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Features: People are not only eating healthier, they’re drinking healthier, too! Now Cuisinart helps them do it without giving up too much counter space. The Compact Juice Extractor turns fruits and vegetables into tasty and nutritious juices in seconds – with the touch of a single button! Features: Powerful, easy and quiet operation One-touch operation of on/off push button with blue LED makes juicer easy to use Juice Pitcher holds up to 16 ounces of juice, and can be replaced for uninterrupted juicing Pulp container collects up to 40 ounces and is removable for easy cleaning Food Pusher fits securely into feed tube to guide fruits and vegetables properly while juicing Cover with large feed tube minimizes prepping and pre-cutting Adjustable flow spout is manually controlled and prevents dripping Mesh filter basket and blade assem...
During juicing and cleanup, we also took note of how easy the machines were to use and clean. To see how efficient each model was at extraction, we measured juice yields by weight. In addition, we checked how much pulp was left over, looked for foam (which can be a sign of oxidation), and took note of if juicers backed up or jammed during juicing. We also measured the temperature of the juice, and compared it with the temperature of the produce we started out with. Finally, we tasted each juice for freshness and pulp, docking points from machines that yielded juice with unpleasant levels of fiber. Flavor is also an indicator of how much of the greens actually made it into the glass—sweeter juices had more grape and didn’t do as good of a job juicing greens.
To get that tasty juice out of your favorite fruits and veggies you might need an appliance that can make your work easy. That appliance can either be a citrus juicer or a juice extractor. They both will get you juice but differ in terms of mechanism. A juice extractor first cuts the fruits or vegetables and rotates/spins them at a very high speed that separates seeds, skin, and pulp from the juice. A simple citrus juicer doesn’t provide many features like a juice extractor and is much cheaper than the extractor.
"ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!!!!!! I have had A LOT of juicers over the years and this one blows them all away! it is super fast and pulp is super dry. you get way more than twice the juice! I juiced a lot of veg, 2 pitchers (that it comes with about 4 cups each) and the pulp container was not even half full, yet there was no pulp in the juice! I've even had the slow masticating juicers, this is better. easy to put together, take apart and clean!!!!! i love it in every way. and before you believe that juice from slow juicers is better for you, look it up, thats what i did, and its not as long as its done fast with a good juicer! I truly love this juicer in every way! I will never go back to the lower end ones (that cost about the same anyway, oh brother!) or the expensive slow hard to use and clean ones! Wish i had this in the beginning of my juicing ventures 20 years ago!!!!!!!!!!!"

Noise level: The machinery inside of a juicer can be a little noisy at times, and that's problematic if you're planning on juicing early in the morning before work. You wouldn't, after all, want to wake up the rest of the family while juicing. In general, high-speed juicers with a centrifugal design are the noisiest, while masticating juicers are quieter.


These are also called centrifugal juicers, have a spinning mesh basket with a grated bottom. Produce is whirled against the grate, shredding it and releasing the juice. Pulp spins into a separate basket, while the juice runs out the device’s spout. Centrifugal juicers work much faster than masticating juicers, but are also quite a bit louder and yield less juice. They work very well on the fruits and veggies most likely to be juiced, such as apples, oranges, and carrots, but tend to struggle with leafy greens like kale. These juicers are the less expensive choice.
And the Tribest Slowstar doesn’t just juice. It also comes with a “homogenizing” mincer attachment that grinds without extracting liquid—useful for making sorbets, nut butters, and more. I haven’t used the machine for anything other than making juice, so I can’t attest to its food-chopping and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making abilities, but you can see it in action in this DiscountJuicers.com video. The separate bowl attachment fits onto the base, using the auger to pulverize the food and push it through a large chute without a screen.

