The machine’s individual parts have smoother surfaces than those on the older Omega VRT400, making this machine easier to clean. While cleaning the unit, I didn’t need to use the included cleaning brush at all; I just hosed down the parts with the spray nozzle on my sink. Our top pick takes a bit more effort to clean because it has small dimples at the bottom of the juicing screen, requiring use of the included brush to release all pulp.
Making cocktails at home doesn’t have to be complicated, but we can all aspire to more than dumping margarita mix in a blender. Over the past two years, we’ve spent 70 hours researching bar tools, speaking with some of the top bartenders in the country and testing five dozen models to bring you this guide to the absolute best items for home mixology.
If you're looking to get into the home-juicing game — good for you! You're doing something great for your health and will also probably save a ton of money on store-bought juices that can cost up to $12 per 12 oz. bottle. However, when it comes to making your own juices, the kind of juicer you use can really make or break your experience. Don't worry, we're here to help. To start, we compiled a list of the top-rated juicers according to Amazon reviews. 
All plastic parts (except for the motor base) remove for easy cleanup in the dishwasher. To clean the cutter/strainer, run water over the strainer basket and brush off excess fiber buildup or pulp. The pulp bin container can be emptied by turning the extractor OFF and removing it from the unit. For easy cleanup, place a plastic grocery bag in the pulp bin container to collect the pulp and once juicing is complete, simply discard. 

We used three recipes to test how well each juicer handled hard produce (apples, carrots, etc.), soft produce (salad greens, fresh herbs, etc.) and almonds. In our test kitchen, we measured the results precisely, noted the amount of juice and pulp that emerged, and scored each juicer on performance. We also measured the noise in decibels, monitored spills or splatters, timed assembly and cleanup efforts, and noted such specifications as juicer dimensions and electrical cord length.
Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.

Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.


Not sure what to do with the leftover pulp? The leftover pulp is mostly fiber and cellulose, which like the juice, contains necessary vital nutrients for the daily diet. Any leftover pulp can be used in a variety of recipes, frothy drinks, casseroles or soups, as well as for garden composting. Thirsty for something other than juice? The HealthSmart® Juice Extractor can help children, teens and adults get their daily vitamin intake with the option of making soy, almond or rice milk. To start, soak one cup of soybeans, almonds or rice in four cups of water for 24 to 48 hours in the refrigerator, and then slowly pour one cup into the food chute. The liquid extracted from the soaked mixture is the "milk." For enhanced milk flavor, consider adding vanilla or honey.

Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.

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