The machine’s individual parts have smoother surfaces than those on the older Omega VRT400, making this machine easier to clean. While cleaning the unit, I didn’t need to use the included cleaning brush at all; I just hosed down the parts with the spray nozzle on my sink. Our top pick takes a bit more effort to clean because it has small dimples at the bottom of the juicing screen, requiring use of the included brush to release all pulp.
When it comes to features, the Omega J8006 Masticating Juicer is in a different league — starting with the way it actually produces juice. According to the manufacturer, rapidly spinning blades damage valuable oxidants and enzymes. The powerful, slow-speed auger in the Omega prevents this. It also delivers considerably more force, so fruit and vegetables are squeezed once as they enter the machine, and then the pulp is squeezed a second time – which maximizes goodness and minimizes waste.
John Kohler and Matt Shook both recommended that we include a few different vertical single-auger juicers to test. All of the vertical and horizontal single-auger models we brought in to test promised low speeds, minimal oxidation, and high juice yields. We also brought in two centrifugal-style juicers to compare yield and quality. These didn’t do well in our tests and ultimately we recommend only single-auger juicers.
The proportion of pulp to juice varies from fruit to fruit. Juicing avocados or bananas produces a puree rather than a juice. Form leafy vegetables into compact balls or rolls before inserting into food chute. All fruits with pits and large seeds, such as nectarines, peaches, apricots, plums and cherries must be pitted before juicing. Also, it is recommended that oranges, pineapples, melons and mangoes be peeled before placing in the unit to minimize impact on juice flavor. When juicing carrots, do not pack the food chute or allow pulp container to overfill, since this may prevent correct operation or damage to the unit. Place carrots in food chute one by one, and press down gently with food pusher to extract the maximum amount of juice every time. Be prepared to rinse individual parts after each use.
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 is one of the best juicers in our review. It is a powerful machine that produces a lot of juice with very little froth output. It is quieter than most other juicers, comes with a 1000 mL pitcher and includes a long three-year warranty. If your counter space is limited, this might not be the right fit for you, but the Cuisinart Juice Extractor makes delicious and nutritious pulp-free juice with very little produce preparation needed.
Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.
We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.

After three years of use and a second round of testing, the Tribest Slowstar is still turning out high-yield, flavorful juices. We’re confident it’s still the best juicer for its price. The machine itself shows only light wear, and all the juicing parts—auger, juicing screen, and feed tube—are in perfect working order. The key to longevity is to let the machine work at its own pace, and to cut vegetables into smallish pieces that can easily fit through the feed tube. Impatiently cramming vegetables and fruit through the feed tube leads to jamming.
We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.
This juicer (which is one of Breville’s top juicers) is a hardworking high-powered centrifugal-type juicer which features 2-speed controls — the fast 13,500 RPM and the slow 6,500 RPM to extract juice from both softer fruits and tougher greens. Its major selling point is the measly amount of heat generated — only 1.8 degrees F — to give you juice that is teeming with enzymes and antioxidants. Convenience is another good feature as it has a patented large feed tube which can accommodate whole fruits and vegetables so you don’t have to spend time and energy prepping your produce. It’s so much more than a good juicer, we rate it as one of the best juicers you can get your hands on.
Some compact juicers collect the pulp in an internal basket, but most others eject the pulp outside of the machine into a container that is specifically sized for the juicer. We recommend purchasing a juice extractor that ejects the pulp externally– this allows you to make larger quantities of juice without having to take extra time to stop your juicer, open it up, and empty the basket. Once you get juicing, you don’t want to have to stop before you’re finished.
You should expect your juicer to have ample capabilities in storing the juice that it produces from your fruits and vegetables. Many juicers feature built-in juice collection containers, while others simply utilize an outlet which allows any container of your choosing to be used. You should consider your personal preference when considering this feature, and try to imagine how you may be using your juicer the most. If, for instance, you plan on making many servings of juice at once, you’d likely want to find a model that allowed for the easy use of custom containers. If you plan on juicing only a few servings at a time, maybe just enough for a day, you’d likely be best served by looking for juicers with built-in juicing storage containers.
Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.
The Omega VSJ843 is a great option for green-juice fans. Juice from this machine is virtually pulp-free and full of flavor with minimal foam, and the yield for green juice was especially high. The machine itself has a lower profile than the Tribest and runs at a quiet hum. Plus, cleaning the VSJ843 model’s parts is easier than cleaning those of other juicers. Omega’s 15-year warranty guarantees this machine will earn its keep over time. It isn’t as all-purpose as our top pick, however, with lower yields on carrot-apple juice and no nut-butter attachments. Plus it costs more.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
This juicer does not come with a pitcher, which is atypical in the juicing world. Instead, you simply put a glass beneath its spout and let the juice run into it. It also lacks a strainer, so you get plenty of pulp with the liquid. If you want the extra fiber, that’s great. If you prefer a smoother, less-textured drink, you need to use a strainer of your own as well as a pitcher or other container to capture strained juice. The juicer is somewhat noisy and does vibrate, like most, but it stays securely in place due to its nonskid base. In addition, the machine has two clips on either side to hold the lid firmly in place, which is a nice safety feature.

