The proportion of pulp to juice varies from fruit to fruit. Juicing avocados or bananas produces a puree rather than a juice. Form leafy vegetables into compact balls or rolls before inserting into food chute. All fruits with pits and large seeds, such as nectarines, peaches, apricots, plums and cherries must be pitted before juicing. Also, it is recommended that oranges, pineapples, melons and mangoes be peeled before placing in the unit to minimize impact on juice flavor. When juicing carrots, do not pack the food chute or allow pulp container to overfill, since this may prevent correct operation or damage to the unit. Place carrots in food chute one by one, and press down gently with food pusher to extract the maximum amount of juice every time. Be prepared to rinse individual parts after each use.
This juicer is worth it's value. That said I note that since it is a sintrifical force juicer it seems to make much more frof then other slow grind type juicers and the remining pulp is still wet, so not all of the juice was removed ( or more could have been removed). I do like the eaz of break-Down and and reassemble and it is easy to clean. It is small enough for the counter or storage area. If you are starting out and looking to explore the world of juicing - start right here. Enjoy!!
There are other features which give you convenience. A juicer that has a large feeding tube, for instance, means you can put in large chunks, enabling you to skip the tedious chore of chopping your produce into small pieces. A large disposal spout is also a good feature as large spouts do not easily get clogged up and have the added advantage of producing a higher volume of juice.
Masticating juicers rely on direct mechanical force to chop and squeeze juice from fruits and vegetables. This method typically involves less power and lower temperatures and is regarded as the best juicing method by many. Masticating juicers are able to use less-powerful motors than other types of juicers because of the way they are designed. Less powerful motors mean less heat being put off. Many people believe that this reduction in heat helps to preserve the natural enzymes found in juice.
The gist: This Hamilton Beach model is perfect for either those who are just getting into juicing or even seasoned juicers who simply don't want to break the bank by spending several hundred bucks on a juicer.  It cranks out 800 watts of power and has a 3-inch-wide chute that you can fit whole foods into (for example, a whole apple), so you can spend less time cutting and prepping. All of the juicer's removable parts are dishwasher safe, which makes clean-up super easy. Plus, it even comes with a handy cleaning brush.
"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."
"I kept putting this item in my cart deciding between this one and the next higher version. My friend had the next size but she also has a very large kitchen and plenty of counter space, while me I have 1/4 of the counter space. After about a month in my basket I decided to give it a try. I'm glad I did buy this compact version, it's perfect for me. I make one container full and clean out the where the pulp is stored. It also stores nicely under my cabinet, which the other version would not. Since this is my first juicer, I'm not sure how 'dry' the pulp should be but to me it's pretty dry. Not something that is bone dry but enough that I can probably make a small ball out of the pulp...mind you I haven't tried it but may. I also juiced Kale and Swiss Chard I saw quite a bit of juice coming out. I did with the recommendation of rolling it up in a small tight ball and it worked. Not sure if it was because the kale and Swiss chard were straight from the garden to the juicer but I definitely did see juice coming out."
We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one!
The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.
All juicers need to be washed by hand immediately after juicing for the easiest cleanup, otherwise you’ll be stuck scrubbing at dried-on bits of pulp. Most juicers come with special brushes to clean the nooks and crannies that normal sponges cannot reach. John Kohler said that although you can sterilize your juicer parts in boiling water, he doesn’t recommend doing so because it can cause those parts to break down faster.

Improve your health by drinking fresh juice made from the Kuissential Juice Extractor. This is a great model for beginner juicers because it packs in features found in much more expensive models while keeping a low price. This juicer has a powerful 700 watt motor that comes with two speeds. The slow speed is for softer fruits and vegetables while the higher speed is for harder fruits and vegetables. It comes with an extra wide feeding chute which minimizes pre-chopping so it takes less time for you to enjoy a fresh cup of juice. This juicer comes with a safety locking arm to make sure the cover is on tight while operating and also it is made to ETL safety standards. Cleaning is made easy with dishwasher safe parts. If you are looking to purchase your first juicer, the Kuissential Juice Extractor is a great option.
These are also called centrifugal juicers, have a spinning mesh basket with a grated bottom. Produce is whirled against the grate, shredding it and releasing the juice. Pulp spins into a separate basket, while the juice runs out the device’s spout. Centrifugal juicers work much faster than masticating juicers, but are also quite a bit louder and yield less juice. They work very well on the fruits and veggies most likely to be juiced, such as apples, oranges, and carrots, but tend to struggle with leafy greens like kale. These juicers are the less expensive choice.
Another important consideration is where you plan to store your juicer and how easily you’ll want to access it. While horizontal-masticating juicers can churn out high volumes of juice, you may not have space for them. Plus, they tend to weigh more so tend to be difficult to move from closet to counter. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space and can often tuck under cabinets. Lightweight centrifugal models are perfect if you need to move your juicer from storage space to counter. Just make sure whatever model you pick can handle the volume of juice you plan to make: smaller juicers equal smaller amounts of juice per batch.
×