This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.
For its smart design and features, as well as the brand moniker, the Breville 800CPXL is no doubt a desirable item to have on the countertop in an orange juice loving family’s kitchen, or in a small juice bar. It actually makes sense to have one along with a centrifuge or masticator, because when you only need citrus juice, cleanup is so much easier on the 800CPXL.
The Tribest Solostar 4 is a horizontal juicer, like our budget pick, the Omega J8004. It has a slightly squatter body and a marginally smaller footprint, but compared with that Omega model, the pricier Tribest Solostar produced smoother juice but at a significantly slower pace. The whole juicing assembly on the Tribest wiggled in a tight circular motion while the motor was running, and gave a bit every time we pushed produce through the feed tube (we tested two different units of the same model).
Single-auger juicers: An auger is like a big, threaded screw that pulls fruit or vegetables into the juicing chamber and presses the juice out. The auger can turn anywhere from 43 to 80 rpm, resulting in slowly produced, low-foam, low-temperature, high-volume, and nutrient-dense juice. Single-auger juicers can be oriented vertically or horizontally and are very versatile, good for greens and hard roots. Although vertical and horizontal juicers work on the same principle, vertical juicers have a smaller footprint and slightly larger yield. But vertical models are generally in the $300 to $400 range, so they’re not for the occasional juice drinker. They’re best suited for those who include fresh green juice as part of a daily routine and are concerned about low oxidation and maximum yield. And certain models, like our pick, have food-mincing and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making capabilities. All of our picks are single-auger juicers: the Tribest Slowstar and Omega VSJ843 are examples of vertical single-auger juicers, and the Omega J8004 is a horizontal single-auger juicer.
Everyone from Wall Street bankers to Beyoncé is talking about juice cleanses, but registered dietitian Emily Braaten urged us to be wary: “There is no substantial scientific evidence to support the use of freshly squeezed juice for ‘cleansing’ purposes. Humans rely on the liver and the kidneys to separate out potentially toxic byproducts of metabolism.” The National Institutes of Health (NIH) point out that each of your kidneys “is made up of about a million filtering units” that remove about one to two quarts of waste and extra fluid a day via your urine. In other words, your body already has the whole detox thing covered.
Lead and cadmium are naturally occurring elements in the earth. As cooking vessels are earthenware cooking vessels, lead and cadmium may be naturally present. HBB cooking vessels are porcelain enamel coated to create a barrier between food and earthenware. The porcelain enamel coated cooking vessels are evaluated using ASTM extraction test procedures with detection limits of 0.1 ug/ml for lead and 0.01ug/ml for cadmium. In HBB cooking vessels, the amount of lead or cadmium present in the extractant is below the test's limits of detection. Additionally, the factories that manufacture HBB cooking vessels are certified ceramic production facilities whose ceramic ware is deemed to satisfy FDA heavy metal requirements in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding between the United States and China. HBB takes all reasonable steps to ensure that our cook vessels provide safe and satisfactory service to our consumers.
Reasonable footprint: Juicers can be rather in-your-face appliances, depending on size and noise level. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space. The oval bases hover around 7 to 8 inches in diameter. You can tuck a vertical juicer into a corner quite easily, though they are generally tall (about 16 to 18 inches) and require cabinet clearance. Because horizontal juicers can hog a lot of space, we preferred vertical juicers.
Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
When you feed the machine with fruits and veggies, it will first crush and slice them all up using its pocket recesses. Sinewy stuff like cabbage leaves or celery will be automatically cut short by the cutting teeth, a feature missing on many other juicers. This significantly reduces clogging and tangling (but if that ever happens, there’s a Reverse button to release the culprit).
Are you looking for a quick daily juice to take on your commute or something packed with all kinds of unusual ingredients to enjoy on a luxurious weekend morning? To make the most out of your juicer, get a head start by researching recipes involving your favorite ingredients. There are lots of online guides for beginners. The last thing you want to do is purchase a juicer and have it gather dust because you got sick of straight carrot juice.
With four smart fins on its stainless steel juicing cone, the 800CPXL can accommodate most types of citrus: from things as small as limes to larger fruits like grapefruits, and even some non-citrus like pomegranates. There’ll be a learning curve on how to place some of the awkwardly asymmetrical fruits onto the top of the cone so that they come out perfectly and  evenly juiced, but you will most definitely get the hang of it after the 15th orange.
Not only thick and firm produce like apples or carrots, or more fibrous leaves like kale, cabbage, or celery, the NC900HDC would take even the thinnest of leaves like spinach or dandelion. Its strong squeeze takes every single drop of nutritious liquid out of your veggies, leaving only fiber to the pulp. This is the reason why it also takes the first position in our list of the best juicers for leafy veggies.

Twin-gear juicers: For greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, a twin-gear juicer extracts the most juice. Twin-gear juicers are also the most expensive models, often costing over $500. As the name suggests, two gears work together to crush the cell walls of the vegetable and extract the juice. They’re best for greens and other tough fibrous vegetables and not great for fruit.
The gist: For those looking to get the most out of their leafy greens, the Lexen GP27 is the way to *manually* do just that. This juicer is the solution for those that don't want to lay out hundreds for an expensive masticating juicer, but also don't want to settle for a cheap, crummy manual model. As the folks at The Healthy Juicer say, this thing was designed to be "simple, mobile, versatile, and easy to clean." Simple is right. To use, just put a put a juice cup under the spout, place your greens into the chute, and start churning.  Cleaning this thing is a breeze, since all you have to do is unscrew the parts, rinse them off in the sink, and boom—you're done. Thanks to its high juice-yield and cold-press technology, you can rest assured your greens will be nutrient-packed to the max. 

