Unlike fast juicers which spins at more than 10,000 rpm to extract juice, this machine does the job with an auger turning and squeezing the fruits/veggies against the chamber wall. This minimizes exposure of the juice to the air, thus preventing oxidation of the nutrients in it. Plus, with a slow speed, you don’t have to worry about the little enzymic biological molecules being “boiled up” by the heat from the motor and destroyed.
"Love it, love it, love it. Why'd I wait so long??? I love everything about this juicer (except maybe the extra time it takes to make all that juice from the leafy greens, but you know what, it's time well spent because it's SO relaxing watching healthy juice being created as you spin the lever). I'm ditching my centrifugal juicer forever. I set up the base of this unit on my counter permanently which means about a 1 minute set up time (and probably 2-3 minutes to take apart and rinse off). Unlike the bigger, heavier juicers, these smaller pieces are so easy to wash and manage and store, light and small it all fits in a drawer and doesn't take up half of my cabinet space. And it juices most everything. I make citrus juice, cucumber/celerey juice, etc. I get about 1 cup of spinach juice from those 1lb. containers, than I freeze the spinach fiber in tablespoon sizes and throw in my smoothies (especially good with bananas) or in my soups/stocks/eggs. As for the turning of the lever, you will turn it for a while, more than you'd like to in this fast paced society, but it is effortless and like I said, fun to watch the juice produce through the clear plastic cylinder. Time passes quickly. I imagine too that the more I do this the quicker I'll become. It also pieces together with such ease and safety (so great for kids!!!)..."

Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
Juicing advocates advise that you start with a basic, centrifugal juicer-only model so you can get the hang out of juicing. You can then move on to the multitasking masticating and triturating ones as soon as you become adept at juice extraction. If your looking for more in-depth juicer reviews or juicer comparisons, click here to check out the top reviews.
This is also a relatively powerful machine that doesn't require you to make a ton of cuts to your produce. We dropped two halves of a red delicious apple down the chute, and the machine easily juiced it. When it came time for us to test the hard produce, we were able to drop full beets into the tube and they juiced with little to no pressing needed on the food pusher. Some of the juicers sprayed juice, froth or pulp out their backside, getting the counter and walls dirty. This juicer had no difficulty maintaining the waste and was easy to clean.
The Hamilton Beach 67650A Juice Extractor comes with a useful 20-ounce container/pitcher, but the tall design also means that there's plenty of room for your own receptacle under the spout. Although Hamilton Beach doesn't give an actual size for the pulp bin, it is more than adequate. As is common with modern juicers, the removable parts are dishwasher safe.
I researched and compared several mid priced juicers to the most expensive I could find. $150 was the most I wanted to spend because I recently bought a Vita-Mix blender ($500+). I finally decided on the Breville Juice Fountain Plus JE 95XL (850 watts). But Bed, Bath and Beyond, failed to have it it stock. I made it out there without calling to see if they had it in stock and again, they did not. Not wanting to leave empty handed, I started looking at some of the other juicers they had. That's when I came across the Cuisinart CJE-1000.

Also, we realize that $300-plus is a lot to spend on a small appliance, but we’ve found that paying a bit more for your machine up front is worth doing. Juicing is a costly habit no matter how you do it. Although the initial investment on our pick is high, you won’t be throwing money out with partially extracted, soggy pulp. You can also check eBay and Craigslist for used juicers, especially Omegas and Huroms, because they’ve been around a while. A lot of people sell their machines after realizing they’re not ready to give up the money, counter space, or time required to make juice regularly. You won’t be able to take advantage of the warranty, but you can get really good deals (and even resell yours if you get tired of it).
Chef Liana Green told us that a good juicer can “juice green leafy vegetables and produce a high yield from ingredients.” The most efficient juicers will squeeze your fruits and veggies dry. The centrifugal juicers averaged a speedy two minutes per glass of juice, but they also tended to be quite messy, splattering juice everywhere if we placed our own glasses beneath the juice spouts. The cold-press juicers were generally quieter and neater during juicing, leaving us with a much cleaner countertop — but they required about seven minutes to fill one glass.
There are plenty of juicers available between $60 and $160. We tested ten products within this range and found more expensive juicers are not necessarily better. Perks like multiple speed settings, a long warranty and an included pitcher appeared at several different price points, as did the absence of accessories. We advise shopping the features instead of letting price alone guide you.
You should expect your juicer to have ample capabilities in storing the juice that it produces from your fruits and vegetables. Many juicers feature built-in juice collection containers, while others simply utilize an outlet which allows any container of your choosing to be used. You should consider your personal preference when considering this feature, and try to imagine how you may be using your juicer the most. If, for instance, you plan on making many servings of juice at once, you’d likely want to find a model that allowed for the easy use of custom containers. If you plan on juicing only a few servings at a time, maybe just enough for a day, you’d likely be best served by looking for juicers with built-in juicing storage containers.
If you're looking to get into the home-juicing game — good for you! You're doing something great for your health and will also probably save a ton of money on store-bought juices that can cost up to $12 per 12 oz. bottle. However, when it comes to making your own juices, the kind of juicer you use can really make or break your experience. Don't worry, we're here to help. To start, we compiled a list of the top-rated juicers according to Amazon reviews. 
While its blade chamber is super effective for firm fruits and veggies like carrots or apples, it doesn’t work that well on separated thin leaves. It spins and sends most of the leaves into the pulp collector before even shredding them. You can create some juice by packing the leaves together, but it still wastes too much of the veggies to consider it worth the effort.
The machine’s individual parts have smoother surfaces than those on the older Omega VRT400, making this machine easier to clean. While cleaning the unit, I didn’t need to use the included cleaning brush at all; I just hosed down the parts with the spray nozzle on my sink. Our top pick takes a bit more effort to clean because it has small dimples at the bottom of the juicing screen, requiring use of the included brush to release all pulp.
The Omega VRT400HDS is a masticating juicer—preferred by many for releasing more enzyme rich juices—but makes use of a vertical design to allow a more streamlined juicing experience. This vertical design allows for more efficient pressure to be applied, as well as being a more compact design. This juicer is great if you’re serious about juicing, and have a diet that requires high-volumes of fresh-squeezed juice.
The commercial-grade Omega J8004 juicer does best with hard fruits and vegetables, and was more efficient than popular (and still great) juicers like the Breville Juice Fountain Plus we tested. It’s great for people on a budget with limited counter space. And with a 15-year warranty, the machine is built to last. In our tests, the J8004 extracted a fair amount of both green juice and carrot-apple juice, falling in the middle of the pack for both tests.

