Juicing advocates advise that you start with a basic, centrifugal juicer-only model so you can get the hang out of juicing. You can then move on to the multitasking masticating and triturating ones as soon as you become adept at juice extraction. If your looking for more in-depth juicer reviews or juicer comparisons, click here to check out the top reviews.
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The gist: The Omega is the creme-de-la-creme of masticating (slow-speed) juicers. Since it processes at a slower speed, you won't miss out on any nutrients. You can juice anything from fruits and vegetables to leafy greens— but it doesn't stop there. The Omega will also turn nuts into nut butter (homemade peanut butter anyone?), grind coffee beans, make pasta, frozen desserts, baby food... to be honest, we're not sure there's much it can't do. Additionally, its slow speed method makes for a super quiet juicing experience.   
Assembling this machine is relatively straightforward, as most of the parts go in a logical location and are easy to click in and out of place. This machine does have an extra piece beneath the filter bowl that we have not seen on any other machine – a black ring, which Cuisinart's manual refers to as the "foam management filter disk." Considering that this machine produces little froth, we can assume this part does its job well. Some grater baskets are difficult to insert or remove, but this one goes on and off easily while still feeling secure.
The Slowstar has a proprietary “Duoblade” auger, which has two cutting edges to chop and crush more with each rotation than single edges can. The motor uses a three-gear system that allows it to turn slowly but with plenty of torque; in our testing, we found that this translates to low-temperature juice with maximum yields from even low-moisture greens like kale.
If water is overflowing, the water reservoir is overfilled. There is a drain hole in the rear of the coffeemaker to prevent overfilling. If the overflow is coffee, you may have used more than one tablespoon of coffee per cup of water or not fully seated either the brew basket and/or the carafe underneath the brew basket. Make sure you have correctly aligned the brew basket and the carafe and are using the correct amount of coffee grounds. Overflowing may happen more frequently with decaffeinated, flavored and finely-ground coffee. Overflowing may occur if the paper filter collapses inside the brew basket. Use a good quality paper filter.

Juicing is a powerful dietary practice used by a quickly-growing amount of people to lose weight fast, get proper nutrition, and help fuel their healthy lifestyles. If you planning on introducing juicing into your diet, or perhaps already have, then you are well-aware of the staggering number of juicers available on the market now. Finding the best juicer for you is a process that involves careful consideration of the benefits of juicing, the types of juicers available, and your personal budget.

In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.


Omega’s newest vertical masticating cold juicer the VSJ843 is a great choice if you plan to juice leafy greens often and want easy clean up and easy storage. Standing at a squat 15.5 inches, this quiet and low profile juicer will easily fit under low-hanging cabinets or tuck away in a closet too. It’s also available in several colors and two different shapes to suit your style. This juicer’s large feed tube and auger work faster than other masticating juicers and easily handled all produce types from whole leaves of kale to strawberries, carrots, and apples. We got high yields of perfectly smooth juice with little to no pulp. The auger design also makes it much easier to clean than typical masticating juicers; Omega’s “Easy Clean” feature continually sweeps away pulp as you juice so most surfaces just need a quick rinse in between produce types. It worked quickly and quietly and can also be used to make nut milks, frozen fruit sorbets and smoothies. This model comes with a 15-year warranty and is perfect for frequent quality juicing of leafy greens and other produce with easy cleanup.
The Breville’s pulverizing power made short order of whole beets and carrots, and we cut apples in half to prep them ready for juicing. Other machines require much more prep time, as they can only manage hard produce in small pieces. We found the Breville can juice anything if it fits down the chute, and it does so very efficiently. It creates very little pulp and froth, so you know you’re getting the most out of your fruits and veggies. The included pitcher is tall, and its special juicer nozzle opening prevents juice dripping on your countertops. It also has an attached froth separator, which strains your juice for you. Its seven parts are easy to assemble, but only five are dishwasher safe.

Dietitian and nutrition writer Sharon Palmer told us that a juicer “should be easy to use, take apart, clean, and store.” Most of the juicers took about 10 minutes to assemble. The $300 Breville and the $400 Hurom both came mostly assembled, but the Tribest ($250) didn’t — and we found its instructions confusing and difficult to follow. KitchenAid’s $300 juicer attachment was hands-down the worst, requiring a full 20 minutes to assemble and almost causing injury thanks to its exposed blade.


Health- and budget-conscious consumers: It’s time for a fresh start! BLACK+DECKER introduces this powerful 400-watt juice extractor that will make quick work of your favorite fresh fruits and vegetables from apples and oranges to carrots and tomatoes—without putting the squeeze on your wallet. With a high quality strainer and stainless steel blades, pulp is separated out while nothing but natural, nutritious juice is effortlessly strained into the 300-ml pitcher below. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a cinch! More time for you to enjoy the fruits of (very) little labor.
Chef Liana Green told us that a good juicer can “juice green leafy vegetables and produce a high yield from ingredients.” The most efficient juicers will squeeze your fruits and veggies dry. The centrifugal juicers averaged a speedy two minutes per glass of juice, but they also tended to be quite messy, splattering juice everywhere if we placed our own glasses beneath the juice spouts. The cold-press juicers were generally quieter and neater during juicing, leaving us with a much cleaner countertop — but they required about seven minutes to fill one glass.
The Hurom’s feed chute is made of opaque plastic, meaning you can’t see what’s happening as you feed produce into the juicer — is it making weird noises because it’s about to jam, or is it powering through a particularly stringy piece of celery? The chute also had a narrower mouth than most of our finalists, requiring us to quarter our apples and lemons before adding them. Not a dealbreaker, but we preferred larger, more transparent chutes as they require a little less prep work and you can see what’s going on.
Twin-gear juicers: For greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, a twin-gear juicer extracts the most juice. Twin-gear juicers are also the most expensive models, often costing over $500. As the name suggests, two gears work together to crush the cell walls of the vegetable and extract the juice. They’re best for greens and other tough fibrous vegetables and not great for fruit.
And the Tribest Slowstar doesn’t just juice. It also comes with a “homogenizing” mincer attachment that grinds without extracting liquid—useful for making sorbets, nut butters, and more. I haven’t used the machine for anything other than making juice, so I can’t attest to its food-chopping and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making abilities, but you can see it in action in this DiscountJuicers.com video. The separate bowl attachment fits onto the base, using the auger to pulverize the food and push it through a large chute without a screen.
Cuisinart’s CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor is one of our top picks because it offers quite a lot of bang for your buck. For less than $150, you get a 3-inch feed chute, a BPA-free machine, a 2-liter pulp container, a safety locking mechanism, an anti-drip flow spout, a 1-liter juice pitcher, die-cast stainless steel housing, a 1000-watt motor, 5-speed control with LED lights, and wait for it… a 3-year warranty. Now, what other juicer offers all that?
Juicing advocates advise that you start with a basic, centrifugal juicer-only model so you can get the hang out of juicing. You can then move on to the multitasking masticating and triturating ones as soon as you become adept at juice extraction. If your looking for more in-depth juicer reviews or juicer comparisons, click here to check out the top reviews.
These are also manual citrus juicers. They have an arm on left/right side that you have to pull down to force the juice out of the fruit. The mechanism is quite simple. You put a half-cut fruit on the bottom squeezing part and then use the handle to pull down the top squeezing part onto that forcefully to press the juice out. The arms are mostly made out of metal and on some low-cost models they can break with undue force. They are also known as citrus presses because there is no reaming action involved in it.
Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
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