The machine’s individual parts have smoother surfaces than those on the older Omega VRT400, making this machine easier to clean. While cleaning the unit, I didn’t need to use the included cleaning brush at all; I just hosed down the parts with the spray nozzle on my sink. Our top pick takes a bit more effort to clean because it has small dimples at the bottom of the juicing screen, requiring use of the included brush to release all pulp.
The vertical masticating Omega VRT400HDS was disappointing. The first trial of the green juice was a failure; the auger couldn’t pull anything through. I disassembled it, cleaned it, and put it back together and finally got it to work. Its yields were low compared with that of other juicers and the machine felt really flimsy, almost buckling as I pushed leaves of kale and apple wedges through the feed tube. It produced the most foam of all the juicers in the testing group, even more than the centrifugal juicers. It does, however, come with a 15-year warranty.
"... I have been juicing just about every morning for the past 3.5 weeks, and I have noticed a difference when using this juicer. While this juicer takes longer than the centrifugal force competitor, the pulp comes out very, very dry, and there are no chunks left un-juiced! It is also very easy to install, put together, and clean, takes less than a few minutes. I really like the suction cup feet on the bottom of this machine, it keeps it still while I am juicing, so I do not lose any juice. Also, I love the handle at the top of the machine, it is lightweight and easy to pick up and maneuver.
It is very good unit for juicing carrots, apples and similar harder veggies. We used it today (03/15/2016) for large amount of carrot juice (over one gallon, with breaks every liter and to empty pulp container) and it came out with minimum foam, good consistency and reasonably dry pulp. Position of the chute is good, no leaks, no splatter, no mess, regardless it is 1000 watts on highest speed. Unit’s cutting basket has very minimal vibrations which disappear more of less at normal speed and there is floating mechanism added to electric motor that works out the vibrations quite nicely. Well, after all it is a centrifugal juicer not a satellite guiding system, therefore little thing like this is expected and not bothersome. Locking mechanism on this juicer is very well designed, and base is actually made from magnesium like casting, which makes it bottom heavy and quite sturdy. The opening on top is large, so I would be very careful and never leave this unit unattended if one has little child of the kind that can get into trouble in split second.. Granted this is not a grinder, but I feel compelled to mention this - we all should know that little kids, active cell phones, laud TV’s and tired parents when all on can become potentially harmful combination.

