Juicers vary wildly in price starting as low as $50 to high end models for $1000, but generally, the more you pay, the higher the juice yield and the lower the pulp. How much you’re willing to invest will depend on how often you plan to juice and what type of produce you want to juice. However, it’s important to consider the price of juicing over time on top of the cost of the juicer itself. Juicers that produce lower yields mean you'll be spending a lot more on fruits and veggies over time. Expensive juicers also often come with a lengthy warranty to ensure years of quality juicing.
The benefits of juicing are clear, and the staggering number of juicers sold on Amazon are a testament to the rising popularity of juicing. If you’re looking for a quality juicer, to really unlock all the micronutrients locked away in fruits and vegetables, you need to be prepared to pay anywhere from $200 to $400. There are super powerful and efficient juicers such as the Super Angel Juicers which retail close to $1000—but those are usually popular only among health professionals and nutritionists. With your hard earned money on the line, you’ll want to be sure that you really pay attention to the features of the different juicers your comparing. There are some major differences such as masticating juicers vs. centrifugal juicers, but there are also minor differences such as locking mechanisms and pulp ejection systems. Below you’ll find listed several of the most important features to pay attention to on any juicer before you buy it.

Single-auger juicers: An auger is like a big, threaded screw that pulls fruit or vegetables into the juicing chamber and presses the juice out. The auger can turn anywhere from 43 to 80 rpm, resulting in slowly produced, low-foam, low-temperature, high-volume, and nutrient-dense juice. Single-auger juicers can be oriented vertically or horizontally and are very versatile, good for greens and hard roots. Although vertical and horizontal juicers work on the same principle, vertical juicers have a smaller footprint and slightly larger yield. But vertical models are generally in the $300 to $400 range, so they’re not for the occasional juice drinker. They’re best suited for those who include fresh green juice as part of a daily routine and are concerned about low oxidation and maximum yield. And certain models, like our pick, have food-mincing and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making capabilities. All of our picks are single-auger juicers: the Tribest Slowstar and Omega VSJ843 are examples of vertical single-auger juicers, and the Omega J8004 is a horizontal single-auger juicer.


"ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!!!!!! I have had A LOT of juicers over the years and this one blows them all away! it is super fast and pulp is super dry. you get way more than twice the juice! I juiced a lot of veg, 2 pitchers (that it comes with about 4 cups each) and the pulp container was not even half full, yet there was no pulp in the juice! I've even had the slow masticating juicers, this is better. easy to put together, take apart and clean!!!!! i love it in every way. and before you believe that juice from slow juicers is better for you, look it up, thats what i did, and its not as long as its done fast with a good juicer! I truly love this juicer in every way! I will never go back to the lower end ones (that cost about the same anyway, oh brother!) or the expensive slow hard to use and clean ones! Wish i had this in the beginning of my juicing ventures 20 years ago!!!!!!!!!!!"
There are lots of brands available, but Joe Cross used a Breville juicer throughout Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead. He still uses and endorses them to this day. Note that in the UK and Europe, Breville markets its products under different brands (e.g. Sage, Riviera & Bar, Gastroback). The links below will direct you to the equivalent model. We recommend three Breville centrifugal juicers.
These are also called cold-press or auger-style juicers. These devices have an auger that grinds the produce, breaking down cell walls and releasing the juice, which is then squeezed through a steel screen. Masticating juicers take longer than extractors to produce your cup of juice, but yield more juice and leave more of the nutrients intact. If you like green juices with plenty of leafy, tough greens like kale, you’ll be happiest with this type of juicer. Many can also be used to make nut milk. You’ll pay quite a bit more for a cold-press juicer, however.
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
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