If you're serious about juicing, it's best to get a juicer that fits nicely on your kitchen counter so you can leave it out rather than having to haul it out of a cupboard. That means paying close attention to the dimensions and even the length of the electrical cord. You don't want to buy a juicer that looks great in your kitchen but doesn't have a cord that reaches the outlet.
Of course, it's important to note that this is an entry-level model, so it is lacking in some features. For example, it only has two settings - "on" and "off " — so it'll either juice what you put in there, or it won't. It's also a little loud, and according to some reviews, can get messy. In general, this is best for those just getting into juicing and who don't necessarily know if it'll be a long-term investment for them.

Features: Low Speed Juice Extractor Product Description Adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet is a great idea, and the Hamilton Beach Low Speed Juice Extractor can help keep you going strong, whether you're adding juicing to your lifestyle or just love a fresh glass of juice to start your day. Having a juice extractor at home makes it easy to prepare delicious, wholesome juices using your favorite fruits and vegetables with no added ingredients or preservatives. And the low-speed, quiet motor is perfect for extracting all the goodness from vegetables, fruits, leafy greens, and wheatgrass. This juicer assembles very quickly with a few twists. When you are ready to juice, simply plug it in, set up the juice and pulp cups, turn it on, and begin adding fruit or vegetables to the chute. The slow juicer's masticating action crushes and s...
Warranty: No matter what kind of juicer you're getting, you want it to last. You should always get small appliances with some level of warranty, but normally the longer the warranty, the better. Not only does it show that a company is confident in its product, but it also means that if something does break, you won't have to shell out any extra cash.
The Tribest handled a constant stream of kale and supersoft grapes without gumming up or stalling out, unlike the Hurom Elite, which had to be thrown into reverse a couple of times. In 2015, the yield from one pound of greens and grapes was 12.15 ounces by weight, the highest yield of all the juicers we tested. When we put the Slowstar and the Omega VSJ843 (our runner-up) in a head-to-head 1-pound spinach challenge, the Slowstar produced exactly one ounce more juice than the VSJ843.

Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.


Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.
Centrifugal juicers are also not as efficient as masticating juicers in terms of generating yield. The pulp that comes out of centrifugal juicers is still relatively wet which means that less of the juice is extracted. You cannot count on centrifugal juicers to extract high yields of juice from high-fiber leafy greens like wheat-grass, spinach, and lettuce.
Be prepared to clean your juicer after every use. Bacteria love to feast on unpasteurized juices, so it’s important to clean your juicer every time you use it. And the sooner the better — the drier it gets, the harder pulp is to remove. During testing, we found that the strainer baskets and pulp spouts tended to need the most attention. So think about how often you’ll use your machine, what kind of fruits and vegetables you’ll be juicing (some leave more behind in your juicer than others), and how much time you’ll have to clean your machine.

While juicers like the Omega and the Tribest only filled one-half to two-thirds of a standard 8-ounce drinking glass, the Hurom gave us nearly a full glass. It’s a cold-press juicer, meaning it works a little slower, but is likely to squeeze more from your fruits and veg. You can run the Hurom with one of two filters — “low pulp” and “high pulp” — but our taste-testers reported the low-pulp option was still pretty pulpy. If you’re not a fan of all that fiber, we’d suggest the Breville, below.


The cleaning of this CJE-1000 is easy and fast as there are no nooks and hidden compartments like some juicers have. Shell of the units top is made of high impact ABS, it is very well made and fits perfectly. Cuisinart did excellent job in design how the parts fit – if it is not correctly assembled it will not start. Also, the motor has automatic thermal reset fuse, not like some major and expensive brand which I used to have and will never touch again for that very reason. One day you will overheat the juicer and I you do not have auto thermal reset, you will be shipping it for repairs. Not with this juicer. ThankYou Cuisinart !!!.

Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004. 

Considering the 15-year warranty on the Omega J8004 model’s motor and parts, we think this is the best value juicer you can get compared with cheaper models with shorter warranties. Although its price is more palatable than the Tribest’s, there are some trade-offs. First, the J8004 is quite big, requiring a 16-by-7-inch space on the counter. It also isn’t great with softer, juicy fruits, which get gummy and block the juicer; you’ll need to alternate adding different types of produce when juicing with this machine to keep it running. And, as we mentioned earlier, its feed tube is an inch narrower than the Tribest’s, which makes a difference in how much prep work you need to do with vegetables. Because the J8004 is a budget machine, you’ll save about $150 up front, but you may lose some of those savings in juice left behind in the pulp you toss when juicing things like kale. Compared with the rest of the competition, however, we still think the J8004 extracts more juice from produce.

When your fruits or vegetables are put into a centrifugal juicer, they are grated into smaller slices and pieces through sharp teeth-like blades. These blades are usually found on the bottom of a basket-like part, such as the Nutridisk of the Breville 800JEXL, and less efficient than the augers found on masticating juicers. Juice is extracted during this process by through the pressure of centrifugal force as the ground-up parts of the fruits and vegetables are pressed against walls of a filter. The faster these juicers spin, the greater the amount of force applied during this process, and the great the amount of juice that is extracted. A typical Centrifugal juicer will have a motor with 800 watts of power or more spin at nearly 15,000 RPM and are regarded as being very noisy. The juices produced by these juicers have shorter shelf lives due to increased aeration associated with centrifugal separation processes.

The size of these two containers will help determine how much juice you can make. Some juicers such as the Juiceman JM400 Classic 2 Speed Juicer have a juice pitcher that is less than 1 liter while the pulp container is less than 1.5 liters. Some juicers offer much larger containers such as the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor and Cuisinart CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor.
Part of a Healthy Lifestyle* According to the USDA, "The benefits of eating fruits and vegetables daily are undeniable. People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet, are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases, including heart attack and stroke, certain cancers, heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. It's also been proven to reduce the risk of developing kidney stone, decrease bone loss, ease muscle aches, alleviate high blood pressure and add years to your life." * Source: USDA, 2012 "Healthy Eating on a Budget." www.choosemyplate.gov 

No matter what type of juicer you purchase, you’ll end up facing the issue of dealing with the fibrous pulp that is left over. There are many juicers that are marketed specifically as containing ‘pulp-ejection systems’. While this is by no means a lie, it is a bit of an exaggeration of the truth. It would be like a car salesman advertising a car by saying it had an engine exhaust system. Sure, it does, in fact, have such a system—but so does every other car. In reality, every juicer has some sort of ‘pulp ejection’ system. The same can be said for nearly every product for sale to consumers, and marketers will often cling to anything before they fail to mention something that makes their product unique. You shouldn’t avoid juicers marketed as having ‘pulp ejection systems’, but it’s also not advisable to buy based on that label.
Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
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