There are several other juicers in the market that warrant a look at. Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to review them. You might want to check them out: Super Angel Pro Stainless Steel Juicer, Tribest Greenstar Elite GSE-5050 Jumbo Twin Gear Cold Press Juice Extractor, Green Power KPE1304 Twin Gear Juicer, VonShef Professional Powerful Wide Mouth Whole Fruit Juicer Machine 700W, and BLACK+DECKER JE2200B Fruit & Vegetable Juicer.
It is very good unit for juicing carrots, apples and similar harder veggies. We used it today (03/15/2016) for large amount of carrot juice (over one gallon, with breaks every liter and to empty pulp container) and it came out with minimum foam, good consistency and reasonably dry pulp. Position of the chute is good, no leaks, no splatter, no mess, regardless it is 1000 watts on highest speed. Unit’s cutting basket has very minimal vibrations which disappear more of less at normal speed and there is floating mechanism added to electric motor that works out the vibrations quite nicely. Well, after all it is a centrifugal juicer not a satellite guiding system, therefore little thing like this is expected and not bothersome. Locking mechanism on this juicer is very well designed, and base is actually made from magnesium like casting, which makes it bottom heavy and quite sturdy. The opening on top is large, so I would be very careful and never leave this unit unattended if one has little child of the kind that can get into trouble in split second.. Granted this is not a grinder, but I feel compelled to mention this - we all should know that little kids, active cell phones, laud TV’s and tired parents when all on can become potentially harmful combination.
In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.
These are also called centrifugal juicers, have a spinning mesh basket with a grated bottom. Produce is whirled against the grate, shredding it and releasing the juice. Pulp spins into a separate basket, while the juice runs out the device’s spout. Centrifugal juicers work much faster than masticating juicers, but are also quite a bit louder and yield less juice. They work very well on the fruits and veggies most likely to be juiced, such as apples, oranges, and carrots, but tend to struggle with leafy greens like kale. These juicers are the less expensive choice.
To look for the best juicers to test, we read editorial reviews of juicers from Good Housekeeping, Real Simple, and Top Ten Reviews, and watched video reviews and comparisons of new models. We also looked at the offerings from the four main juicer companies at the forefront of juicing technology: Tribest, Kuvings, Omega, and Hurom. John Kohler said that these companies innovate and improve upon their technology, and the cheaper versions are often Chinese knockoffs. Watching hours of side-by-side comparison videos and reviews also helped narrow what to include from each brand.
In more expensive juicers, such as the Super Angel Juicer, higher quality materials such as surgical-grade stainless steel are used. These types of masticating juicers also feature slightly different augers, that are closer in appearance to a car’s transmission. These twin gear systems are interlocked and are much more efficient in grinding up fruits and vegetables. However, the price tags on these juicers are considerably higher as well.
I love that this is more than just a juicer - you can make nut butter, pasta, and frozen sorbet, and so much more. So far, I have made a lot of frozen treats, all I do is put anything frozen in the tube, change out the juicing screen to the blank screen, an ta-da! Frozen sorbet, at the ready, the first time I tried it I made 3 different sorbets, frozen coconut milk, frozen strawberries, banana, and peach. Then I put in mixed berries too! It is so easy and fast, and tastes delicious, very similar to some of the water ice we get up the street - but so much healthier! Overall, I am very, very satisfied with this juicer!"

Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.

This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.


The juicer's side has an indent that molds perfectly to the shape of the pitcher so you always know where to place it. The pitcher lid has an opening at the top that allows juice to drain from the juicer's nozzle directly into the pitcher. There is also a nifty piece of plastic that prevents any froth from making its way from the pitcher to your cup. In our testing, we found that this separator worked well to keep our juice froth-free so you could enjoy it right away. If you prefer froth in your juice, you can remove the separator.


In more expensive juicers, such as the Super Angel Juicer, higher quality materials such as surgical-grade stainless steel are used. These types of masticating juicers also feature slightly different augers, that are closer in appearance to a car’s transmission. These twin gear systems are interlocked and are much more efficient in grinding up fruits and vegetables. However, the price tags on these juicers are considerably higher as well.
Health- and budget-conscious consumers: It’s time for a fresh start! BLACK+DECKER introduces this powerful 400-watt juice extractor that will make quick work of your favorite fresh fruits and vegetables from apples and oranges to carrots and tomatoes—without putting the squeeze on your wallet. With a high quality strainer and stainless steel blades, pulp is separated out while nothing but natural, nutritious juice is effortlessly strained into the 300-ml pitcher below. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a cinch! More time for you to enjoy the fruits of (very) little labor.
Hamilton Beach is a reputable brand that offers quality appliances at affordable prices. And its 67650A Juice Extractor is no exception. This extremely affordable centrifugal juicer is easy to assemble and use, even for beginners. The stainless steel micromesh strainer basket ensures that the pulp gets separated from the juice. And the extra wide feed chute enables you to cut down on your chopping time.
The gist: For those looking to get the most out of their leafy greens, the Lexen GP27 is the way to *manually* do just that. This juicer is the solution for those that don't want to lay out hundreds for an expensive masticating juicer, but also don't want to settle for a cheap, crummy manual model. As the folks at The Healthy Juicer say, this thing was designed to be "simple, mobile, versatile, and easy to clean." Simple is right. To use, just put a put a juice cup under the spout, place your greens into the chute, and start churning.  Cleaning this thing is a breeze, since all you have to do is unscrew the parts, rinse them off in the sink, and boom—you're done. Thanks to its high juice-yield and cold-press technology, you can rest assured your greens will be nutrient-packed to the max. 
The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
Hurom introduced one new juicer in 2017, and two in 2016, but we don’t think any top our picks. The Hurom H-AA Slow Juicer is part of the company’s newer Alpha Series. The only differences we found on the H-AA from previous models like the Hurom Elite are the shape of the juice spout and a minor adjustment to the blades on the auger, both changes that won’t significantly improve juicing performance. In 2017, Hurom released the HZ, which has the same design and technology as the H-AA but in a different, stainless steel casing (that costs $100 more). In our tests, the Hurom Elite didn’t handle different types of produce well, and jammed. The Hurom HP is a compact vertical juicer with a smaller footprint than the H-AA (7½ by 7 by 15½ inches versus 8¾ by 7¾ by 16 inches) and less capacity in the juicing assembly. Hurom has a loyal fanbase, including Oprah, and we can’t deny that these machines are good juicers. But Hurom juicers fall short in their warranty coverage, parts availability, and customer service. Hurom’s warranty covers the motor for 10 years (good) and all other parts for two years (not so good).
Juicers vary wildly in price starting as low as $50 to high end models for $1000, but generally, the more you pay, the higher the juice yield and the lower the pulp. How much you’re willing to invest will depend on how often you plan to juice and what type of produce you want to juice. However, it’s important to consider the price of juicing over time on top of the cost of the juicer itself. Juicers that produce lower yields mean you'll be spending a lot more on fruits and veggies over time. Expensive juicers also often come with a lengthy warranty to ensure years of quality juicing.
Centrifugal juicers are also not as efficient as masticating juicers in terms of generating yield. The pulp that comes out of centrifugal juicers is still relatively wet which means that less of the juice is extracted. You cannot count on centrifugal juicers to extract high yields of juice from high-fiber leafy greens like wheat-grass, spinach, and lettuce.

