Juicing is an amazing way to get loads of hard-to-come-by micronutrients and natural enzymes into your system, all while lessening the workload for your digestive system. Producing this juice means chopping, slicing, and squeezing your fruits and veggies into tiny little pieces to release to the most juice possible. When you are dealing with such small food particles, you will quickly find they have a strong tendency to get stuck in cracks and crevasses.
Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.

Centrifugal: This is the most common type of juicer sold at kitchen stores and big box retailers. It’s the most affordable. Once you feed in the vegetables or fruit, it shreds and spins very fast so that the pulp and bits of fruit and vegetables are caught by a strainer or filter and the juice spins out. Centrifugal juicers can be loud. And, because they are fast, they heat up, which can affect the nutritional value of the juice.
*Individual results may vary. Reboots are not intended to treat, cure or prevent any medical or health condition. Reboots are not recommended for everyone, and before commencing a Reboot or any other nutritional or dietary regimen, you should consult with your qualified health care provider in order to assess any potential benefits or risks to you with consideration of your personal medical situation. You should also continue to work closely with your qualified health care provider if you intend to engage in a long-term Reboot. Our Guided Reboot Programs are not advised for women who are pregnant or nursing.
Also, we realize that $300-plus is a lot to spend on a small appliance, but we’ve found that paying a bit more for your machine up front is worth doing. Juicing is a costly habit no matter how you do it. Although the initial investment on our pick is high, you won’t be throwing money out with partially extracted, soggy pulp. You can also check eBay and Craigslist for used juicers, especially Omegas and Huroms, because they’ve been around a while. A lot of people sell their machines after realizing they’re not ready to give up the money, counter space, or time required to make juice regularly. You won’t be able to take advantage of the warranty, but you can get really good deals (and even resell yours if you get tired of it).
With this in mind, you can better understand what types of pulp ejection systems might best suit your needs. Many juicers, such as the Omega J8006 Masticating Juicer have pulp ejection systems that remove pulp as you are juicing. These types of systems are great if you are looking to make enough juice for several days, or several people. The Omega J8006 ejects pulp from the front, which should be placed over some sort of container device to collect the pulp. If you were, for example, be juicing on the edge of your counter and have the pulp ejecting into your trash can, you’d likely run out of fruit long before you ran out of room to hold your pulp. Other models such as the Breville 800JEXL come with specially-designed pulp collection bins. This is great for ease-of-use but poses a limited amount of space.

Equipped with a 1000-watt powerful motor, this easy-to-use juice extractor makes it exceptionally convenient to enjoy fresh, healthy fruit and vegetable juice from the comfort of home. The unit's large 3-inch feeding chute can accommodate whole apples, pears, and other large-size fruits and vegetables (extra-large items may need to be cut into smaller pieces first).
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
Low foam production: The foam that accumulates on top of your juice is a good indicator of how much air has been whipped into your juice by the machine, and more air exposure equals more oxidation. Oxidation is a controversial topic. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, “Because juicing mixes together the contents of living cells, including active enzymes and various reactive and oxygen-sensitive substances, fresh juices are unstable and change rapidly.” So the prevailing theory among juicers is that if less oxygen is whipped into a juice, the valuable nutrients and enzymes remain more intact. But as Kohler told us, there’s not much peer-reviewed research on how or if oxidation affects the nutrient contents of your juice. “It’s all manufacturers’ data for the most part,” he said, “which I take with a grain of salt.” That said, we still prioritized machines that produced less foam, because at the very least, oxidation can cause your green juice to turn brown, and may lead to some muddy, off flavors.
Assembling this machine is relatively straightforward, as most of the parts go in a logical location and are easy to click in and out of place. This machine does have an extra piece beneath the filter bowl that we have not seen on any other machine – a black ring, which Cuisinart's manual refers to as the "foam management filter disk." Considering that this machine produces little froth, we can assume this part does its job well. Some grater baskets are difficult to insert or remove, but this one goes on and off easily while still feeling secure.

The commercial-grade Omega J8004 juicer does best with hard fruits and vegetables, and was more efficient than popular (and still great) juicers like the Breville Juice Fountain Plus we tested. It’s great for people on a budget with limited counter space. And with a 15-year warranty, the machine is built to last. In our tests, the J8004 extracted a fair amount of both green juice and carrot-apple juice, falling in the middle of the pack for both tests.


Features: People are not only eating healthier, they’re drinking healthier, too! Now Cuisinart helps them do it without giving up too much counter space. The Compact Juice Extractor turns fruits and vegetables into tasty and nutritious juices in seconds – with the touch of a single button! Features: Powerful, easy and quiet operation One-touch operation of on/off push button with blue LED makes juicer easy to use Juice Pitcher holds up to 16 ounces of juice, and can be replaced for uninterrupted juicing Pulp container collects up to 40 ounces and is removable for easy cleaning Food Pusher fits securely into feed tube to guide fruits and vegetables properly while juicing Cover with large feed tube minimizes prepping and pre-cutting Adjustable flow spout is manually controlled and prevents dripping Mesh filter basket and blade assem...
All plastic parts (except for the motor base) remove for easy cleanup in the dishwasher. To clean the cutter/strainer, run water over the strainer basket and brush off excess fiber buildup or pulp. The pulp bin container can be emptied by turning the extractor OFF and removing it from the unit. For easy cleanup, place a plastic grocery bag in the pulp bin container to collect the pulp and once juicing is complete, simply discard.
×