Some compact juicers collect the pulp in an internal basket, but most others eject the pulp outside of the machine into a container that is specifically sized for the juicer. We recommend purchasing a juice extractor that ejects the pulp externally– this allows you to make larger quantities of juice without having to take extra time to stop your juicer, open it up, and empty the basket. Once you get juicing, you don’t want to have to stop before you’re finished.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
It does a superior, although not perfect, job with hard produce and zips through soft produce easily. It leaves some pulp that doesn't have all the nutritious fluid extracted from it but not enough to be a problem. On the downside, we had to do quite a bit of chopping ahead of time so that the pieces of fruit and vegetables would fit through the food chute. This juicer is easy to care for. It takes only a little time to assemble and clean, and various parts are dishwasher-safe. The machine also comes with a cleaning brush, as well as a froth separator and a tall pitcher. This is a big machine, and it is noisy but at a decibel level comparable with other good-quality juicers. You can get help with the juicer over email, but there is no phone number for customer support.
We got more juice out of the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB than any other machine we tested. All that remained was a small amount of pulp that felt relatively dry to the touch. The Kuvings did an excellent job extracting juice from hard and soft produce in virtually all our tests. Since getting juice is the whole point of a juicer, the Kuvings got top marks.

This machine has a very pleasant look to it and offers a more sophisticated spout than most of the electric juicers we considered. You can adjust it for the speed of juice flow. You remove the lid by pressing your thumb down on a spring-loaded button. This design is different from any of the other juicers and gives it a sophisticated look. The juicer lid is the only one that operates on a hinge. We like this feature as it allows you to keep the lid open, hands-free, when cleaning or leave it open to air-dry after washing.
Centrifugal: This is by far the most popular style of home juicer available due to its lower cost. A centrifugal juicer uses tiny teeth on a rapidly spinning basket to grind up vegetables, then forces the juice out through a fine mesh sieve. This system tends to produce a lot of foam, and doesn’t yield as much as a single-auger juicer. Centrifugal juicers are best for carrots and other hard fruits and vegetables. If you’re not into juicing greens or soft fruits, this is your juicer. And because centrifugal juicers are more affordable than other types, they’re also a good way to see if juicing is something you can stick with. However, if you find yourself juicing frequently, upgrading to a single-auger juicer is worth doing because you’ll make up for the price difference with higher juice yields over time.
The Omega VRT400HDS is a masticating juicer—preferred by many for releasing more enzyme rich juices—but makes use of a vertical design to allow a more streamlined juicing experience. This vertical design allows for more efficient pressure to be applied, as well as being a more compact design. This juicer is great if you’re serious about juicing, and have a diet that requires high-volumes of fresh-squeezed juice.
Lemons and oranges should be peeled unless one wants to consume all those antifungal sprays that are sprayed on many citrus prior to storage. Even DIY home grown organic peel with no chemicals will spoil the taste just because citrus oil in peels is too strong for consumption in quantities – this is why some supermarket citrus juices have this wonderful smell combined with some bitter aftertaste. Citrus oil is good to flavour cakes and treat pimples, but not for drinking.
The machine’s individual parts have smoother surfaces than those on the older Omega VRT400, making this machine easier to clean. While cleaning the unit, I didn’t need to use the included cleaning brush at all; I just hosed down the parts with the spray nozzle on my sink. Our top pick takes a bit more effort to clean because it has small dimples at the bottom of the juicing screen, requiring use of the included brush to release all pulp.
Everyone from Wall Street bankers to Beyoncé is talking about juice cleanses, but registered dietitian Emily Braaten urged us to be wary: “There is no substantial scientific evidence to support the use of freshly squeezed juice for ‘cleansing’ purposes. Humans rely on the liver and the kidneys to separate out potentially toxic byproducts of metabolism.” The National Institutes of Health (NIH) point out that each of your kidneys “is made up of about a million filtering units” that remove about one to two quarts of waste and extra fluid a day via your urine. In other words, your body already has the whole detox thing covered.
Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
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