Centrifugal (pronounced sin-tra-fue-gal) are the types of juicers that many people are most familiar with. These juicers have been popular for the longest time, and most closely resemble a blender. These juicers utilize a special kind of force called centrifugal force, which is closely related to things that rotate. Basically, it means that if you spin something around really fast, it’s going to move away from the point around which it is spinning. If you spin your arm around in circles quickly, you can feel your hand swelling. This is because the centrifugal force is acting on the fluids in your body, moving them away from your should—which is the center of rotation—and towards your hand. What this Newtonian tangent means, is that centrifugal juicers apply force to your fruits and vegetables by spinning around really fast!
All juicers need to be washed by hand immediately after juicing for the easiest cleanup, otherwise you’ll be stuck scrubbing at dried-on bits of pulp. Most juicers come with special brushes to clean the nooks and crannies that normal sponges cannot reach. John Kohler said that although you can sterilize your juicer parts in boiling water, he doesn’t recommend doing so because it can cause those parts to break down faster.

Of course, not everyone can consume a plate of fruits and vegetables. Drinking it may be easier. And this is where juicers come in. With the right juicer, you’ll easily be able to add all the nutrients you’ve been missing out on with your former diet. But with the market currently overflowing with options, how do you find the best one for you? Well, we’re here to help! Check out our picks of the best juicers this 2018.


Juicing is an amazing way to get loads of hard-to-come-by micronutrients and natural enzymes into your system, all while lessening the workload for your digestive system. Producing this juice means chopping, slicing, and squeezing your fruits and veggies into tiny little pieces to release to the most juice possible. When you are dealing with such small food particles, you will quickly find they have a strong tendency to get stuck in cracks and crevasses.
Juicers vary wildly in price starting as low as $50 to high end models for $1000, but generally, the more you pay, the higher the juice yield and the lower the pulp. How much you’re willing to invest will depend on how often you plan to juice and what type of produce you want to juice. However, it’s important to consider the price of juicing over time on top of the cost of the juicer itself. Juicers that produce lower yields mean you'll be spending a lot more on fruits and veggies over time. Expensive juicers also often come with a lengthy warranty to ensure years of quality juicing.
There are plenty of juicers available between $60 and $160. We tested ten products within this range and found more expensive juicers are not necessarily better. Perks like multiple speed settings, a long warranty and an included pitcher appeared at several different price points, as did the absence of accessories. We advise shopping the features instead of letting price alone guide you.
Sifting through the endless numbers of juicers can be tough, and without a concise frame of reference, you’ll likely drift aimlessly. This guide is meant to serve as a clearly-outlined reference for those looking to compare the best juicers on the market. Make no mistake, these juicers aren’t the cheapest juicers available, but they are without doubt among the best. For those already familiar with the types of juicers, the benefits of juicing, and all the other information that will be covered in this article, you can find a quick reference table below:
Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier.
"I wanted a reasonably priced juicer to make sure I actually LIKED juicing first. I decided to go with this one based off it's reviews, and I really don't plan on upgrading any time soon! This juicer does a great job and it's so easy to clean. I love that it comes with a brush to get the pulp out of the mesh part too. For anyone who wants to start juicing without breaking the bank, definitely try this one out."
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
"I wanted a reasonably priced juicer to make sure I actually LIKED juicing first. I decided to go with this one based off it's reviews, and I really don't plan on upgrading any time soon! This juicer does a great job and it's so easy to clean. I love that it comes with a brush to get the pulp out of the mesh part too. For anyone who wants to start juicing without breaking the bank, definitely try this one out."
After pushing almost 40 pounds of leafy, crunchy, pulpy produce through nine juicers, we think the Tribest Slowstar is the best and most versatile machine for home use. It yielded more juice than nearly every other model we tested while keeping foam and temperature increases to a minimum. It comes with a 10-year warranty on parts, so you can crank it up every day without worrying about wear and tear.
If you are a newbie at juicing, you may be hesitant to spend on the pricier model. However, it’s not only the price of the juicer that you should consider but the cost of the whole juicing process over time. To illustrate, the cheaper centrifugal juicers are not as efficient as the masticating or triturating ones such that there are lower juice yield and much wastage of produce.
Finding the time and energy to shop and juice isn't always easy. With the HealthSmart® Juice Extractor, kick-starting and maintaining a healthy lifestyle couldn’t be simpler. Just one 6 to 10-oz. serving (175-300 ml) of juice fulfills the recommended daily value of Vitamin A and D, calcium, potassium, protein – plus fiber. All without the need for extra sugar, preservatives or additives.
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.
Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier.
We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.

Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control
We spent 96 hours juicing fruits and vegetables, both hard and soft, and attempted to make nut milks. In the end, our favorite juicer was the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, a powerful machine that produces excellent juice and nut milk. It leaves behind only a little pulp and less froth than any of the other juicers we tested. In addition, it has a big food chute.
This machine does come with a 1000 mL pitcher, which means it could hold roughly three 12-ounce sodas. Fresh juice does not keep for long, so you typically wouldn’t make lots of it in advance; however, if you are making juice for your family or for the next day or two, it is nice not to have to stop and empty the pulp. You can get through a lot of produce before you need to pause.
Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.
Juicers that are simple to setup, use, take apart, and clean will get used more often versus relegating them to the bottom of a closet. However, if you want a multifunction juicer that also makes nut butter, sorbets, or baby food it may be worth some extra assembly. Juicers with large feed tubes significantly reduce produce prep time and also the time it takes to feed it into the machine. Juicers with external pulp containers allow you to continue juicing in bulk without pausing to remove pulp. Juicer cleaning can be daunting so seek models with specialized brushes that make cleaning easier, and dishwasher friendly is always a bonus. 

We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.


If you’re a serious juicer who needs to cut down on prep time but doesn’t want to cut down on the quality of your juice, the SKG New Generation Wide Chute Juicer might be your perfect match. The feed tube is 3 inches wide which means that you don’t have to always chop up your produce for juicing. The low 60rpm speed ensures you get a high juice yield, minimum amount of pulp, no heat build up, and no foaming.

This juicer does not come with a pitcher, which is atypical in the juicing world. Instead, you simply put a glass beneath its spout and let the juice run into it. It also lacks a strainer, so you get plenty of pulp with the liquid. If you want the extra fiber, that’s great. If you prefer a smoother, less-textured drink, you need to use a strainer of your own as well as a pitcher or other container to capture strained juice. The juicer is somewhat noisy and does vibrate, like most, but it stays securely in place due to its nonskid base. In addition, the machine has two clips on either side to hold the lid firmly in place, which is a nice safety feature.
Low foam production: The foam that accumulates on top of your juice is a good indicator of how much air has been whipped into your juice by the machine, and more air exposure equals more oxidation. Oxidation is a controversial topic. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, “Because juicing mixes together the contents of living cells, including active enzymes and various reactive and oxygen-sensitive substances, fresh juices are unstable and change rapidly.” So the prevailing theory among juicers is that if less oxygen is whipped into a juice, the valuable nutrients and enzymes remain more intact. But as Kohler told us, there’s not much peer-reviewed research on how or if oxidation affects the nutrient contents of your juice. “It’s all manufacturers’ data for the most part,” he said, “which I take with a grain of salt.” That said, we still prioritized machines that produced less foam, because at the very least, oxidation can cause your green juice to turn brown, and may lead to some muddy, off flavors.

