These are the cheapest citrus juicers available that can create a lot of mess making a cup of orange juice. It also has a cone-shaped head on which you have to squeeze the half-cut fruit in order to juice it. The pulp and seeds are collected on the top of the strainer and the juice gets collected in the cup. The pulp and the seeds are also mixed with the juice if the size of the holes on the strainer is wide.

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In more expensive juicers, such as the Super Angel Juicer, higher quality materials such as surgical-grade stainless steel are used. These types of masticating juicers also feature slightly different augers, that are closer in appearance to a car’s transmission. These twin gear systems are interlocked and are much more efficient in grinding up fruits and vegetables. However, the price tags on these juicers are considerably higher as well.
If you’re a serious juicer who needs to cut down on prep time but doesn’t want to cut down on the quality of your juice, the SKG New Generation Wide Chute Juicer might be your perfect match. The feed tube is 3 inches wide which means that you don’t have to always chop up your produce for juicing. The low 60rpm speed ensures you get a high juice yield, minimum amount of pulp, no heat build up, and no foaming.
Like all slow juicers, the Tribest doesn’t overheat the final product. Starting with room-temperature produce (around 72 degrees Fahrenheit), we never produced juice warmer than 85 ºF—similar to the results we achieved with the other single-auger juicers we tested. The juice had a small, but pleasant, amount of pulp. If you don’t like pulp, Tribest includes a stainless steel hand strainer to catch solid bits. The Tribest isn’t dishwasher safe, but is fairly easy to clean with practice—there are five parts to rinse and no sponge-shredding teeth anywhere. John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com also cites the Tribest as one of his favorites.
We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.

Chef Liana Green told us that a good juicer can “juice green leafy vegetables and produce a high yield from ingredients.” The most efficient juicers will squeeze your fruits and veggies dry. The centrifugal juicers averaged a speedy two minutes per glass of juice, but they also tended to be quite messy, splattering juice everywhere if we placed our own glasses beneath the juice spouts. The cold-press juicers were generally quieter and neater during juicing, leaving us with a much cleaner countertop — but they required about seven minutes to fill one glass.
Juicing isn’t for everyone. Registered dietitian Sylvia North warned us that “if you have a clinically diagnosed inflammatory bowel or kidney disease, some nutrients found in high concentrations in green juices may not be appropriate.” If you’re navigating any health challenges, it’s best to talk to your registered dietitian or doctor before you shop for a juicer.
To get that tasty juice out of your favorite fruits and veggies you might need an appliance that can make your work easy. That appliance can either be a citrus juicer or a juice extractor. They both will get you juice but differ in terms of mechanism. A juice extractor first cuts the fruits or vegetables and rotates/spins them at a very high speed that separates seeds, skin, and pulp from the juice. A simple citrus juicer doesn’t provide many features like a juice extractor and is much cheaper than the extractor.

Everyone from Wall Street bankers to Beyoncé is talking about juice cleanses, but registered dietitian Emily Braaten urged us to be wary: “There is no substantial scientific evidence to support the use of freshly squeezed juice for ‘cleansing’ purposes. Humans rely on the liver and the kidneys to separate out potentially toxic byproducts of metabolism.” The National Institutes of Health (NIH) point out that each of your kidneys “is made up of about a million filtering units” that remove about one to two quarts of waste and extra fluid a day via your urine. In other words, your body already has the whole detox thing covered.
Not only thick and firm produce like apples or carrots, or more fibrous leaves like kale, cabbage, or celery, the NC900HDC would take even the thinnest of leaves like spinach or dandelion. Its strong squeeze takes every single drop of nutritious liquid out of your veggies, leaving only fiber to the pulp. This is the reason why it also takes the first position in our list of the best juicers for leafy veggies.
We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
The size of these two containers will help determine how much juice you can make. Some juicers such as the Juiceman JM400 Classic 2 Speed Juicer have a juice pitcher that is less than 1 liter while the pulp container is less than 1.5 liters. Some juicers offer much larger containers such as the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor and Cuisinart CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor.
Juicers vary wildly in price starting as low as $50 to high end models for $1000, but generally, the more you pay, the higher the juice yield and the lower the pulp. How much you’re willing to invest will depend on how often you plan to juice and what type of produce you want to juice. However, it’s important to consider the price of juicing over time on top of the cost of the juicer itself. Juicers that produce lower yields mean you'll be spending a lot more on fruits and veggies over time. Expensive juicers also often come with a lengthy warranty to ensure years of quality juicing.
The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 is one of the best juicers in our review. It is a powerful machine that produces a lot of juice with very little froth output. It is quieter than most other juicers, comes with a 1000 mL pitcher and includes a long three-year warranty. If your counter space is limited, this might not be the right fit for you, but the Cuisinart Juice Extractor makes delicious and nutritious pulp-free juice with very little produce preparation needed.
We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.

If a significant portion of your calories are going to come from juice each day, mix up your produce. Go with veggie-heavy juices, using just a bit of fruit for sweetness. Alternate types of produce, and try something entirely new periodically. Farmers markets and ethnic grocery stores are great spots to find fruits and vegetables you’ve never tasted before.
The width of the chute will determine how much prep time you’ll need. A wide feed chute means less chopping time which means less total time spent juicing. Some of our top picks have at least a 3-inch wide feed chute such as the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor, Breville 800JEXL Juice Fountain Elite 1000-Watt Juice Extractor, and Cuisinart CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor.
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The commercial-grade Omega J8004 juicer does best with hard fruits and vegetables, and was more efficient than popular (and still great) juicers like the Breville Juice Fountain Plus we tested. It’s great for people on a budget with limited counter space. And with a 15-year warranty, the machine is built to last. In our tests, the J8004 extracted a fair amount of both green juice and carrot-apple juice, falling in the middle of the pack for both tests.


When it comes to super convenient press juicer, you’re looking for something that is easy to use, juices fast, and can be tucked away without any effort. Most importantly, it needs to be an easy to clean juicer, so you can juice in a hurry. These are all features that you’ll find in this juicer, and maybe that’s why its been consistently rated as one of the top rated press juicers in 2013 and 2014

The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
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