Though some buyers have complained about fussy assembly, I didn’t have any trouble taking the VSJ843 apart or putting it back together. None of the parts were fidgety or stuck to each other; everything locked into place and unlatched easily. The machine comes with a 15-year warranty on the motor and parts, which means you can juice with confidence for a very long time.
Traditionally, this is the most common type of juicer. These typically utilize a fast-spinning metal blade that spins against a mesh filter, separating juice from flesh via centrifugal force. The juice and pulp are then separated into different containers. The problem with centrifugal juicers is that the fast-spinning metal blade generates heat, which destroys some of the enzymes in the fruits and vegetables you're juicing. The heat also oxidizes those nutrients, rendering less nutritious juice than a cold-press juicer.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.

It does a superior, although not perfect, job with hard produce and zips through soft produce easily. It leaves some pulp that doesn't have all the nutritious fluid extracted from it but not enough to be a problem. On the downside, we had to do quite a bit of chopping ahead of time so that the pieces of fruit and vegetables would fit through the food chute. This juicer is easy to care for. It takes only a little time to assemble and clean, and various parts are dishwasher-safe. The machine also comes with a cleaning brush, as well as a froth separator and a tall pitcher. This is a big machine, and it is noisy but at a decibel level comparable with other good-quality juicers. You can get help with the juicer over email, but there is no phone number for customer support.
Single-auger juicers: An auger is like a big, threaded screw that pulls fruit or vegetables into the juicing chamber and presses the juice out. The auger can turn anywhere from 43 to 80 rpm, resulting in slowly produced, low-foam, low-temperature, high-volume, and nutrient-dense juice. Single-auger juicers can be oriented vertically or horizontally and are very versatile, good for greens and hard roots. Although vertical and horizontal juicers work on the same principle, vertical juicers have a smaller footprint and slightly larger yield. But vertical models are generally in the $300 to $400 range, so they’re not for the occasional juice drinker. They’re best suited for those who include fresh green juice as part of a daily routine and are concerned about low oxidation and maximum yield. And certain models, like our pick, have food-mincing and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making capabilities. All of our picks are single-auger juicers: the Tribest Slowstar and Omega VSJ843 are examples of vertical single-auger juicers, and the Omega J8004 is a horizontal single-auger juicer.
Warranty: No matter what kind of juicer you're getting, you want it to last. You should always get small appliances with some level of warranty, but normally the longer the warranty, the better. Not only does it show that a company is confident in its product, but it also means that if something does break, you won't have to shell out any extra cash.
Feeder tubes are the parts of juicers where the food is inserted. The larger your feeder tube, the more fruits, and vegetables you’ll be able to cram in at once. Some less-expensive juicers have tops that come off completely, similar to blenders. Juicers with feeder tubes also offer the advantage of being able to press the fruits and veggies into the juicer, helping to chop and grind them up.
Twin-gear juicers: For greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, a twin-gear juicer extracts the most juice. Twin-gear juicers are also the most expensive models, often costing over $500. As the name suggests, two gears work together to crush the cell walls of the vegetable and extract the juice. They’re best for greens and other tough fibrous vegetables and not great for fruit.
Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier. 
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