To look for the best juicers to test, we read editorial reviews of juicers from Good Housekeeping, Real Simple, and Top Ten Reviews, and watched video reviews and comparisons of new models. We also looked at the offerings from the four main juicer companies at the forefront of juicing technology: Tribest, Kuvings, Omega, and Hurom. John Kohler said that these companies innovate and improve upon their technology, and the cheaper versions are often Chinese knockoffs. Watching hours of side-by-side comparison videos and reviews also helped narrow what to include from each brand.
Noise level: The machinery inside of a juicer can be a little noisy at times, and that's problematic if you're planning on juicing early in the morning before work. You wouldn't, after all, want to wake up the rest of the family while juicing. In general, high-speed juicers with a centrifugal design are the noisiest, while masticating juicers are quieter.
The two most popular types of juicers are centrifugal juicers and masticating juicers. These different types of juicers utilize very different approaches in how they grind up fruits and vegetables. Both have advantages and disadvantages distinct to their design, and both have groups that feel one particular type of juicer is the best juicer. Before you proceed much further in looking for the best juicer possible, you should strongly consider your own personal juicing needs. For example, if you’re only ever going to be juicing lemons and oranges, you’ll likely be best served by buying a citrus juicer. If, on the other hand, you plan on juicing loads of Organic Wheat Grass, you’ll likely be best served by focusing your search on masticating juicers.
Also, we realize that $300-plus is a lot to spend on a small appliance, but we’ve found that paying a bit more for your machine up front is worth doing. Juicing is a costly habit no matter how you do it. Although the initial investment on our pick is high, you won’t be throwing money out with partially extracted, soggy pulp. You can also check eBay and Craigslist for used juicers, especially Omegas and Huroms, because they’ve been around a while. A lot of people sell their machines after realizing they’re not ready to give up the money, counter space, or time required to make juice regularly. You won’t be able to take advantage of the warranty, but you can get really good deals (and even resell yours if you get tired of it).
A "smoking motor" is usually caused from binding between the cutting unit clutch and the cutting assembly which connects to the motor. Unplug the blender and allow to cool. Once the blender is cool, check the cutting assembly (see the Use and Care instructions for your model for a parts diagram) to see if the blades "spin freely." Be careful, the blades are sharp. If the blades do not spin freely, the cutting unit needs to be replaced. Once the blender base (without container) is cool, plug it in and turn it on to see if it works properly. (If the unit was not turned off when the cutting unit locked, the motor could be damaged.)

Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.

Are you looking for a quick daily juice to take on your commute or something packed with all kinds of unusual ingredients to enjoy on a luxurious weekend morning? To make the most out of your juicer, get a head start by researching recipes involving your favorite ingredients. There are lots of online guides for beginners. The last thing you want to do is purchase a juicer and have it gather dust because you got sick of straight carrot juice.
Below you’ll find a short list and description of some of the juicers that we’ve found to be of the highest quality. Breville has dominated much of our consideration for the best juicers—as they did for the best espresso machines as well! They are a tremendous company that has received an absurd amount of positive feedback from customers. Nevertheless, there are several other very noteworthy juicer brands on the market such as Omega that offer strong contention for the title of ‘best juicer’. Our final list consideration has tried to account for the best product in several different price ranges, not just the most affordable or most expensive.
If the Breville juice fountain elite is a little too high end for you, but you still want a quality juicer, the Breville juice fountain plus is a great option. This juicer has a great balance of all features- speed, efficiency, simplicity, durability and price, meaning its a great all round centrifugal juicer. Read our review here, and see if you agree with us- its extremely easy to use (and to clean!) while still providing beautiful quality juice at record time. A strong contender…
Juicing allows for a tremendous amount of nutrients and enzymes to be made available to your body, which allows for a fuller more robust overall state of health. The micronutrients released during juicing are often left unused when simply eaten, being locked tightly away in the cell walls of fruits and veggies. While your digestive system can unlock some of these nutrients, many simply go to waste without first being juiced. Juicing is a great way to lose weight safely, since that you are still getting proper nutrition while still lowering overall caloric intake. With all this in mind, it’s no surprise that the popularity of juicing, and juicers, has skyrocketed in recent years. Hopefully, after reading this buyer’s guide, you’ll not only be more aware of the benefits of juicing but also in your ability to pick out the best juicer for you!
Not only thick and firm produce like apples or carrots, or more fibrous leaves like kale, cabbage, or celery, the NC900HDC would take even the thinnest of leaves like spinach or dandelion. Its strong squeeze takes every single drop of nutritious liquid out of your veggies, leaving only fiber to the pulp. This is the reason why it also takes the first position in our list of the best juicers for leafy veggies.

This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.


The US Department of Agriculture warns against relying on juice as your sole source of nutrition. This kind of diet won’t give you enough protein or fiber to maintain muscle mass and keep you feeling full. When we spoke with nutritionist Shereen Lehman, she reiterated this point. “Juicing alone won’t fix an unhealthy diet,” she told us. “It’s also important to cut out the junk foods and eat more lean protein sources, dairy or calcium sources, whole grains, and more fruits and veggies.”
No matter what type of juicer you purchase, you’ll end up facing the issue of dealing with the fibrous pulp that is left over. There are many juicers that are marketed specifically as containing ‘pulp-ejection systems’. While this is by no means a lie, it is a bit of an exaggeration of the truth. It would be like a car salesman advertising a car by saying it had an engine exhaust system. Sure, it does, in fact, have such a system—but so does every other car. In reality, every juicer has some sort of ‘pulp ejection’ system. The same can be said for nearly every product for sale to consumers, and marketers will often cling to anything before they fail to mention something that makes their product unique. You shouldn’t avoid juicers marketed as having ‘pulp ejection systems’, but it’s also not advisable to buy based on that label.
This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.
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Be prepared to clean your juicer after every use. Bacteria love to feast on unpasteurized juices, so it’s important to clean your juicer every time you use it. And the sooner the better — the drier it gets, the harder pulp is to remove. During testing, we found that the strainer baskets and pulp spouts tended to need the most attention. So think about how often you’ll use your machine, what kind of fruits and vegetables you’ll be juicing (some leave more behind in your juicer than others), and how much time you’ll have to clean your machine.
When the device is plugged in, a blue ring of light will blink around the On/Off button. There are five different settings to choose from when using this device. To start it, you turn the dial to the desired speed and then press the button. In general, to get the best juicing yield softer produce should be juiced at lower settings while harder produce should be juiced at higher settings. We measured the noise level at 82 dB, which makes this the second quietest juicer in our lineup. This is surprising considering how efficiently it juices. It also has rubber non-slip feet and doesn't vibrate excessively when juicing.
The gist: The Omega is the creme-de-la-creme of masticating (slow-speed) juicers. Since it processes at a slower speed, you won't miss out on any nutrients. You can juice anything from fruits and vegetables to leafy greens— but it doesn't stop there. The Omega will also turn nuts into nut butter (homemade peanut butter anyone?), grind coffee beans, make pasta, frozen desserts, baby food... to be honest, we're not sure there's much it can't do. Additionally, its slow speed method makes for a super quiet juicing experience.   
The best juicers extract as much liquid as possible from fruits and vegetables, leaving behind very little pulp. Machines that leave large amounts of very moist pulp just aren’t doing their job. The same is true for froth. Every juicer makes some froth, but you don't want inches of bubbles – you want a machine that gives you the most juice for your money.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
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