For those just trying out the juicing trend, on a budget, or who will only be juicing every now and then; the Hamilton Beach Big Mouth Pro is an incredible value. Retailing at only $50 it has features that rival much more expensive models. A 3” chute means much less time prepping fruits and vegetables for juicing–it even handled whole carrots and whole apples with no problem. Easy to assemble, clean, and use; this centrifugal model has a 1.1 horsepower motor (equivalent to about 820 watts). It’s small enough to fit under the counter but note that it’s largely made of plastic so it may not have the aesthetic you’re looking for. It comes with a small 20 oz pitcher but the height of the juice spout means it’s simple to use your own pitchers for larger batch juicing (and it has a large external pulp container too). This model did a fantastic job on all our tests and produced high quality, high volume juices–it even handled notoriously tricky to juice kale extremely well. We highly recommend this juicer as a starter model or for those who may not juice often but want the option to. It comes with a 3-year warranty and receives gret reviews online.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
Juicing advocates advise that you start with a basic, centrifugal juicer-only model so you can get the hang out of juicing. You can then move on to the multitasking masticating and triturating ones as soon as you become adept at juice extraction. If your looking for more in-depth juicer reviews or juicer comparisons, click here to check out the top reviews.
Features: From the smallest lime to the largest grapefruit, this sleek brushed stainless steel citrus juicer gets out more juice more efficiently. An adjustable auto-reversing reamer features “custom” pulp control settings, and the unique Final-Spin feature maximizes the amount of juice from each piece of fruit. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a breeze. Features: Adjustable reamer with 3 pulp control settings—low, medium, high Auto-reversing universal juicer cone for more efficient juicing Final-Spin feature extracts more juice from pulp Extra-long Snap-Up spout accommodates more glasses and prevents dripping Cover activates Final-Spin feature and protects against dust Brushed stainless steel design Easy-clean dishwasher-safe parts Convenient cord storage Limited 3-year warranty BPA Free

Like all slow juicers, the Tribest doesn’t overheat the final product. Starting with room-temperature produce (around 72 degrees Fahrenheit), we never produced juice warmer than 85 ºF—similar to the results we achieved with the other single-auger juicers we tested. The juice had a small, but pleasant, amount of pulp. If you don’t like pulp, Tribest includes a stainless steel hand strainer to catch solid bits. The Tribest isn’t dishwasher safe, but is fairly easy to clean with practice—there are five parts to rinse and no sponge-shredding teeth anywhere. John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com also cites the Tribest as one of his favorites.

Like all Hamilton Beach products, our juicers offer reliable efficiency and durability. We offer models with powerful motors that are able to extract juice from a range of fruits and vegetables. Big Mouth® Juice Extractors have the added benefit of large chutes that let you process whole vegetables and fruits reducing your prep time because you don’t have to precut your produce. And with all our juicer machines, cleaning up is a snap — most parts are dishwasher safe. 