Are you looking for a quick daily juice to take on your commute or something packed with all kinds of unusual ingredients to enjoy on a luxurious weekend morning? To make the most out of your juicer, get a head start by researching recipes involving your favorite ingredients. There are lots of online guides for beginners. The last thing you want to do is purchase a juicer and have it gather dust because you got sick of straight carrot juice.
There are several other juicers in the market that warrant a look at. Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to review them. You might want to check them out: Super Angel Pro Stainless Steel Juicer, Tribest Greenstar Elite GSE-5050 Jumbo Twin Gear Cold Press Juice Extractor, Green Power KPE1304 Twin Gear Juicer, VonShef Professional Powerful Wide Mouth Whole Fruit Juicer Machine 700W, and BLACK+DECKER JE2200B Fruit & Vegetable Juicer.

Regardless of which juicer you end up buying, the fact that you are shopping for one speaks volumes. You are likely among the growing number of people who have realized the ‘typical’ diet is a poor one. Healthcare is so inter-related with proper diet and nutrition that is shouldn’t even be considered a separate facet of our lives. Hippocrates, regarded as many to be the father of modern medicine, was quoted as saying ‘Let  food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” This ancient Greek quote certainly may be outdated, but with the growing awareness of the dangers of modern diets and food ingredients, it’s never been more relevant that it is today.
And the Tribest Slowstar doesn’t just juice. It also comes with a “homogenizing” mincer attachment that grinds without extracting liquid—useful for making sorbets, nut butters, and more. I haven’t used the machine for anything other than making juice, so I can’t attest to its food-chopping and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making abilities, but you can see it in action in this DiscountJuicers.com video. The separate bowl attachment fits onto the base, using the auger to pulverize the food and push it through a large chute without a screen.
Features: Low Speed Juice Extractor Product Description Adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet is a great idea, and the Hamilton Beach Low Speed Juice Extractor can help keep you going strong, whether you're adding juicing to your lifestyle or just love a fresh glass of juice to start your day. Having a juice extractor at home makes it easy to prepare delicious, wholesome juices using your favorite fruits and vegetables with no added ingredients or preservatives. And the low-speed, quiet motor is perfect for extracting all the goodness from vegetables, fruits, leafy greens, and wheatgrass. This juicer assembles very quickly with a few twists. When you are ready to juice, simply plug it in, set up the juice and pulp cups, turn it on, and begin adding fruit or vegetables to the chute. The slow juicer's masticating action crushes and s...

Since there are nine parts that need to be disassembled and cleaned after each juicing session, it can take a little longer to hand wash this juicer. While Cuisinart states that these parts can be washed on the top rack of a dishwasher, they recommend hand washing to prevent warping. It can be really difficult cleaning the mesh cylinder that surrounds the grater, but fortunately this juicer comes with a cleaning brush, which works effectively to unplug those holes fast. If you’d prefer fewer parts to take apart and wash might want to look at the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB, which works well and has only five parts to clean.
No matter what type of juicer you purchase, you’ll end up facing the issue of dealing with the fibrous pulp that is left over. There are many juicers that are marketed specifically as containing ‘pulp-ejection systems’. While this is by no means a lie, it is a bit of an exaggeration of the truth. It would be like a car salesman advertising a car by saying it had an engine exhaust system. Sure, it does, in fact, have such a system—but so does every other car. In reality, every juicer has some sort of ‘pulp ejection’ system. The same can be said for nearly every product for sale to consumers, and marketers will often cling to anything before they fail to mention something that makes their product unique. You shouldn’t avoid juicers marketed as having ‘pulp ejection systems’, but it’s also not advisable to buy based on that label.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
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