All things considered, shopping for a juicer is like balancing needs, features, and budget. If you are looking to buy a high-quality juicer that will likely meet any demand you have for it (within reason), you can expect to pay anywhere from $150 to $400. The difference in price for the higher-quality juicers are typically found in capacity and overall power. Less expensive, high-quality juicers will often be labeled as ‘compact’. Below you’ll find a listing of many of the most popular juicers on the market today, all of which have received thousands of 5-star reviews online. Yes, thousands. These products have been put to the test by juicers all around the world, and are regarded by nutrition specialists as being the best at providing nutritionally-dense juicers at home. All of these products are available for purchase through Amazon, most have free shipping, and they are all backed by a manufacturer’s warranty.

Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.


Even though many people laud fresh green juice as an excellent way to get a boost of vitamins and nutrients, juice isn’t a magical potion. As doctors at the Mayo Clinic point out: “Juicing probably is not any healthier than eating whole fruits and vegetables … whole fruits and vegetables also have healthy fiber, which is lost during most juicing.” However, it does go on to say: “The resulting liquid contains most of the vitamins, minerals and plant chemicals (phytonutrients) found in the whole fruit.”
Features: People are not only eating healthier, they’re drinking healthier, too! Now Cuisinart helps them do it without giving up too much counter space. The Compact Juice Extractor turns fruits and vegetables into tasty and nutritious juices in seconds – with the touch of a single button! Features: Powerful, easy and quiet operation One-touch operation of on/off push button with blue LED makes juicer easy to use Juice Pitcher holds up to 16 ounces of juice, and can be replaced for uninterrupted juicing Pulp container collects up to 40 ounces and is removable for easy cleaning Food Pusher fits securely into feed tube to guide fruits and vegetables properly while juicing Cover with large feed tube minimizes prepping and pre-cutting Adjustable flow spout is manually controlled and prevents dripping Mesh filter basket and blade assem...
Make sure your juicer suits your lifestyle in terms of how quickly, and how loudly they work. Masticating juicers are much quieter than centrifugal juicers so household members remain undisturbed while you get your juice on. If you need to make your juice fresh and fast in the morning, speed may be a concern. Masticating juicers are slower while some centrifugal juicers can juice an apple in just 30 seconds. Juicer models with multiple speeds are helpful because they extract the most juice out of your produce. Slow speeds are great for juicing soft fruits, like grapes and strawberries, while high speeds are better for firmer items like apples and carrots.
There are several other juicers in the market that warrant a look at. Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to review them. You might want to check them out: Super Angel Pro Stainless Steel Juicer, Tribest Greenstar Elite GSE-5050 Jumbo Twin Gear Cold Press Juice Extractor, Green Power KPE1304 Twin Gear Juicer, VonShef Professional Powerful Wide Mouth Whole Fruit Juicer Machine 700W, and BLACK+DECKER JE2200B Fruit & Vegetable Juicer.

If you want to get into juicing, a great juicer can make a huge difference. Not only does a good juicer help you get the nutrients your body needs, but it also extracts them so quickly and easily without the mess. There are a ton of different juicers to choose from, and some are better than others. There are a number of factors to take into consideration when deciding which juicer to buy:


The Tribest Solostar 4 is a horizontal juicer, like our budget pick, the Omega J8004. It has a slightly squatter body and a marginally smaller footprint, but compared with that Omega model, the pricier Tribest Solostar produced smoother juice but at a significantly slower pace. The whole juicing assembly on the Tribest wiggled in a tight circular motion while the motor was running, and gave a bit every time we pushed produce through the feed tube (we tested two different units of the same model).

Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.

the Breville Juice Fountain Elite is an amazing machine able to help power-up health-focused juice diets. This juicer cranks out nearly 1000 watts of power to ensure you get more juice from your fruits or vegetables than with any other juicer on the market. It’s easy to take apart, super easy to clean, and all the right parts are dishwasher-friendly. This juicer makes use of Breville’s powerful Nutridisk filtering system to provide unmatched performance.


We tested the same three recipes in each juicer to see how well each machine performed with various types of fruits and vegetables: soft produce, leafy greens and hard foods. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor yielded a high percentage of juice for each recipe. What's more, most of the juice extracted had little to no froth, so it was easier to drink straight from the machine. Most juicers struggle when it comes to juicing leafy greens and nuts, but this machine handled both relatively well. Most of the other machines were unable to effectively process almonds, but this juicer was able to create a decent amount of almond milk, with the almonds finely shredded and collected in the pulp container.
Also, we realize that $300-plus is a lot to spend on a small appliance, but we’ve found that paying a bit more for your machine up front is worth doing. Juicing is a costly habit no matter how you do it. Although the initial investment on our pick is high, you won’t be throwing money out with partially extracted, soggy pulp. You can also check eBay and Craigslist for used juicers, especially Omegas and Huroms, because they’ve been around a while. A lot of people sell their machines after realizing they’re not ready to give up the money, counter space, or time required to make juice regularly. You won’t be able to take advantage of the warranty, but you can get really good deals (and even resell yours if you get tired of it).