John Kohler and Matt Shook both recommended that we include a few different vertical single-auger juicers to test. All of the vertical and horizontal single-auger models we brought in to test promised low speeds, minimal oxidation, and high juice yields. We also brought in two centrifugal-style juicers to compare yield and quality. These didn’t do well in our tests and ultimately we recommend only single-auger juicers.
Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.
I like this juicer, but I often find it leaves more residue than I would like. So I redo it and sometimes that helps. I think if there was less space for the residue to fling about, more of it might be juiced. Some of that I am sure is me, as I am new to all this. I don't find it as easy to clean as I would like, but I am lazy. It is doing wonders for the compost pile. And hopefully, me.
We tested the same three recipes in each juicer to see how well each machine performed with various types of fruits and vegetables: soft produce, leafy greens and hard foods. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor yielded a high percentage of juice for each recipe. What's more, most of the juice extracted had little to no froth, so it was easier to drink straight from the machine. Most juicers struggle when it comes to juicing leafy greens and nuts, but this machine handled both relatively well. Most of the other machines were unable to effectively process almonds, but this juicer was able to create a decent amount of almond milk, with the almonds finely shredded and collected in the pulp container.
Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.
While juicers like the Omega and the Tribest only filled one-half to two-thirds of a standard 8-ounce drinking glass, the Hurom gave us nearly a full glass. It’s a cold-press juicer, meaning it works a little slower, but is likely to squeeze more from your fruits and veg. You can run the Hurom with one of two filters — “low pulp” and “high pulp” — but our taste-testers reported the low-pulp option was still pretty pulpy. If you’re not a fan of all that fiber, we’d suggest the Breville, below.
When you feed the machine with fruits and veggies, it will first crush and slice them all up using its pocket recesses. Sinewy stuff like cabbage leaves or celery will be automatically cut short by the cutting teeth, a feature missing on many other juicers. This significantly reduces clogging and tangling (but if that ever happens, there’s a Reverse button to release the culprit).
Regardless of which juicer you end up buying, the fact that you are shopping for one speaks volumes. You are likely among the growing number of people who have realized the ‘typical’ diet is a poor one. Healthcare is so inter-related with proper diet and nutrition that is shouldn’t even be considered a separate facet of our lives. Hippocrates, regarded as many to be the father of modern medicine, was quoted as saying ‘Let  food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” This ancient Greek quote certainly may be outdated, but with the growing awareness of the dangers of modern diets and food ingredients, it’s never been more relevant that it is today.
For those just trying out the juicing trend, on a budget, or who will only be juicing every now and then; the Hamilton Beach Big Mouth Pro is an incredible value. Retailing at only $50 it has features that rival much more expensive models. A 3” chute means much less time prepping fruits and vegetables for juicing–it even handled whole carrots and whole apples with no problem. Easy to assemble, clean, and use; this centrifugal model has a 1.1 horsepower motor (equivalent to about 820 watts). It’s small enough to fit under the counter but note that it’s largely made of plastic so it may not have the aesthetic you’re looking for. It comes with a small 20 oz pitcher but the height of the juice spout means it’s simple to use your own pitchers for larger batch juicing (and it has a large external pulp container too). This model did a fantastic job on all our tests and produced high quality, high volume juices–it even handled notoriously tricky to juice kale extremely well. We highly recommend this juicer as a starter model or for those who may not juice often but want the option to. It comes with a 3-year warranty and receives gret reviews online.

For those just trying out the juicing trend, on a budget, or who will only be juicing every now and then; the Hamilton Beach Big Mouth Pro is an incredible value. Retailing at only $50 it has features that rival much more expensive models. A 3” chute means much less time prepping fruits and vegetables for juicing–it even handled whole carrots and whole apples with no problem. Easy to assemble, clean, and use; this centrifugal model has a 1.1 horsepower motor (equivalent to about 820 watts). It’s small enough to fit under the counter but note that it’s largely made of plastic so it may not have the aesthetic you’re looking for. It comes with a small 20 oz pitcher but the height of the juice spout means it’s simple to use your own pitchers for larger batch juicing (and it has a large external pulp container too). This model did a fantastic job on all our tests and produced high quality, high volume juices–it even handled notoriously tricky to juice kale extremely well. We highly recommend this juicer as a starter model or for those who may not juice often but want the option to. It comes with a 3-year warranty and receives gret reviews online.


Do you enjoy the finer things in life? Are you looking for the ‘Rolls Royce’ of juicers? If so, look no further than the Super angel all stainless steel twin gear juicer. As its name suggests, its made from 100% stainless steel metal, which puts it into a class of its own. Stainless steel has awesome benefits apart from the fact that its super sexy looking – its also extremely durable and very easy to maintain. We also believe that juice tastes better when its come from stainless steel (as opposed to plastics). This juicer is also the number one performer when it comes to juicing leafy greens, so click here to read our review and discover more about the beez neez of juicers…
Our top choice, the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, does a fine job extracting juice from tougher vegetables and fruits, leaving behind only a small amount of pulp. It struggled a bit with softer produce like lettuce and fresh herbs but still performed well. This is also one of the few juicers we tested that managed to make almond milk using water-soaked almonds and water.
If a significant portion of your calories are going to come from juice each day, mix up your produce. Go with veggie-heavy juices, using just a bit of fruit for sweetness. Alternate types of produce, and try something entirely new periodically. Farmers markets and ethnic grocery stores are great spots to find fruits and vegetables you’ve never tasted before.
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