Yes, the Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fast and popular. But this centrifugal juicer paled in comparison with the slow juicers we tested. The yields were low and it was the least effective at juicing greens. In my one-bedroom apartment, you can’t hear the television in the living room when a Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fired up in the kitchen. It also has only a one-year warranty.


The gist: We know, we know—another Breville model. What can we say? We can't argue with quality, and we certainly don't think quality should be an issue for those with less counter-space—which is why we give you the Breville BJE200XL Compact Juicer. The Breville Compact takes up far less space than other Breville models while still boasting the same juicing capabilities. It has a 700-watt motor and operates at a single speed of 14,000rpm. It has the same extra-wide 3-inch feed chute as the other Breville models, so don't let its small size fool you—this thing can still take down whole fruits. 
John Kohler and Matt Shook both recommended that we include a few different vertical single-auger juicers to test. All of the vertical and horizontal single-auger models we brought in to test promised low speeds, minimal oxidation, and high juice yields. We also brought in two centrifugal-style juicers to compare yield and quality. These didn’t do well in our tests and ultimately we recommend only single-auger juicers.
Making cocktails at home doesn’t have to be complicated, but we can all aspire to more than dumping margarita mix in a blender. Over the past two years, we’ve spent 70 hours researching bar tools, speaking with some of the top bartenders in the country and testing five dozen models to bring you this guide to the absolute best items for home mixology.
The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.

The Tribest Slowstar, a vertical single-auger, slow-press juicer, is the most versatile juicer we’ve found, efficiently handling thick greens, fruits, and root vegetables. In our tests, it yielded the highest amount of green juice and nearly the highest amount of hard-vegetable juice with low effort, experienced no motor jams, and generated minimal foam. It also has a generous feed-tube opening, which makes for quicker prep and easier juicing. This quiet machine is backed with a 10-year warranty that covers the motor and parts, one of the better guarantees among the juicers we tested.

Equipped with a 1000-watt powerful motor, this easy-to-use juice extractor makes it exceptionally convenient to enjoy fresh, healthy fruit and vegetable juice from the comfort of home. The unit's large 3-inch feeding chute can accommodate whole apples, pears, and other large-size fruits and vegetables (extra-large items may need to be cut into smaller pieces first).
It's entirely possible that you're curious about buying a juicer. In case you haven't heard, juicing is trending. We're not talking about the Barry Bonds type of juicing, but the Jack LaLanne type. Recent claims have promised that drinking fresh-pressed juices can help you lose weight, boost immunity, prevent cancer and cleanse your system. Whether that's entirely true remains to be seen, but it can't hurt, right?

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Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.
Assembling this machine is relatively straightforward, as most of the parts go in a logical location and are easy to click in and out of place. This machine does have an extra piece beneath the filter bowl that we have not seen on any other machine – a black ring, which Cuisinart's manual refers to as the "foam management filter disk." Considering that this machine produces little froth, we can assume this part does its job well. Some grater baskets are difficult to insert or remove, but this one goes on and off easily while still feeling secure.
The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.
Sifting through the endless numbers of juicers can be tough, and without a concise frame of reference, you’ll likely drift aimlessly. This guide is meant to serve as a clearly-outlined reference for those looking to compare the best juicers on the market. Make no mistake, these juicers aren’t the cheapest juicers available, but they are without doubt among the best. For those already familiar with the types of juicers, the benefits of juicing, and all the other information that will be covered in this article, you can find a quick reference table below:
Not only thick and firm produce like apples or carrots, or more fibrous leaves like kale, cabbage, or celery, the NC900HDC would take even the thinnest of leaves like spinach or dandelion. Its strong squeeze takes every single drop of nutritious liquid out of your veggies, leaving only fiber to the pulp. This is the reason why it also takes the first position in our list of the best juicers for leafy veggies.

Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.


Of course, it's important to note that this is an entry-level model, so it is lacking in some features. For example, it only has two settings - "on" and "off " — so it'll either juice what you put in there, or it won't. It's also a little loud, and according to some reviews, can get messy. In general, this is best for those just getting into juicing and who don't necessarily know if it'll be a long-term investment for them.


"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."
The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
Centrifugal (pronounced sin-tra-fue-gal) are the types of juicers that many people are most familiar with. These juicers have been popular for the longest time, and most closely resemble a blender. These juicers utilize a special kind of force called centrifugal force, which is closely related to things that rotate. Basically, it means that if you spin something around really fast, it’s going to move away from the point around which it is spinning. If you spin your arm around in circles quickly, you can feel your hand swelling. This is because the centrifugal force is acting on the fluids in your body, moving them away from your should—which is the center of rotation—and towards your hand. What this Newtonian tangent means, is that centrifugal juicers apply force to your fruits and vegetables by spinning around really fast!
Born and raised in Paris, the land of unapologetic butter, Francois has spent the last 20 years shaping the American culinary world behind the scenes. He was a buyer at Williams-Sonoma, built the Food Network online store, managed product assortments for Rachael Ray's site, started two meal delivery businesses and runs a successful baking blog. When he's not baking a cake or eating his way through Europe, Francois enjoys sharing cooking skills with cooks of all levels. Rules he lives by: "Use real butter" and "Nothing beats a sharp knife."
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
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