The Hamilton Beach 67650A Juice Extractor comes with a useful 20-ounce container/pitcher, but the tall design also means that there's plenty of room for your own receptacle under the spout. Although Hamilton Beach doesn't give an actual size for the pulp bin, it is more than adequate. As is common with modern juicers, the removable parts are dishwasher safe.
Juicing advocates advise that you start with a basic, centrifugal juicer-only model so you can get the hang out of juicing. You can then move on to the multitasking masticating and triturating ones as soon as you become adept at juice extraction. If your looking for more in-depth juicer reviews or juicer comparisons, click here to check out the top reviews.

The Hurom’s feed chute is made of opaque plastic, meaning you can’t see what’s happening as you feed produce into the juicer — is it making weird noises because it’s about to jam, or is it powering through a particularly stringy piece of celery? The chute also had a narrower mouth than most of our finalists, requiring us to quarter our apples and lemons before adding them. Not a dealbreaker, but we preferred larger, more transparent chutes as they require a little less prep work and you can see what’s going on.
Like all slow juicers, the Tribest doesn’t overheat the final product. Starting with room-temperature produce (around 72 degrees Fahrenheit), we never produced juice warmer than 85 ºF—similar to the results we achieved with the other single-auger juicers we tested. The juice had a small, but pleasant, amount of pulp. If you don’t like pulp, Tribest includes a stainless steel hand strainer to catch solid bits. The Tribest isn’t dishwasher safe, but is fairly easy to clean with practice—there are five parts to rinse and no sponge-shredding teeth anywhere. John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com also cites the Tribest as one of his favorites.
The gist: For those looking to get the most out of their leafy greens, the Lexen GP27 is the way to *manually* do just that. This juicer is the solution for those that don't want to lay out hundreds for an expensive masticating juicer, but also don't want to settle for a cheap, crummy manual model. As the folks at The Healthy Juicer say, this thing was designed to be "simple, mobile, versatile, and easy to clean." Simple is right. To use, just put a put a juice cup under the spout, place your greens into the chute, and start churning.  Cleaning this thing is a breeze, since all you have to do is unscrew the parts, rinse them off in the sink, and boom—you're done. Thanks to its high juice-yield and cold-press technology, you can rest assured your greens will be nutrient-packed to the max. 

With four smart fins on its stainless steel juicing cone, the 800CPXL can accommodate most types of citrus: from things as small as limes to larger fruits like grapefruits, and even some non-citrus like pomegranates. There’ll be a learning curve on how to place some of the awkwardly asymmetrical fruits onto the top of the cone so that they come out perfectly and  evenly juiced, but you will most definitely get the hang of it after the 15th orange.


Easy to assemble, easy to use, extremely fast juicing, easy to clean, compact, lightweight, and beautiful to look at. The Breville Compact Juice Fountain is our pick for Best Compact Juicer. It boasts a 3” feed tube that lets you juice whole apples in 3 seconds flat as well as a very handy 25 oz Juice Jug with storage lid and optional froth separator. This juicer is all about speed, convenience, and simplicity–we highly recommend it for those who are tight on space but want to juice frequently and quickly. It’s titanium cutting disc and high-powered 700-watt motor pack a punch (but also make a blender-volume level of noise.) We couldn’t believe how quickly it juiced everything from strawberries to whole apples to whole carrots and kale. As with most centrifugal juicers, it didn’t yield as much juice from kale as masticating models but the difference was slight. A very high-design machine, we also love the internal pulp container –it conserves counter space and keeps cleanup and assembly simple. However, this isn’t the juicer for you if you plan to juice in bulk; you’ll need to pause to disassemble the juicer to empty the pulp container. As with all the juicers we reviewed, it comes with a cleaning brush and the parts are dishwasher safe. At only $99 it’s also an incredible value and comes with a 1 year warranty.
The gist: If you immediately think "Jamba Juice" when you see this juicer, good call. It's the brainchild of the widely-known juice chain. Since Jamba Juice knows a thing or two about juicing, they made sure to give this baby a *super* wide chute— three and a half inches wide, to be exact, which is the largest available of any juicer. This basically eliminates the need for pre-cutting. It comes with an impressive 1100-watt motor and two speed settings, so you can adjust speed depending on what you're juicing in order to maximize juice output. The Jamba Juicer comes with a few little extra goodies, like a clean sweep cleaning brush and a recipe book filled with juice and pulp recipes. 
We tested the Omega juicer in our kitchen to see how it fared against all sorts of vegetables and fruits, including everything from carrots and beets to apples and pineapple. No matter what we fed into the juicer, it produced a ton of juice with very little effort. The pulp collected quickly in one bin, while juice mounted up in the other. This juicer is very easy to use, even for a novice.
Masticating juicers rely on direct mechanical force to chop and squeeze juice from fruits and vegetables. This method typically involves less power and lower temperatures and is regarded as the best juicing method by many. Masticating juicers are able to use less-powerful motors than other types of juicers because of the way they are designed. Less powerful motors mean less heat being put off. Many people believe that this reduction in heat helps to preserve the natural enzymes found in juice.
These are also manual citrus juicers. They have an arm on left/right side that you have to pull down to force the juice out of the fruit. The mechanism is quite simple. You put a half-cut fruit on the bottom squeezing part and then use the handle to pull down the top squeezing part onto that forcefully to press the juice out. The arms are mostly made out of metal and on some low-cost models they can break with undue force. They are also known as citrus presses because there is no reaming action involved in it.
Juicers that are simple to setup, use, take apart, and clean will get used more often versus relegating them to the bottom of a closet. However, if you want a multifunction juicer that also makes nut butter, sorbets, or baby food it may be worth some extra assembly. Juicers with large feed tubes significantly reduce produce prep time and also the time it takes to feed it into the machine. Juicers with external pulp containers allow you to continue juicing in bulk without pausing to remove pulp. Juicer cleaning can be daunting so seek models with specialized brushes that make cleaning easier, and dishwasher friendly is always a bonus.  