The juice extractor on the other hand is a device used to obtain juice from citrus fruits and vegetables where the pulp, seeds, and the skin is separated, for you to get only pure juice of the fruit or vegetable. It has blades to cut pieces of fruits that rotate or spin at a high speed to separate seeds and skin from the juice that is collected in a container.

Considering the 15-year warranty on the Omega J8004 model’s motor and parts, we think this is the best value juicer you can get compared with cheaper models with shorter warranties. Although its price is more palatable than the Tribest’s, there are some trade-offs. First, the J8004 is quite big, requiring a 16-by-7-inch space on the counter. It also isn’t great with softer, juicy fruits, which get gummy and block the juicer; you’ll need to alternate adding different types of produce when juicing with this machine to keep it running. And, as we mentioned earlier, its feed tube is an inch narrower than the Tribest’s, which makes a difference in how much prep work you need to do with vegetables. Because the J8004 is a budget machine, you’ll save about $150 up front, but you may lose some of those savings in juice left behind in the pulp you toss when juicing things like kale. Compared with the rest of the competition, however, we still think the J8004 extracts more juice from produce.
It does a superior, although not perfect, job with hard produce and zips through soft produce easily. It leaves some pulp that doesn't have all the nutritious fluid extracted from it but not enough to be a problem. On the downside, we had to do quite a bit of chopping ahead of time so that the pieces of fruit and vegetables would fit through the food chute. This juicer is easy to care for. It takes only a little time to assemble and clean, and various parts are dishwasher-safe. The machine also comes with a cleaning brush, as well as a froth separator and a tall pitcher. This is a big machine, and it is noisy but at a decibel level comparable with other good-quality juicers. You can get help with the juicer over email, but there is no phone number for customer support.

The gist: To add another Breville model to the list, we've got the 800JEXL. Though it comes with a heftier price tag than the JE98XL, the 800JEXL is called "elite" for a reason. Breville endearingly refers to this model as the "Rolls Royce" of juicers, with its powerful 1000-watt motor and heavy grade die-cast metal body.  Like the JE98XL, it has a dual high/low-speed switch so you can switch depending on if you're juicing hard or soft produce. This model's "fast" speed setting beats the JE98XL at 13,000rpm, so the process is a bit quicker. In terms of overall quality, the 800JEXL is definitely top notch and great for any serious juicer looking to make a worthy investment.


Hamilton Beach specifications applicable to all slow cookers and their components (including the earthenware crocks) prohibits the product from containing any measurable amounts of lead. Furthermore, the factories that manufacture the earthenware crocks for Hamilton Beach are certified ceramic production facilities whose ceramic ware is deemed to satisfy FDA heavy metal requirements. Hamilton Beach takes all reasonable steps to ensure that the earthenware crocks accompanying our slow cookers provide safe and satisfactory service to our consumers.

Juicers that are simple to setup, use, take apart, and clean will get used more often versus relegating them to the bottom of a closet. However, if you want a multifunction juicer that also makes nut butter, sorbets, or baby food it may be worth some extra assembly. Juicers with large feed tubes significantly reduce produce prep time and also the time it takes to feed it into the machine. Juicers with external pulp containers allow you to continue juicing in bulk without pausing to remove pulp. Juicer cleaning can be daunting so seek models with specialized brushes that make cleaning easier, and dishwasher friendly is always a bonus. 


Juicers vary wildly in price starting as low as $50 to high end models for $1000, but generally, the more you pay, the higher the juice yield and the lower the pulp. How much you’re willing to invest will depend on how often you plan to juice and what type of produce you want to juice. However, it’s important to consider the price of juicing over time on top of the cost of the juicer itself. Juicers that produce lower yields mean you'll be spending a lot more on fruits and veggies over time. Expensive juicers also often come with a lengthy warranty to ensure years of quality juicing.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
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