The two most popular types of juicers are centrifugal juicers and masticating juicers. These different types of juicers utilize very different approaches in how they grind up fruits and vegetables. Both have advantages and disadvantages distinct to their design, and both have groups that feel one particular type of juicer is the best juicer. Before you proceed much further in looking for the best juicer possible, you should strongly consider your own personal juicing needs. For example, if you’re only ever going to be juicing lemons and oranges, you’ll likely be best served by buying a citrus juicer. If, on the other hand, you plan on juicing loads of Organic Wheat Grass, you’ll likely be best served by focusing your search on masticating juicers.

Hurom introduced one new juicer in 2017, and two in 2016, but we don’t think any top our picks. The Hurom H-AA Slow Juicer is part of the company’s newer Alpha Series. The only differences we found on the H-AA from previous models like the Hurom Elite are the shape of the juice spout and a minor adjustment to the blades on the auger, both changes that won’t significantly improve juicing performance. In 2017, Hurom released the HZ, which has the same design and technology as the H-AA but in a different, stainless steel casing (that costs $100 more). In our tests, the Hurom Elite didn’t handle different types of produce well, and jammed. The Hurom HP is a compact vertical juicer with a smaller footprint than the H-AA (7½ by 7 by 15½ inches versus 8¾ by 7¾ by 16 inches) and less capacity in the juicing assembly. Hurom has a loyal fanbase, including Oprah, and we can’t deny that these machines are good juicers. But Hurom juicers fall short in their warranty coverage, parts availability, and customer service. Hurom’s warranty covers the motor for 10 years (good) and all other parts for two years (not so good).
The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.
Centrifugal juicers are also not as efficient as masticating juicers in terms of generating yield. The pulp that comes out of centrifugal juicers is still relatively wet which means that less of the juice is extracted. You cannot count on centrifugal juicers to extract high yields of juice from high-fiber leafy greens like wheat-grass, spinach, and lettuce.
After looking and thinking a while I triggered to get this juicer. This juicer is really useful for my mom and dad who drink mostly fruits and veggies juice. I'm really happy I decided to try out this juicer. Everyone in house using it for their own use. It is easy to use and wash. If you want less cleaning then just put a small plastic bag in the trash bin of the juicer for easier cleaning. I have washed the parts of the juicer quickly after using it so the stuff doesn't dry. It is pretty quiet. Overall this juicer has given me wonderful results and hopefully will for a long time!
Regardless of which type you choose, there's one for you on our list. For our best centrifugal juicer, we chose the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain, for its high quality, convenient wide-mouth chute, and outstanding reviews. Our favorite masticating juicer is the Omega J8006, for its quality and incredible versatility in terms of how many different things you can make with it. Our budget-friendly pick goes to the Hamilton Beach (67601A) Juicer, which is a great option for anyone who wants a solid juicer with all the necessary features without breaking the bank. 
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
Making cocktails at home doesn’t have to be complicated, but we can all aspire to more than dumping margarita mix in a blender. Over the past two years, we’ve spent 70 hours researching bar tools, speaking with some of the top bartenders in the country and testing five dozen models to bring you this guide to the absolute best items for home mixology.
Another important consideration is where you plan to store your juicer and how easily you’ll want to access it. While horizontal-masticating juicers can churn out high volumes of juice, you may not have space for them. Plus, they tend to weigh more so tend to be difficult to move from closet to counter. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space and can often tuck under cabinets. Lightweight centrifugal models are perfect if you need to move your juicer from storage space to counter. Just make sure whatever model you pick can handle the volume of juice you plan to make: smaller juicers equal smaller amounts of juice per batch.
While all juicers require scrubbing, we wanted to find the models that were as simple to clean as possible, free of nooks and crannies where pulp could collect. Despite a reputation that cold-press models will have you digging pulp out of their components for hours, our testing found that they were only slightly more difficult to clean than the centrifugal juicers.

