Regardless of which juicer you end up buying, the fact that you are shopping for one speaks volumes. You are likely among the growing number of people who have realized the ‘typical’ diet is a poor one. Healthcare is so inter-related with proper diet and nutrition that is shouldn’t even be considered a separate facet of our lives. Hippocrates, regarded as many to be the father of modern medicine, was quoted as saying ‘Let  food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” This ancient Greek quote certainly may be outdated, but with the growing awareness of the dangers of modern diets and food ingredients, it’s never been more relevant that it is today.
Juicing isn’t for everyone. Registered dietitian Sylvia North warned us that “if you have a clinically diagnosed inflammatory bowel or kidney disease, some nutrients found in high concentrations in green juices may not be appropriate.” If you’re navigating any health challenges, it’s best to talk to your registered dietitian or doctor before you shop for a juicer.

We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one!
Centrifugal juicers are also not as efficient as masticating juicers in terms of generating yield. The pulp that comes out of centrifugal juicers is still relatively wet which means that less of the juice is extracted. You cannot count on centrifugal juicers to extract high yields of juice from high-fiber leafy greens like wheat-grass, spinach, and lettuce.

No matter what type of juicer you purchase, you’ll end up facing the issue of dealing with the fibrous pulp that is left over. There are many juicers that are marketed specifically as containing ‘pulp-ejection systems’. While this is by no means a lie, it is a bit of an exaggeration of the truth. It would be like a car salesman advertising a car by saying it had an engine exhaust system. Sure, it does, in fact, have such a system—but so does every other car. In reality, every juicer has some sort of ‘pulp ejection’ system. The same can be said for nearly every product for sale to consumers, and marketers will often cling to anything before they fail to mention something that makes their product unique. You shouldn’t avoid juicers marketed as having ‘pulp ejection systems’, but it’s also not advisable to buy based on that label.
The gist: This Hamilton Beach model is perfect for either those who are just getting into juicing or even seasoned juicers who simply don't want to break the bank by spending several hundred bucks on a juicer.  It cranks out 800 watts of power and has a 3-inch-wide chute that you can fit whole foods into (for example, a whole apple), so you can spend less time cutting and prepping. All of the juicer's removable parts are dishwasher safe, which makes clean-up super easy. Plus, it even comes with a handy cleaning brush.

The gist: We know, we know—another Breville model. What can we say? We can't argue with quality, and we certainly don't think quality should be an issue for those with less counter-space—which is why we give you the Breville BJE200XL Compact Juicer. The Breville Compact takes up far less space than other Breville models while still boasting the same juicing capabilities. It has a 700-watt motor and operates at a single speed of 14,000rpm. It has the same extra-wide 3-inch feed chute as the other Breville models, so don't let its small size fool you—this thing can still take down whole fruits. 
Noise level: The machinery inside of a juicer can be a little noisy at times, and that's problematic if you're planning on juicing early in the morning before work. You wouldn't, after all, want to wake up the rest of the family while juicing. In general, high-speed juicers with a centrifugal design are the noisiest, while masticating juicers are quieter.
The Breville JE98XL Juice has dual speed, enabling you to extract juice from soft and hard produce. It has a wide feed chute (3.3 inches) which means less cutting/chopping for you. And you also get a 1.1 liter juice jug and 2.5 liter pulp catcher. More importantly, the juicer has a safety lock mechanism that will stop the juicer from starting if a piece has been fastened incorrectly.
Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier. 
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