Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.

Centrifugal: This is the most common type of juicer sold at kitchen stores and big box retailers. It’s the most affordable. Once you feed in the vegetables or fruit, it shreds and spins very fast so that the pulp and bits of fruit and vegetables are caught by a strainer or filter and the juice spins out. Centrifugal juicers can be loud. And, because they are fast, they heat up, which can affect the nutritional value of the juice.
Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
Breville’s top of the line commercial-grade centrifugal juicer doesn’t disappoint. Boasting a super strong and fast 1000-watt motor with 2 speed controls this machine plows through piles of fruits and vegetables in a flash and gets highly rated juicer reviews. The variable speed options give you more control–Breville recommends using the high speed setting (13,000 RPM) for hard fruits and vegetables and low setting (6,500 RPM) for softer fruits and vegetables. While it does make noise equivalent to a blender, it works so quickly you won’t have to listen long. A 3” feed tube lets you juice whole fruits and vegetables with significantly less prep time. This juicer is built to last with titanium reinforced cutting blades that stay sharp longer and made entirely of die-cast materials but be aware that it only has a 1 year warranty. Breville does sell replacement parts on their website. We love the included 1-liter juice jug with built in froth separator and cover. This juicer is perfect for juicing in bulk–it has a large capacity external pulp container so you can juice piles of fruits and vegetables with no breaks. It didn’t extract as much juice out of kale as other models we tried did; but unless your juicing emphasis is on leafy greens this juicer is perfect for high volume juicing.
John Kohler and Matt Shook both recommended that we include a few different vertical single-auger juicers to test. All of the vertical and horizontal single-auger models we brought in to test promised low speeds, minimal oxidation, and high juice yields. We also brought in two centrifugal-style juicers to compare yield and quality. These didn’t do well in our tests and ultimately we recommend only single-auger juicers.

If water is overflowing, the water reservoir is overfilled. There is a drain hole in the rear of the coffeemaker to prevent overfilling. If the overflow is coffee, you may have used more than one tablespoon of coffee per cup of water or not fully seated either the brew basket and/or the carafe underneath the brew basket. Make sure you have correctly aligned the brew basket and the carafe and are using the correct amount of coffee grounds. Overflowing may happen more frequently with decaffeinated, flavored and finely-ground coffee. Overflowing may occur if the paper filter collapses inside the brew basket. Use a good quality paper filter.
We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one!
To look for the best juicers to test, we read editorial reviews of juicers from Good Housekeeping, Real Simple, and Top Ten Reviews, and watched video reviews and comparisons of new models. We also looked at the offerings from the four main juicer companies at the forefront of juicing technology: Tribest, Kuvings, Omega, and Hurom. John Kohler said that these companies innovate and improve upon their technology, and the cheaper versions are often Chinese knockoffs. Watching hours of side-by-side comparison videos and reviews also helped narrow what to include from each brand.

In our tests, the Tribest Slowstar consistently outperformed its competitors, delivering high yields of delicious juices from a variety of fruits and vegetables with minimal effort. Compared with other juicers we tested, the Slowstar is quieter and less likely to jam, and it generates less foam. With an impressive 10-year warranty on the motor and parts, we think it’s a worthwhile investment for people who juice regularly.
The gist: The Omega is the creme-de-la-creme of masticating (slow-speed) juicers. Since it processes at a slower speed, you won't miss out on any nutrients. You can juice anything from fruits and vegetables to leafy greens— but it doesn't stop there. The Omega will also turn nuts into nut butter (homemade peanut butter anyone?), grind coffee beans, make pasta, frozen desserts, baby food... to be honest, we're not sure there's much it can't do. Additionally, its slow speed method makes for a super quiet juicing experience.   
I researched and compared several mid priced juicers to the most expensive I could find. $150 was the most I wanted to spend because I recently bought a Vita-Mix blender ($500+). I finally decided on the Breville Juice Fountain Plus JE 95XL (850 watts). But Bed, Bath and Beyond, failed to have it it stock. I made it out there without calling to see if they had it in stock and again, they did not. Not wanting to leave empty handed, I started looking at some of the other juicers they had. That's when I came across the Cuisinart CJE-1000.