While its blade chamber is super effective for firm fruits and veggies like carrots or apples, it doesn’t work that well on separated thin leaves. It spins and sends most of the leaves into the pulp collector before even shredding them. You can create some juice by packing the leaves together, but it still wastes too much of the veggies to consider it worth the effort.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
Juicing advocates advise that you start with a basic, centrifugal juicer-only model so you can get the hang out of juicing. You can then move on to the multitasking masticating and triturating ones as soon as you become adept at juice extraction. If your looking for more in-depth juicer reviews or juicer comparisons, click here to check out the top reviews.

The Tribest handled a constant stream of kale and supersoft grapes without gumming up or stalling out, unlike the Hurom Elite, which had to be thrown into reverse a couple of times. In 2015, the yield from one pound of greens and grapes was 12.15 ounces by weight, the highest yield of all the juicers we tested. When we put the Slowstar and the Omega VSJ843 (our runner-up) in a head-to-head 1-pound spinach challenge, the Slowstar produced exactly one ounce more juice than the VSJ843.
To open a can, push front of cutting assembly backwards to lift the blade. Make sure the flip-up magnet is in the up position. Tilt top of can in to position cutting blade inside rim of can. Push down top of cutting assembly to start the cutting action. To remove the can, hold the can and push backwards on front of cutting assembly again. To remove the cutting assembly for washing, twist release button on front of can opener clockwise and lift out cutting assembly. Wash, rinse, and dry thoroughly. If you want to wash the cutting assembly in the dishwasher, remove flip-up magnet first by grasping one side near hinge and pulling out slightly until magnet releases from hinge. To replace cutting assembly, place it in position and firmly press both sides until it snaps into place.
The Hurom comes with a lidded pitcher for collecting juice, but its slow-turning auger produced so little splatter that we also had no problem putting our own glass directly under the juice spout. Clean juicing makes for means you’re not beholden to the Hurom’s pitcher, making it easier to juice straight into your to-go cup and reducing counter clean-up. (When we tried this with the Juiceman, we ended up with a foot-wide splatter radius.)
The gist: To add another Breville model to the list, we've got the 800JEXL. Though it comes with a heftier price tag than the JE98XL, the 800JEXL is called "elite" for a reason. Breville endearingly refers to this model as the "Rolls Royce" of juicers, with its powerful 1000-watt motor and heavy grade die-cast metal body.  Like the JE98XL, it has a dual high/low-speed switch so you can switch depending on if you're juicing hard or soft produce. This model's "fast" speed setting beats the JE98XL at 13,000rpm, so the process is a bit quicker. In terms of overall quality, the 800JEXL is definitely top notch and great for any serious juicer looking to make a worthy investment.
The vertical masticating Omega VRT400HDS was disappointing. The first trial of the green juice was a failure; the auger couldn’t pull anything through. I disassembled it, cleaned it, and put it back together and finally got it to work. Its yields were low compared with that of other juicers and the machine felt really flimsy, almost buckling as I pushed leaves of kale and apple wedges through the feed tube. It produced the most foam of all the juicers in the testing group, even more than the centrifugal juicers. It does, however, come with a 15-year warranty.
The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 is one of the best juicers in our review. It is a powerful machine that produces a lot of juice with very little froth output. It is quieter than most other juicers, comes with a 1000 mL pitcher and includes a long three-year warranty. If your counter space is limited, this might not be the right fit for you, but the Cuisinart Juice Extractor makes delicious and nutritious pulp-free juice with very little produce preparation needed.
Not sure what to do with the leftover pulp? The leftover pulp is mostly fiber and cellulose, which like the juice, contains necessary vital nutrients for the daily diet. Any leftover pulp can be used in a variety of recipes, frothy drinks, casseroles or soups, as well as for garden composting. Thirsty for something other than juice? The HealthSmart® Juice Extractor can help children, teens and adults get their daily vitamin intake with the option of making soy, almond or rice milk. To start, soak one cup of soybeans, almonds or rice in four cups of water for 24 to 48 hours in the refrigerator, and then slowly pour one cup into the food chute. The liquid extracted from the soaked mixture is the "milk." For enhanced milk flavor, consider adding vanilla or honey.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.

We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one!
The flavor of the Tribest juice was as fresh and bright as any I’ve had at boutique juice bars, with a nice balance between the kale and the grapes. The hue was a vibrant green, like Technicolor in a glass. The foam was minimal, too, measuring half an inch above the top of the surface of the juice; lesser juicers had up to four inches of foam at the top. The Tribest also handled 21 ounces of hard and fibrous vegetables and fruits like a champ. In our 2015 testing, the carrot-apple-celery-ginger juice yield was 15.3 ounces, the second-best result of all the models tested.
Traditionally, this is the most common type of juicer. These typically utilize a fast-spinning metal blade that spins against a mesh filter, separating juice from flesh via centrifugal force. The juice and pulp are then separated into different containers. The problem with centrifugal juicers is that the fast-spinning metal blade generates heat, which destroys some of the enzymes in the fruits and vegetables you're juicing. The heat also oxidizes those nutrients, rendering less nutritious juice than a cold-press juicer.
Hamilton Beach is a reputable brand that offers quality appliances at affordable prices. And its 67650A Juice Extractor is no exception. This extremely affordable centrifugal juicer is easy to assemble and use, even for beginners. The stainless steel micromesh strainer basket ensures that the pulp gets separated from the juice. And the extra wide feed chute enables you to cut down on your chopping time.
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