Equipped with a 1000-watt powerful motor, this easy-to-use juice extractor makes it exceptionally convenient to enjoy fresh, healthy fruit and vegetable juice from the comfort of home. The unit's large 3-inch feeding chute can accommodate whole apples, pears, and other large-size fruits and vegetables (extra-large items may need to be cut into smaller pieces first).

To get that tasty juice out of your favorite fruits and veggies you might need an appliance that can make your work easy. That appliance can either be a citrus juicer or a juice extractor. They both will get you juice but differ in terms of mechanism. A juice extractor first cuts the fruits or vegetables and rotates/spins them at a very high speed that separates seeds, skin, and pulp from the juice. A simple citrus juicer doesn’t provide many features like a juice extractor and is much cheaper than the extractor.
In our testing, we focused on making green juice from 8 ounces each of curly kale and green grapes. This test showed us how each machine handled both soft fruit and tough greens. Fibrous greens are hard to break down, and a high-quality juicer will squeeze more juice from leaves than cheaper models. Soft fruit, like seedless grapes, is a challenge for juicers for the opposite reason—it lacks the fiber that helps the juicer pull the fruit completely through the chamber, and can gum up the works.
Citrus juicers are an entirely different breed type of juicers. These juicers are designed specifically for the juicing of citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruits. These juicers are often much less expensive than masticating or centrifugal juicers but are also much less versatile. Many citrus juicers are manual press juicers, where a lever-type arm is clamped down on top of a half of a citrus fruit, which is first positioned on a sharp pointed like form. The press applies pressure on the fruit, which is squeezed down onto the sharp, cone-line device. This cone-like device presses into the center of the fruit, driving the innards outwards.
There are other features which give you convenience. A juicer that has a large feeding tube, for instance, means you can put in large chunks, enabling you to skip the tedious chore of chopping your produce into small pieces. A large disposal spout is also a good feature as large spouts do not easily get clogged up and have the added advantage of producing a higher volume of juice.
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.

Reasonable footprint: Juicers can be rather in-your-face appliances, depending on size and noise level. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space. The oval bases hover around 7 to 8 inches in diameter. You can tuck a vertical juicer into a corner quite easily, though they are generally tall (about 16 to 18 inches) and require cabinet clearance. Because horizontal juicers can hog a lot of space, we preferred vertical juicers.

Do you enjoy the finer things in life? Are you looking for the ‘Rolls Royce’ of juicers? If so, look no further than the Super angel all stainless steel twin gear juicer. As its name suggests, its made from 100% stainless steel metal, which puts it into a class of its own. Stainless steel has awesome benefits apart from the fact that its super sexy looking – its also extremely durable and very easy to maintain. We also believe that juice tastes better when its come from stainless steel (as opposed to plastics). This juicer is also the number one performer when it comes to juicing leafy greens, so click here to read our review and discover more about the beez neez of juicers… 
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