like cabbage leaves or celery will be automatically cut short by the cutting teeth, a feature missing on many other juicers. This significantly reduces clogging and tangling (but if that ever happens, there’s a Reverse button to release the culprit).
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We spent 96 hours juicing fruits and vegetables, both hard and soft, and attempted to make nut milks. In the end, our favorite juicer was the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, a powerful machine that produces excellent juice and nut milk. It leaves behind only a little pulp and less froth than any of the other juicers we tested. In addition, it has a big food chute.


Breville’s top of the line commercial-grade centrifugal juicer doesn’t disappoint. Boasting a super strong and fast 1000-watt motor with 2 speed controls this machine plows through piles of fruits and vegetables in a flash and gets highly rated juicer reviews. The variable speed options give you more control–Breville recommends using the high speed setting (13,000 RPM) for hard fruits and vegetables and low setting (6,500 RPM) for softer fruits and vegetables. While it does make noise equivalent to a blender, it works so quickly you won’t have to listen long. A 3” feed tube lets you juice whole fruits and vegetables with significantly less prep time. This juicer is built to last with titanium reinforced cutting blades that stay sharp longer and made entirely of die-cast materials but be aware that it only has a 1 year warranty. Breville does sell replacement parts on their website. We love the included 1-liter juice jug with built in froth separator and cover. This juicer is perfect for juicing in bulk–it has a large capacity external pulp container so you can juice piles of fruits and vegetables with no breaks. It didn’t extract as much juice out of kale as other models we tried did; but unless your juicing emphasis is on leafy greens this juicer is perfect for high volume juicing.
Through this process of leveraged force, the bulk of the juice is forced from the fruit and is then often passed through a filter into a juice collection chamber. Many electric juicers utilize a spinning point to increase the efficiency of juice production, which is preferred by many. Citrus juicers are great if you are making fresh lemonades, orange juices, or recipes which call for large amounts of fresh citrus juices. Producing juice from a single citrus fruit really isn’t much of a chore, but if you have the need to juice large amounts of citrus fruits, these juicers can help you save tons of time!
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.
The gist: This Hamilton Beach model is perfect for either those who are just getting into juicing or even seasoned juicers who simply don't want to break the bank by spending several hundred bucks on a juicer.  It cranks out 800 watts of power and has a 3-inch-wide chute that you can fit whole foods into (for example, a whole apple), so you can spend less time cutting and prepping. All of the juicer's removable parts are dishwasher safe, which makes clean-up super easy. Plus, it even comes with a handy cleaning brush.

Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.


The juicer's side has an indent that molds perfectly to the shape of the pitcher so you always know where to place it. The pitcher lid has an opening at the top that allows juice to drain from the juicer's nozzle directly into the pitcher. There is also a nifty piece of plastic that prevents any froth from making its way from the pitcher to your cup. In our testing, we found that this separator worked well to keep our juice froth-free so you could enjoy it right away. If you prefer froth in your juice, you can remove the separator.
Juicing isn’t a trend that will go away anytime soon. While some of what is being said online about the benefits of juicing is purely pulp fiction, there are still some benefits to this healthy habit. Namely, enabling certain individuals to add vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients to their diet. These particular individuals are those who seem to have difficulty incorporating fruits and vegetables into their daily meals. In any case, if you want to try juicing or would like to replace an out-of-date juicer in your kitchen, we’ve got just the guide to help you find the best match.

Traditionally, this is the most common type of juicer. These typically utilize a fast-spinning metal blade that spins against a mesh filter, separating juice from flesh via centrifugal force. The juice and pulp are then separated into different containers. The problem with centrifugal juicers is that the fast-spinning metal blade generates heat, which destroys some of the enzymes in the fruits and vegetables you're juicing. The heat also oxidizes those nutrients, rendering less nutritious juice than a cold-press juicer.
This juicer does not come with a pitcher, which is atypical in the juicing world. Instead, you simply put a glass beneath its spout and let the juice run into it. It also lacks a strainer, so you get plenty of pulp with the liquid. If you want the extra fiber, that’s great. If you prefer a smoother, less-textured drink, you need to use a strainer of your own as well as a pitcher or other container to capture strained juice. The juicer is somewhat noisy and does vibrate, like most, but it stays securely in place due to its nonskid base. In addition, the machine has two clips on either side to hold the lid firmly in place, which is a nice safety feature.
Since there are nine parts that need to be disassembled and cleaned after each juicing session, it can take a little longer to hand wash this juicer. While Cuisinart states that these parts can be washed on the top rack of a dishwasher, they recommend hand washing to prevent warping. It can be really difficult cleaning the mesh cylinder that surrounds the grater, but fortunately this juicer comes with a cleaning brush, which works effectively to unplug those holes fast. If you’d prefer fewer parts to take apart and wash might want to look at the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB, which works well and has only five parts to clean.
Though some buyers have complained about fussy assembly, I didn’t have any trouble taking the VSJ843 apart or putting it back together. None of the parts were fidgety or stuck to each other; everything locked into place and unlatched easily. The machine comes with a 15-year warranty on the motor and parts, which means you can juice with confidence for a very long time.
In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.
To get that tasty juice out of your favorite fruits and veggies you might need an appliance that can make your work easy. That appliance can either be a citrus juicer or a juice extractor. They both will get you juice but differ in terms of mechanism. A juice extractor first cuts the fruits or vegetables and rotates/spins them at a very high speed that separates seeds, skin, and pulp from the juice. A simple citrus juicer doesn’t provide many features like a juice extractor and is much cheaper than the extractor.
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
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