Hamilton Beach is a reputable brand that offers quality appliances at affordable prices. And its 67650A Juice Extractor is no exception. This extremely affordable centrifugal juicer is easy to assemble and use, even for beginners. The stainless steel micromesh strainer basket ensures that the pulp gets separated from the juice. And the extra wide feed chute enables you to cut down on your chopping time.
Features: People are not only eating healthier, they’re drinking healthier, too! Now Cuisinart helps them do it without giving up too much counter space. The Compact Juice Extractor turns fruits and vegetables into tasty and nutritious juices in seconds – with the touch of a single button! Features: Powerful, easy and quiet operation One-touch operation of on/off push button with blue LED makes juicer easy to use Juice Pitcher holds up to 16 ounces of juice, and can be replaced for uninterrupted juicing Pulp container collects up to 40 ounces and is removable for easy cleaning Food Pusher fits securely into feed tube to guide fruits and vegetables properly while juicing Cover with large feed tube minimizes prepping and pre-cutting Adjustable flow spout is manually controlled and prevents dripping Mesh filter basket and blade assem...
The Tribest Solostar 4 is a horizontal juicer, like our budget pick, the Omega J8004. It has a slightly squatter body and a marginally smaller footprint, but compared with that Omega model, the pricier Tribest Solostar produced smoother juice but at a significantly slower pace. The whole juicing assembly on the Tribest wiggled in a tight circular motion while the motor was running, and gave a bit every time we pushed produce through the feed tube (we tested two different units of the same model).
Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.

No matter what type of juicer you purchase, you’ll end up facing the issue of dealing with the fibrous pulp that is left over. There are many juicers that are marketed specifically as containing ‘pulp-ejection systems’. While this is by no means a lie, it is a bit of an exaggeration of the truth. It would be like a car salesman advertising a car by saying it had an engine exhaust system. Sure, it does, in fact, have such a system—but so does every other car. In reality, every juicer has some sort of ‘pulp ejection’ system. The same can be said for nearly every product for sale to consumers, and marketers will often cling to anything before they fail to mention something that makes their product unique. You shouldn’t avoid juicers marketed as having ‘pulp ejection systems’, but it’s also not advisable to buy based on that label.
Thanks to its game-changing self-feeding hopper, this pretty Hurom H-AI Slow Juicer chops and pushes down fruits and vegetables for you. In addition to being less work than other juicers on the market, the Hurom's automatic operation makes it harder to clog or overfeed the hopper. But because it's pricey, this luxe model's an investment we would recommend for true juice enthusiasts. Available in rose gold, slate blue, or silver.

Features: Low Speed Juice Extractor Product Description Adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet is a great idea, and the Hamilton Beach Low Speed Juice Extractor can help keep you going strong, whether you're adding juicing to your lifestyle or just love a fresh glass of juice to start your day. Having a juice extractor at home makes it easy to prepare delicious, wholesome juices using your favorite fruits and vegetables with no added ingredients or preservatives. And the low-speed, quiet motor is perfect for extracting all the goodness from vegetables, fruits, leafy greens, and wheatgrass. This juicer assembles very quickly with a few twists. When you are ready to juice, simply plug it in, set up the juice and pulp cups, turn it on, and begin adding fruit or vegetables to the chute. The slow juicer's masticating action crushes and s...


This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.
Twin-gear juicers: For greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, a twin-gear juicer extracts the most juice. Twin-gear juicers are also the most expensive models, often costing over $500. As the name suggests, two gears work together to crush the cell walls of the vegetable and extract the juice. They’re best for greens and other tough fibrous vegetables and not great for fruit.
Reviews.com has an advertising relationship with some of the offers included on this page. However, the rankings and listings of our reviews, tools and all other content are based on objective analysis. For more information, please check out our full Advertiser Disclosure. Reviews.com strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. The information in our reviews could be different from what you find when visiting a financial institution, service provider or a specific product’s website. All products are presented without warranty.
Juicing is largely considered to be a great habit to start if you want to improve your health and form better eating and drinking habits. A fresh juice with a good combination of fruits and vegetables can be a great way to get more vitamins, antioxidants, enzymes, and minerals — many of which don't come through when the fruits and vegetables are processed in other cooking methods.

Finding the time and energy to shop and juice isn't always easy. With the HealthSmart® Juice Extractor, kick-starting and maintaining a healthy lifestyle couldn’t be simpler. Just one 6 to 10-oz. serving (175-300 ml) of juice fulfills the recommended daily value of Vitamin A and D, calcium, potassium, protein – plus fiber. All without the need for extra sugar, preservatives or additives.
We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one! 
×