Make sure your juicer suits your lifestyle in terms of how quickly, and how loudly they work. Masticating juicers are much quieter than centrifugal juicers so household members remain undisturbed while you get your juice on. If you need to make your juice fresh and fast in the morning, speed may be a concern. Masticating juicers are slower while some centrifugal juicers can juice an apple in just 30 seconds. Juicer models with multiple speeds are helpful because they extract the most juice out of your produce. Slow speeds are great for juicing soft fruits, like grapes and strawberries, while high speeds are better for firmer items like apples and carrots.
Not sure what to do with the leftover pulp? The leftover pulp is mostly fiber and cellulose, which like the juice, contains necessary vital nutrients for the daily diet. Any leftover pulp can be used in a variety of recipes, frothy drinks, casseroles or soups, as well as for garden composting. Thirsty for something other than juice? The HealthSmart® Juice Extractor can help children, teens and adults get their daily vitamin intake with the option of making soy, almond or rice milk. To start, soak one cup of soybeans, almonds or rice in four cups of water for 24 to 48 hours in the refrigerator, and then slowly pour one cup into the food chute. The liquid extracted from the soaked mixture is the "milk." For enhanced milk flavor, consider adding vanilla or honey.
If you’re a serious juicer who needs to cut down on prep time but doesn’t want to cut down on the quality of your juice, the SKG New Generation Wide Chute Juicer might be your perfect match. The feed tube is 3 inches wide which means that you don’t have to always chop up your produce for juicing. The low 60rpm speed ensures you get a high juice yield, minimum amount of pulp, no heat build up, and no foaming.
The flavor of the Tribest juice was as fresh and bright as any I’ve had at boutique juice bars, with a nice balance between the kale and the grapes. The hue was a vibrant green, like Technicolor in a glass. The foam was minimal, too, measuring half an inch above the top of the surface of the juice; lesser juicers had up to four inches of foam at the top. The Tribest also handled 21 ounces of hard and fibrous vegetables and fruits like a champ. In our 2015 testing, the carrot-apple-celery-ginger juice yield was 15.3 ounces, the second-best result of all the models tested.
Centrifugal: This is by far the most popular style of home juicer available due to its lower cost. A centrifugal juicer uses tiny teeth on a rapidly spinning basket to grind up vegetables, then forces the juice out through a fine mesh sieve. This system tends to produce a lot of foam, and doesn’t yield as much as a single-auger juicer. Centrifugal juicers are best for carrots and other hard fruits and vegetables. If you’re not into juicing greens or soft fruits, this is your juicer. And because centrifugal juicers are more affordable than other types, they’re also a good way to see if juicing is something you can stick with. However, if you find yourself juicing frequently, upgrading to a single-auger juicer is worth doing because you’ll make up for the price difference with higher juice yields over time.

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"I absolutely love this juicer, it is so fast to juice and simple clean up too. I line the pulp container with a plastic produce bag and put my glass directly under the spout so I have two less parts to clean. Using this system, I only have three parts to clean, all are easy to clean and dry. I have very little time in the morning, I can barely make it to work on time, but since clean up is so quick, I have made a juice every morning since I received this juicer. I was impressed at the speed of this juicer and with very little noise. (I get a lot of juice too!) I also like that this juicer does not take up a lot of counter space, it's fairly compact compared to others I have researched. AND the price is extremely reasonable! A friend of mine came over while I was juicing and she was so impressed with this model that she asked me for the ordering information! In the past, she has had 3 different juicers and she said none of them compared to this one! Honestly, I can't think of anything about this juicer that I would change...maybe it would be helpful if they included a juicing recipe book! Thank you Amazon for the quality product and the fast shipping!"
Yes, the Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fast and popular. But this centrifugal juicer paled in comparison with the slow juicers we tested. The yields were low and it was the least effective at juicing greens. In my one-bedroom apartment, you can’t hear the television in the living room when a Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fired up in the kitchen. It also has only a one-year warranty.
"ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!!!!!! I have had A LOT of juicers over the years and this one blows them all away! it is super fast and pulp is super dry. you get way more than twice the juice! I juiced a lot of veg, 2 pitchers (that it comes with about 4 cups each) and the pulp container was not even half full, yet there was no pulp in the juice! I've even had the slow masticating juicers, this is better. easy to put together, take apart and clean!!!!! i love it in every way. and before you believe that juice from slow juicers is better for you, look it up, thats what i did, and its not as long as its done fast with a good juicer! I truly love this juicer in every way! I will never go back to the lower end ones (that cost about the same anyway, oh brother!) or the expensive slow hard to use and clean ones! Wish i had this in the beginning of my juicing ventures 20 years ago!!!!!!!!!!!" 
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