For your absolute peace of mind, you can go for the more expensive brands and models which guarantee lifetime warranty. If you are a newbie at juicing, however, and are not sure if you could stick with juicing for life, it may be wise to go for cheaper brands which offer limited warranties. You may also look for cheaper brands which do offer lifetime warranties for certain parts.
Features: The Omega J8006 Nutrition Center is a masticating style juicer. Sometimes referred to as a low speed juicer, the Nutrition Center processes at 80rpm, whereas most other juicers process at a speed of 1,650 to 15,000rpm. The low speed protects and maintains healthy enzymes, prevents oxidation and allows juice to be stored up to 72 hours without degradation. The GE Ultem Auger is 8x stronger than most other plastics and the powerful gear reduction is equivalent to a 2HP Motor. The dual stage juice processing system extracts the maximum amount of juice from fruits, vegetables, leafy greens, even wheatgrass! You can also use the nutrition center to turn nuts into nut butters (an all-natural peanut butter), make baby food from natural, fresh ingredients, whip up soy milk, extrude pasta, grind coffee and spices, and mince herbs and garli...
Kuvings released the C7000 in 2017. Kohler said this model has improved features compared with the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer (B6000), which didn’t impress us in testing. From watching a comparison review of the C7000 and the Whole Slow Juicer, we see that the C7000 has a new funnel for easily feeding produce, doesn’t produce as much pulp, and has a more recessed auger for easier cleaning compared with its predecessor. But the C7000 still spins faster than our pick at 60 rpm, and is more expensive at the time of writing. And although Kuvings juicers boast a 3-inch feed tube that, in theory, can accept whole fruit, most apples in the store are much bigger than three inches in diameter, so that’s a wash. When we tested the Whole Slow Juicer, it didn’t hold a candle to the juice quality from Tribest or Omega machines. The Kuvings Silent Juicer was also an underperformer, giving us over an ounce less of green juice than the Slowstar. The resulting juice was also unpleasantly pulpy.
This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.
Juicing is an amazing way to get loads of hard-to-come-by micronutrients and natural enzymes into your system, all while lessening the workload for your digestive system. Producing this juice means chopping, slicing, and squeezing your fruits and veggies into tiny little pieces to release to the most juice possible. When you are dealing with such small food particles, you will quickly find they have a strong tendency to get stuck in cracks and crevasses.
In our testing, we focused on making green juice from 8 ounces each of curly kale and green grapes. This test showed us how each machine handled both soft fruit and tough greens. Fibrous greens are hard to break down, and a high-quality juicer will squeeze more juice from leaves than cheaper models. Soft fruit, like seedless grapes, is a challenge for juicers for the opposite reason—it lacks the fiber that helps the juicer pull the fruit completely through the chamber, and can gum up the works.
Of course, it's important to note that this is an entry-level model, so it is lacking in some features. For example, it only has two settings - "on" and "off " — so it'll either juice what you put in there, or it won't. It's also a little loud, and according to some reviews, can get messy. In general, this is best for those just getting into juicing and who don't necessarily know if it'll be a long-term investment for them.
Some compact juicers collect the pulp in an internal basket, but most others eject the pulp outside of the machine into a container that is specifically sized for the juicer. We recommend purchasing a juice extractor that ejects the pulp externally– this allows you to make larger quantities of juice without having to take extra time to stop your juicer, open it up, and empty the basket. Once you get juicing, you don’t want to have to stop before you’re finished.
Centrifugal: This is the most common type of juicer sold at kitchen stores and big box retailers. It’s the most affordable. Once you feed in the vegetables or fruit, it shreds and spins very fast so that the pulp and bits of fruit and vegetables are caught by a strainer or filter and the juice spins out. Centrifugal juicers can be loud. And, because they are fast, they heat up, which can affect the nutritional value of the juice.
Juicing advocates advise that you start with a basic, centrifugal juicer-only model so you can get the hang out of juicing. You can then move on to the multitasking masticating and triturating ones as soon as you become adept at juice extraction. If your looking for more in-depth juicer reviews or juicer comparisons, click here to check out the top reviews.
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