This juicer is worth it's value. That said I note that since it is a sintrifical force juicer it seems to make much more frof then other slow grind type juicers and the remining pulp is still wet, so not all of the juice was removed ( or more could have been removed). I do like the eaz of break-Down and and reassemble and it is easy to clean. It is small enough for the counter or storage area. If you are starting out and looking to explore the world of juicing - start right here. Enjoy!!
The gist: This Hamilton Beach model is perfect for either those who are just getting into juicing or even seasoned juicers who simply don't want to break the bank by spending several hundred bucks on a juicer.  It cranks out 800 watts of power and has a 3-inch-wide chute that you can fit whole foods into (for example, a whole apple), so you can spend less time cutting and prepping. All of the juicer's removable parts are dishwasher safe, which makes clean-up super easy. Plus, it even comes with a handy cleaning brush.
Hurom introduced one new juicer in 2017, and two in 2016, but we don’t think any top our picks. The Hurom H-AA Slow Juicer is part of the company’s newer Alpha Series. The only differences we found on the H-AA from previous models like the Hurom Elite are the shape of the juice spout and a minor adjustment to the blades on the auger, both changes that won’t significantly improve juicing performance. In 2017, Hurom released the HZ, which has the same design and technology as the H-AA but in a different, stainless steel casing (that costs $100 more). In our tests, the Hurom Elite didn’t handle different types of produce well, and jammed. The Hurom HP is a compact vertical juicer with a smaller footprint than the H-AA (7½ by 7 by 15½ inches versus 8¾ by 7¾ by 16 inches) and less capacity in the juicing assembly. Hurom has a loyal fanbase, including Oprah, and we can’t deny that these machines are good juicers. But Hurom juicers fall short in their warranty coverage, parts availability, and customer service. Hurom’s warranty covers the motor for 10 years (good) and all other parts for two years (not so good).
The VSJ843 makes almost-pulp-free juices, certainly the smoothest juice I’ve ever produced in a home kitchen. And it has a high yield, too. It made slightly less carrot-apple juice than the Tribest, yielding 15.15 ounces, putting it near the middle of the pack among machines we tested in 2015. But it had the second highest green juice yields of any juicer we tested, producing 12 ounces of kale-apple juice.
Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.
The gist: To add another Breville model to the list, we've got the 800JEXL. Though it comes with a heftier price tag than the JE98XL, the 800JEXL is called "elite" for a reason. Breville endearingly refers to this model as the "Rolls Royce" of juicers, with its powerful 1000-watt motor and heavy grade die-cast metal body.  Like the JE98XL, it has a dual high/low-speed switch so you can switch depending on if you're juicing hard or soft produce. This model's "fast" speed setting beats the JE98XL at 13,000rpm, so the process is a bit quicker. In terms of overall quality, the 800JEXL is definitely top notch and great for any serious juicer looking to make a worthy investment.
After three years of use and a second round of testing, the Tribest Slowstar is still turning out high-yield, flavorful juices. We’re confident it’s still the best juicer for its price. The machine itself shows only light wear, and all the juicing parts—auger, juicing screen, and feed tube—are in perfect working order. The key to longevity is to let the machine work at its own pace, and to cut vegetables into smallish pieces that can easily fit through the feed tube. Impatiently cramming vegetables and fruit through the feed tube leads to jamming.
We used three recipes to test how well each juicer handled hard produce (apples, carrots, etc.), soft produce (salad greens, fresh herbs, etc.) and almonds. In our test kitchen, we measured the results precisely, noted the amount of juice and pulp that emerged, and scored each juicer on performance. We also measured the noise in decibels, monitored spills or splatters, timed assembly and cleanup efforts, and noted such specifications as juicer dimensions and electrical cord length.
The proportion of pulp to juice varies from fruit to fruit. Juicing avocados or bananas produces a puree rather than a juice. Form leafy vegetables into compact balls or rolls before inserting into food chute. All fruits with pits and large seeds, such as nectarines, peaches, apricots, plums and cherries must be pitted before juicing. Also, it is recommended that oranges, pineapples, melons and mangoes be peeled before placing in the unit to minimize impact on juice flavor. When juicing carrots, do not pack the food chute or allow pulp container to overfill, since this may prevent correct operation or damage to the unit. Place carrots in food chute one by one, and press down gently with food pusher to extract the maximum amount of juice every time. Be prepared to rinse individual parts after each use.
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.

The Hurom comes with a lidded pitcher for collecting juice, but its slow-turning auger produced so little splatter that we also had no problem putting our own glass directly under the juice spout. Clean juicing makes for means you’re not beholden to the Hurom’s pitcher, making it easier to juice straight into your to-go cup and reducing counter clean-up. (When we tried this with the Juiceman, we ended up with a foot-wide splatter radius.)
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