"I kept putting this item in my cart deciding between this one and the next higher version. My friend had the next size but she also has a very large kitchen and plenty of counter space, while me I have 1/4 of the counter space. After about a month in my basket I decided to give it a try. I'm glad I did buy this compact version, it's perfect for me. I make one container full and clean out the where the pulp is stored. It also stores nicely under my cabinet, which the other version would not. Since this is my first juicer, I'm not sure how 'dry' the pulp should be but to me it's pretty dry. Not something that is bone dry but enough that I can probably make a small ball out of the pulp...mind you I haven't tried it but may. I also juiced Kale and Swiss Chard I saw quite a bit of juice coming out. I did with the recommendation of rolling it up in a small tight ball and it worked. Not sure if it was because the kale and Swiss chard were straight from the garden to the juicer but I definitely did see juice coming out."
Omega’s newest vertical masticating cold juicer the VSJ843 is a great choice if you plan to juice leafy greens often and want easy clean up and easy storage. Standing at a squat 15.5 inches, this quiet and low profile juicer will easily fit under low-hanging cabinets or tuck away in a closet too. It’s also available in several colors and two different shapes to suit your style. This juicer’s large feed tube and auger work faster than other masticating juicers and easily handled all produce types from whole leaves of kale to strawberries, carrots, and apples. We got high yields of perfectly smooth juice with little to no pulp. The auger design also makes it much easier to clean than typical masticating juicers; Omega’s “Easy Clean” feature continually sweeps away pulp as you juice so most surfaces just need a quick rinse in between produce types. It worked quickly and quietly and can also be used to make nut milks, frozen fruit sorbets and smoothies. This model comes with a 15-year warranty and is perfect for frequent quality juicing of leafy greens and other produce with easy cleanup.
If you’re a serious juicer who needs to cut down on prep time but doesn’t want to cut down on the quality of your juice, the SKG New Generation Wide Chute Juicer might be your perfect match. The feed tube is 3 inches wide which means that you don’t have to always chop up your produce for juicing. The low 60rpm speed ensures you get a high juice yield, minimum amount of pulp, no heat build up, and no foaming.
An efficient design allows the Slowstar to crank out a high volume of juice within a small footprint of 6½ by 8 inches. The feed-tube opening is a relatively wide 2½ by 1½ inches—wider than the 1½-inch chute on the Omega J8004—which helps reduce the amount of vegetable prep you’ll have to do beforehand. The solid waste collects cleanly in a waste container that’s included. The Slowstar has a reverse button in the back in case you need to dislodge stuck vegetable matter, but I never needed to use it.
This is also a relatively powerful machine that doesn't require you to make a ton of cuts to your produce. We dropped two halves of a red delicious apple down the chute, and the machine easily juiced it. When it came time for us to test the hard produce, we were able to drop full beets into the tube and they juiced with little to no pressing needed on the food pusher. Some of the juicers sprayed juice, froth or pulp out their backside, getting the counter and walls dirty. This juicer had no difficulty maintaining the waste and was easy to clean.
Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.
This machine does come with a 1000 mL pitcher, which means it could hold roughly three 12-ounce sodas. Fresh juice does not keep for long, so you typically wouldn’t make lots of it in advance; however, if you are making juice for your family or for the next day or two, it is nice not to have to stop and empty the pulp. You can get through a lot of produce before you need to pause.
"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."
When you feed the machine with fruits and veggies, it will first crush and slice them all up using its pocket recesses. Sinewy stuff like cabbage leaves or celery will be automatically cut short by the cutting teeth, a feature missing on many other juicers. This significantly reduces clogging and tangling (but if that ever happens, there’s a Reverse button to release the culprit).
These are also called centrifugal juicers, have a spinning mesh basket with a grated bottom. Produce is whirled against the grate, shredding it and releasing the juice. Pulp spins into a separate basket, while the juice runs out the device’s spout. Centrifugal juicers work much faster than masticating juicers, but are also quite a bit louder and yield less juice. They work very well on the fruits and veggies most likely to be juiced, such as apples, oranges, and carrots, but tend to struggle with leafy greens like kale. These juicers are the less expensive choice.

The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.
Good Housekeeping says this juicer is "as good as it gets" without having to spend a fortune, though the Breville isn't as adept at juicing greens like kale. Juicer Fanatics says that it's a great juicer for newbies who don't want to spend $300 or more for a juicer. The Wirecutter agrees that the juicer is fast and does the job passably well — so long as there aren't greens involved — but warns that it's noisy and you could get better buy spending a bit more.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
Place a 14-oz. (414-ml) or larger cup or travel mug underneath to catch vinegar. Select 14oz travel mug . Press BREW REG or BREW BOLD button once. When solution starts dispensing, press BREW REG or BREW BOLD button again to stop brewing and allow vinegar to clean. After 30 minutes, press BREW REG or BREW BOLD button and allow it to finish brew cycle. When brew cycle is finished, empty cup and rinse.
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
When it comes to super convenient press juicer, you’re looking for something that is easy to use, juices fast, and can be tucked away without any effort. Most importantly, it needs to be an easy to clean juicer, so you can juice in a hurry. These are all features that you’ll find in this juicer, and maybe that’s why its been consistently rated as one of the top rated press juicers in 2013 and 2014
Reasonable footprint: Juicers can be rather in-your-face appliances, depending on size and noise level. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space. The oval bases hover around 7 to 8 inches in diameter. You can tuck a vertical juicer into a corner quite easily, though they are generally tall (about 16 to 18 inches) and require cabinet clearance. Because horizontal juicers can hog a lot of space, we preferred vertical juicers.
We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.

Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.


In our testing, we focused on making green juice from 8 ounces each of curly kale and green grapes. This test showed us how each machine handled both soft fruit and tough greens. Fibrous greens are hard to break down, and a high-quality juicer will squeeze more juice from leaves than cheaper models. Soft fruit, like seedless grapes, is a challenge for juicers for the opposite reason—it lacks the fiber that helps the juicer pull the fruit completely through the chamber, and can gum up the works.
If you're looking to get into the home-juicing game — good for you! You're doing something great for your health and will also probably save a ton of money on store-bought juices that can cost up to $12 per 12 oz. bottle. However, when it comes to making your own juices, the kind of juicer you use can really make or break your experience. Don't worry, we're here to help. To start, we compiled a list of the top-rated juicers according to Amazon reviews. 
Warranty: No matter what kind of juicer you're getting, you want it to last. You should always get small appliances with some level of warranty, but normally the longer the warranty, the better. Not only does it show that a company is confident in its product, but it also means that if something does break, you won't have to shell out any extra cash.
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