Kuvings released the C7000 in 2017. Kohler said this model has improved features compared with the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer (B6000), which didn’t impress us in testing. From watching a comparison review of the C7000 and the Whole Slow Juicer, we see that the C7000 has a new funnel for easily feeding produce, doesn’t produce as much pulp, and has a more recessed auger for easier cleaning compared with its predecessor. But the C7000 still spins faster than our pick at 60 rpm, and is more expensive at the time of writing. And although Kuvings juicers boast a 3-inch feed tube that, in theory, can accept whole fruit, most apples in the store are much bigger than three inches in diameter, so that’s a wash. When we tested the Whole Slow Juicer, it didn’t hold a candle to the juice quality from Tribest or Omega machines. The Kuvings Silent Juicer was also an underperformer, giving us over an ounce less of green juice than the Slowstar. The resulting juice was also unpleasantly pulpy.
Our top choice, the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, does a fine job extracting juice from tougher vegetables and fruits, leaving behind only a small amount of pulp. It struggled a bit with softer produce like lettuce and fresh herbs but still performed well. This is also one of the few juicers we tested that managed to make almond milk using water-soaked almonds and water.
Of course, it's important to note that this is an entry-level model, so it is lacking in some features. For example, it only has two settings - "on" and "off " — so it'll either juice what you put in there, or it won't. It's also a little loud, and according to some reviews, can get messy. In general, this is best for those just getting into juicing and who don't necessarily know if it'll be a long-term investment for them.
There are several other juicers in the market that warrant a look at. Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to review them. You might want to check them out: Super Angel Pro Stainless Steel Juicer, Tribest Greenstar Elite GSE-5050 Jumbo Twin Gear Cold Press Juice Extractor, Green Power KPE1304 Twin Gear Juicer, VonShef Professional Powerful Wide Mouth Whole Fruit Juicer Machine 700W, and BLACK+DECKER JE2200B Fruit & Vegetable Juicer.
Sometimes the easiest, most delicious way to eat your vegetables is to drink them. With a juice extractor, fruit and vegetable beverages packed with vitamins are a fresh, organic, and tasty way to get your daily servings. There is a large selection of juice extractors available on eBay. Manual, hand-press orange juice extractors are ideal if you need a small amount of fresh orange juice or lime juice for a recipe or you can opt for an electric juicer. Electric juice fountains provide a quick way to turn produce into a healthy drink. Some are whole fruit and vegetable juice extractors that use the entire so that you get the benefits of all the nutrients without peeling, seeding, cutting, or prepping. You just wash the fruit, put it whole into the chute and wait for your juice. You will not have to wait long. Many home juice extractors can produce a quart of juice in just minutes. The juicer is a great way to avoid wasting produce. You can whip up a pitcher in advance and either pour into single serving glasses and freeze, defrost, and serve, or pour into ice trays to enrich and cool other beverages. The ice cubes can also be added to the blender to super-charge and thicken smoothies.

If you’re a serious juicer who needs to cut down on prep time but doesn’t want to cut down on the quality of your juice, the SKG New Generation Wide Chute Juicer might be your perfect match. The feed tube is 3 inches wide which means that you don’t have to always chop up your produce for juicing. The low 60rpm speed ensures you get a high juice yield, minimum amount of pulp, no heat build up, and no foaming.
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Born and raised in Paris, the land of unapologetic butter, Francois has spent the last 20 years shaping the American culinary world behind the scenes. He was a buyer at Williams-Sonoma, built the Food Network online store, managed product assortments for Rachael Ray's site, started two meal delivery businesses and runs a successful baking blog. When he's not baking a cake or eating his way through Europe, Francois enjoys sharing cooking skills with cooks of all levels. Rules he lives by: "Use real butter" and "Nothing beats a sharp knife."
The vertical masticating Omega VRT400HDS was disappointing. The first trial of the green juice was a failure; the auger couldn’t pull anything through. I disassembled it, cleaned it, and put it back together and finally got it to work. Its yields were low compared with that of other juicers and the machine felt really flimsy, almost buckling as I pushed leaves of kale and apple wedges through the feed tube. It produced the most foam of all the juicers in the testing group, even more than the centrifugal juicers. It does, however, come with a 15-year warranty.
"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."
Easy to clean: We’ve found that all juicers have one thing in common—they’re a bit of a pain to clean. The parts aren’t dishwasher safe, so you have to clean the components by hand. And they have a lot of small nooks and crannies that can trap gunk. We looked for vertical juicers that come with specialized brushes to make cleaning easier, and considered horizontal models, like those from Omega, that are a little simpler to clean because the juicing screens aren’t as big.

Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control


John Kohler and Matt Shook both recommended that we include a few different vertical single-auger juicers to test. All of the vertical and horizontal single-auger models we brought in to test promised low speeds, minimal oxidation, and high juice yields. We also brought in two centrifugal-style juicers to compare yield and quality. These didn’t do well in our tests and ultimately we recommend only single-auger juicers.

The gist: We know, we know—another Breville model. What can we say? We can't argue with quality, and we certainly don't think quality should be an issue for those with less counter-space—which is why we give you the Breville BJE200XL Compact Juicer. The Breville Compact takes up far less space than other Breville models while still boasting the same juicing capabilities. It has a 700-watt motor and operates at a single speed of 14,000rpm. It has the same extra-wide 3-inch feed chute as the other Breville models, so don't let its small size fool you—this thing can still take down whole fruits. 


Some compact juicers collect the pulp in an internal basket, but most others eject the pulp outside of the machine into a container that is specifically sized for the juicer. We recommend purchasing a juice extractor that ejects the pulp externally– this allows you to make larger quantities of juice without having to take extra time to stop your juicer, open it up, and empty the basket. Once you get juicing, you don’t want to have to stop before you’re finished.
The width of the chute will determine how much prep time you’ll need. A wide feed chute means less chopping time which means less total time spent juicing. Some of our top picks have at least a 3-inch wide feed chute such as the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor, Breville 800JEXL Juice Fountain Elite 1000-Watt Juice Extractor, and Cuisinart CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
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