Reasonable footprint: Juicers can be rather in-your-face appliances, depending on size and noise level. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space. The oval bases hover around 7 to 8 inches in diameter. You can tuck a vertical juicer into a corner quite easily, though they are generally tall (about 16 to 18 inches) and require cabinet clearance. Because horizontal juicers can hog a lot of space, we preferred vertical juicers.
The Slowstar has a proprietary “Duoblade” auger, which has two cutting edges to chop and crush more with each rotation than single edges can. The motor uses a three-gear system that allows it to turn slowly but with plenty of torque; in our testing, we found that this translates to low-temperature juice with maximum yields from even low-moisture greens like kale.
While all juicers require scrubbing, we wanted to find the models that were as simple to clean as possible, free of nooks and crannies where pulp could collect. Despite a reputation that cold-press models will have you digging pulp out of their components for hours, our testing found that they were only slightly more difficult to clean than the centrifugal juicers.
John Kohler and Matt Shook both recommended that we include a few different vertical single-auger juicers to test. All of the vertical and horizontal single-auger models we brought in to test promised low speeds, minimal oxidation, and high juice yields. We also brought in two centrifugal-style juicers to compare yield and quality. These didn’t do well in our tests and ultimately we recommend only single-auger juicers.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.
Easy to clean: We’ve found that all juicers have one thing in common—they’re a bit of a pain to clean. The parts aren’t dishwasher safe, so you have to clean the components by hand. And they have a lot of small nooks and crannies that can trap gunk. We looked for vertical juicers that come with specialized brushes to make cleaning easier, and considered horizontal models, like those from Omega, that are a little simpler to clean because the juicing screens aren’t as big.
In our testing, we focused on making green juice from 8 ounces each of curly kale and green grapes. This test showed us how each machine handled both soft fruit and tough greens. Fibrous greens are hard to break down, and a high-quality juicer will squeeze more juice from leaves than cheaper models. Soft fruit, like seedless grapes, is a challenge for juicers for the opposite reason—it lacks the fiber that helps the juicer pull the fruit completely through the chamber, and can gum up the works.
No matter what type of juicer you purchase, you’ll end up facing the issue of dealing with the fibrous pulp that is left over. There are many juicers that are marketed specifically as containing ‘pulp-ejection systems’. While this is by no means a lie, it is a bit of an exaggeration of the truth. It would be like a car salesman advertising a car by saying it had an engine exhaust system. Sure, it does, in fact, have such a system—but so does every other car. In reality, every juicer has some sort of ‘pulp ejection’ system. The same can be said for nearly every product for sale to consumers, and marketers will often cling to anything before they fail to mention something that makes their product unique. You shouldn’t avoid juicers marketed as having ‘pulp ejection systems’, but it’s also not advisable to buy based on that label.

There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.


Juicers vary wildly in price starting as low as $50 to high end models for $1000, but generally, the more you pay, the higher the juice yield and the lower the pulp. How much you’re willing to invest will depend on how often you plan to juice and what type of produce you want to juice. However, it’s important to consider the price of juicing over time on top of the cost of the juicer itself. Juicers that produce lower yields mean you'll be spending a lot more on fruits and veggies over time. Expensive juicers also often come with a lengthy warranty to ensure years of quality juicing.
Traditionally, this is the most common type of juicer. These typically utilize a fast-spinning metal blade that spins against a mesh filter, separating juice from flesh via centrifugal force. The juice and pulp are then separated into different containers. The problem with centrifugal juicers is that the fast-spinning metal blade generates heat, which destroys some of the enzymes in the fruits and vegetables you're juicing. The heat also oxidizes those nutrients, rendering less nutritious juice than a cold-press juicer.
The Tribest handled a constant stream of kale and supersoft grapes without gumming up or stalling out, unlike the Hurom Elite, which had to be thrown into reverse a couple of times. In 2015, the yield from one pound of greens and grapes was 12.15 ounces by weight, the highest yield of all the juicers we tested. When we put the Slowstar and the Omega VSJ843 (our runner-up) in a head-to-head 1-pound spinach challenge, the Slowstar produced exactly one ounce more juice than the VSJ843.

Kuvings released the C7000 in 2017. Kohler said this model has improved features compared with the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer (B6000), which didn’t impress us in testing. From watching a comparison review of the C7000 and the Whole Slow Juicer, we see that the C7000 has a new funnel for easily feeding produce, doesn’t produce as much pulp, and has a more recessed auger for easier cleaning compared with its predecessor. But the C7000 still spins faster than our pick at 60 rpm, and is more expensive at the time of writing. And although Kuvings juicers boast a 3-inch feed tube that, in theory, can accept whole fruit, most apples in the store are much bigger than three inches in diameter, so that’s a wash. When we tested the Whole Slow Juicer, it didn’t hold a candle to the juice quality from Tribest or Omega machines. The Kuvings Silent Juicer was also an underperformer, giving us over an ounce less of green juice than the Slowstar. The resulting juice was also unpleasantly pulpy.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
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