We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
We invested 96 hours in testing and evaluating juicers, measuring the amount of juice versus pulp each produced, the amount of froth created, and how much prep work was needed to get fruits and vegetables to fit through the food chute. In some cases, we had to spend quite a bit of time chopping hard produce into small- or medium-sized pieces, while other juicers had chutes so big we could simply cut an average apple, orange or beet into quarters. We also evaluated how much pressure we needed to exert to push fruits and vegetables through the juicer.
Yes, the Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fast and popular. But this centrifugal juicer paled in comparison with the slow juicers we tested. The yields were low and it was the least effective at juicing greens. In my one-bedroom apartment, you can’t hear the television in the living room when a Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fired up in the kitchen. It also has only a one-year warranty.
Juicers that are simple to setup, use, take apart, and clean will get used more often versus relegating them to the bottom of a closet. However, if you want a multifunction juicer that also makes nut butter, sorbets, or baby food it may be worth some extra assembly. Juicers with large feed tubes significantly reduce produce prep time and also the time it takes to feed it into the machine. Juicers with external pulp containers allow you to continue juicing in bulk without pausing to remove pulp. Juicer cleaning can be daunting so seek models with specialized brushes that make cleaning easier, and dishwasher friendly is always a bonus. 
The commercial-grade Omega J8004 juicer does best with hard fruits and vegetables, and was more efficient than popular (and still great) juicers like the Breville Juice Fountain Plus we tested. It’s great for people on a budget with limited counter space. And with a 15-year warranty, the machine is built to last. In our tests, the J8004 extracted a fair amount of both green juice and carrot-apple juice, falling in the middle of the pack for both tests.
It’s never been easier to juice at home with the die-cast and stainless steel Cuisinart® Juice Extractor. The 3" feed tube easily handles your favorite whole fruits and vegetables and the adjustable flow spout eliminates drips and spills for clean countertops. The 5-speed control dial is easy to operate, letting you juice the softest berries, leafiest kale, or crunchiest apple into the 1-liter pitcher. The unique filter basket reduces foam, and the unit is so quiet, you won’t wake the family while you’re making fresh, nutritious juice for breakfast!  

We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
The two most popular types of juicers are centrifugal juicers and masticating juicers. These different types of juicers utilize very different approaches in how they grind up fruits and vegetables. Both have advantages and disadvantages distinct to their design, and both have groups that feel one particular type of juicer is the best juicer. Before you proceed much further in looking for the best juicer possible, you should strongly consider your own personal juicing needs. For example, if you’re only ever going to be juicing lemons and oranges, you’ll likely be best served by buying a citrus juicer. If, on the other hand, you plan on juicing loads of Organic Wheat Grass, you’ll likely be best served by focusing your search on masticating juicers.
For its smart design and features, as well as the brand moniker, the Breville 800CPXL is no doubt a desirable item to have on the countertop in an orange juice loving family’s kitchen, or in a small juice bar. It actually makes sense to have one along with a centrifuge or masticator, because when you only need citrus juice, cleanup is so much easier on the 800CPXL.
The gist: If you immediately think "Jamba Juice" when you see this juicer, good call. It's the brainchild of the widely-known juice chain. Since Jamba Juice knows a thing or two about juicing, they made sure to give this baby a *super* wide chute— three and a half inches wide, to be exact, which is the largest available of any juicer. This basically eliminates the need for pre-cutting. It comes with an impressive 1100-watt motor and two speed settings, so you can adjust speed depending on what you're juicing in order to maximize juice output. The Jamba Juicer comes with a few little extra goodies, like a clean sweep cleaning brush and a recipe book filled with juice and pulp recipes. 
The juicer also has a big enough mouth for larger pieces of fruit, and in many cases, you'll be able to fit an entire fruit or vegetable in there without having to cut it up at all. That cuts down on prep time and ensures you won't have to dirty up knives and cutting boards to make some juice. The motor inside the juicer is 850-watt, and the device comes with a liter jug, a froth separator, and a cleaning brush.
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