Masticating juicers use an Auger, which is very similar in appearance to a drill-bit. Mos feature some sort of cork-screw type design that chops up food while pressing it forward at the same time. This is a very efficient means of applying force and therefore requires the less powerful motor. Typically, a masticating juicer’s auger is made of a high-density plastic like the GE Ultem found on the Breville 800JEXL. the use of these durable materials is favorable, considering the auger is the part doing all the work.
Easy to assemble, easy to use, extremely fast juicing, easy to clean, compact, lightweight, and beautiful to look at. The Breville Compact Juice Fountain is our pick for Best Compact Juicer. It boasts a 3” feed tube that lets you juice whole apples in 3 seconds flat as well as a very handy 25 oz Juice Jug with storage lid and optional froth separator. This juicer is all about speed, convenience, and simplicity–we highly recommend it for those who are tight on space but want to juice frequently and quickly. It’s titanium cutting disc and high-powered 700-watt motor pack a punch (but also make a blender-volume level of noise.) We couldn’t believe how quickly it juiced everything from strawberries to whole apples to whole carrots and kale. As with most centrifugal juicers, it didn’t yield as much juice from kale as masticating models but the difference was slight. A very high-design machine, we also love the internal pulp container –it conserves counter space and keeps cleanup and assembly simple. However, this isn’t the juicer for you if you plan to juice in bulk; you’ll need to pause to disassemble the juicer to empty the pulp container. As with all the juicers we reviewed, it comes with a cleaning brush and the parts are dishwasher safe. At only $99 it’s also an incredible value and comes with a 1 year warranty.
The juicer's side has an indent that molds perfectly to the shape of the pitcher so you always know where to place it. The pitcher lid has an opening at the top that allows juice to drain from the juicer's nozzle directly into the pitcher. There is also a nifty piece of plastic that prevents any froth from making its way from the pitcher to your cup. In our testing, we found that this separator worked well to keep our juice froth-free so you could enjoy it right away. If you prefer froth in your juice, you can remove the separator.
Another important consideration is where you plan to store your juicer and how easily you’ll want to access it. While horizontal-masticating juicers can churn out high volumes of juice, you may not have space for them. Plus, they tend to weigh more so tend to be difficult to move from closet to counter. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space and can often tuck under cabinets. Lightweight centrifugal models are perfect if you need to move your juicer from storage space to counter. Just make sure whatever model you pick can handle the volume of juice you plan to make: smaller juicers equal smaller amounts of juice per batch.
The Slowstar has a proprietary “Duoblade” auger, which has two cutting edges to chop and crush more with each rotation than single edges can. The motor uses a three-gear system that allows it to turn slowly but with plenty of torque; in our testing, we found that this translates to low-temperature juice with maximum yields from even low-moisture greens like kale.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
Juicing is an amazing way to get loads of hard-to-come-by micronutrients and natural enzymes into your system, all while lessening the workload for your digestive system. Producing this juice means chopping, slicing, and squeezing your fruits and veggies into tiny little pieces to release to the most juice possible. When you are dealing with such small food particles, you will quickly find they have a strong tendency to get stuck in cracks and crevasses.
Reviews.com has an advertising relationship with some of the offers included on this page. However, the rankings and listings of our reviews, tools and all other content are based on objective analysis. For more information, please check out our full Advertiser Disclosure. Reviews.com strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. The information in our reviews could be different from what you find when visiting a financial institution, service provider or a specific product’s website. All products are presented without warranty.
The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.
We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
KitchenAid makes a juicing attachment for the Artisan stand mixer, the Masticating Juicer Attachment, as well as the standalone Maximum Extraction Juicer. In our research, we found that the Maximum Extraction Juicer didn’t compare to our picks in yields, extraction, build quality, or warranty (one-year limited). We don’t think it’s worth testing because it has too many shortcomings for its high price. The juicing attachment for the Artisan mixer is cheaper than a full juicer, but it gets poor reviews on Amazon for being hard to use and clean, and it seems to have difficulty with hard roots and vegetables.
When your fruits or vegetables are put into a centrifugal juicer, they are grated into smaller slices and pieces through sharp teeth-like blades. These blades are usually found on the bottom of a basket-like part, such as the Nutridisk of the Breville 800JEXL, and less efficient than the augers found on masticating juicers. Juice is extracted during this process by through the pressure of centrifugal force as the ground-up parts of the fruits and vegetables are pressed against walls of a filter. The faster these juicers spin, the greater the amount of force applied during this process, and the great the amount of juice that is extracted. A typical Centrifugal juicer will have a motor with 800 watts of power or more spin at nearly 15,000 RPM and are regarded as being very noisy. The juices produced by these juicers have shorter shelf lives due to increased aeration associated with centrifugal separation processes.
Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.

Be prepared to clean your juicer after every use. Bacteria love to feast on unpasteurized juices, so it’s important to clean your juicer every time you use it. And the sooner the better — the drier it gets, the harder pulp is to remove. During testing, we found that the strainer baskets and pulp spouts tended to need the most attention. So think about how often you’ll use your machine, what kind of fruits and vegetables you’ll be juicing (some leave more behind in your juicer than others), and how much time you’ll have to clean your machine.

Regardless of which juicer you end up buying, the fact that you are shopping for one speaks volumes. You are likely among the growing number of people who have realized the ‘typical’ diet is a poor one. Healthcare is so inter-related with proper diet and nutrition that is shouldn’t even be considered a separate facet of our lives. Hippocrates, regarded as many to be the father of modern medicine, was quoted as saying ‘Let  food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” This ancient Greek quote certainly may be outdated, but with the growing awareness of the dangers of modern diets and food ingredients, it’s never been more relevant that it is today.
The Hurom comes with a lidded pitcher for collecting juice, but its slow-turning auger produced so little splatter that we also had no problem putting our own glass directly under the juice spout. Clean juicing makes for means you’re not beholden to the Hurom’s pitcher, making it easier to juice straight into your to-go cup and reducing counter clean-up. (When we tried this with the Juiceman, we ended up with a foot-wide splatter radius.)
"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."
×