Juicers are expensive machines that take up a lot of space on a counter, but they’re a great investment for juice enthusiasts. With a juicer, you can offset the cost of boutique juice by making it at home—if you drink green juice five times a week, the savings can add up to hundreds of dollars over the course of a year. Because vegetables are pricey in the quantities needed for juicing, an efficient extractor will make more juice for your money. If the yield on your current juicer isn’t very high, or you have a model geared more toward soft fruit rather than tough greens, we recommend upgrading.
The Omega VSJ843 is one of the slowest and quietest machines we’ve tested, and it produces juices without much foam. The VSJ843 produced almost as much green juice as our top pick, the high-yielding Tribest. So if you’re a devoted green juicer, you might prefer this Omega to our pick. However, for most people, its higher price, slightly lower yields on carrot-apple juice, and lack of versatility make it a second choice to our top pick.
If you're serious about juicing, it's best to get a juicer that fits nicely on your kitchen counter so you can leave it out rather than having to haul it out of a cupboard. That means paying close attention to the dimensions and even the length of the electrical cord. You don't want to buy a juicer that looks great in your kitchen but doesn't have a cord that reaches the outlet.
The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 is one of the best juicers in our review. It is a powerful machine that produces a lot of juice with very little froth output. It is quieter than most other juicers, comes with a 1000 mL pitcher and includes a long three-year warranty. If your counter space is limited, this might not be the right fit for you, but the Cuisinart Juice Extractor makes delicious and nutritious pulp-free juice with very little produce preparation needed.
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
After pushing almost 40 pounds of leafy, crunchy, pulpy produce through nine juicers, we think the Tribest Slowstar is the best and most versatile machine for home use. It yielded more juice than nearly every other model we tested while keeping foam and temperature increases to a minimum. It comes with a 10-year warranty on parts, so you can crank it up every day without worrying about wear and tear.
Assembling this machine is relatively straightforward, as most of the parts go in a logical location and are easy to click in and out of place. This machine does have an extra piece beneath the filter bowl that we have not seen on any other machine – a black ring, which Cuisinart's manual refers to as the "foam management filter disk." Considering that this machine produces little froth, we can assume this part does its job well. Some grater baskets are difficult to insert or remove, but this one goes on and off easily while still feeling secure.
Centrifugal: This is by far the most popular style of home juicer available due to its lower cost. A centrifugal juicer uses tiny teeth on a rapidly spinning basket to grind up vegetables, then forces the juice out through a fine mesh sieve. This system tends to produce a lot of foam, and doesn’t yield as much as a single-auger juicer. Centrifugal juicers are best for carrots and other hard fruits and vegetables. If you’re not into juicing greens or soft fruits, this is your juicer. And because centrifugal juicers are more affordable than other types, they’re also a good way to see if juicing is something you can stick with. However, if you find yourself juicing frequently, upgrading to a single-auger juicer is worth doing because you’ll make up for the price difference with higher juice yields over time.
All juicers need to be washed by hand immediately after juicing for the easiest cleanup, otherwise you’ll be stuck scrubbing at dried-on bits of pulp. Most juicers come with special brushes to clean the nooks and crannies that normal sponges cannot reach. John Kohler said that although you can sterilize your juicer parts in boiling water, he doesn’t recommend doing so because it can cause those parts to break down faster.
Be prepared to clean your juicer after every use. Bacteria love to feast on unpasteurized juices, so it’s important to clean your juicer every time you use it. And the sooner the better — the drier it gets, the harder pulp is to remove. During testing, we found that the strainer baskets and pulp spouts tended to need the most attention. So think about how often you’ll use your machine, what kind of fruits and vegetables you’ll be juicing (some leave more behind in your juicer than others), and how much time you’ll have to clean your machine.
Citrus juicers are an entirely different breed type of juicers. These juicers are designed specifically for the juicing of citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruits. These juicers are often much less expensive than masticating or centrifugal juicers but are also much less versatile. Many citrus juicers are manual press juicers, where a lever-type arm is clamped down on top of a half of a citrus fruit, which is first positioned on a sharp pointed like form. The press applies pressure on the fruit, which is squeezed down onto the sharp, cone-line device. This cone-like device presses into the center of the fruit, driving the innards outwards.
Masticating juice extractors are also known as slow juicers because of their working mechanism that uses a slow rotating auger to crush the fruits against a stainless steel mesh at only 80-100 RPM. They do not shred or cut the fruits with blades like a centrifugal juicer, which makes them excellent for leafy greens as they get the best nutrients out of them at an extremely slow speed.

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