"I kept putting this item in my cart deciding between this one and the next higher version. My friend had the next size but she also has a very large kitchen and plenty of counter space, while me I have 1/4 of the counter space. After about a month in my basket I decided to give it a try. I'm glad I did buy this compact version, it's perfect for me. I make one container full and clean out the where the pulp is stored. It also stores nicely under my cabinet, which the other version would not. Since this is my first juicer, I'm not sure how 'dry' the pulp should be but to me it's pretty dry. Not something that is bone dry but enough that I can probably make a small ball out of the pulp...mind you I haven't tried it but may. I also juiced Kale and Swiss Chard I saw quite a bit of juice coming out. I did with the recommendation of rolling it up in a small tight ball and it worked. Not sure if it was because the kale and Swiss chard were straight from the garden to the juicer but I definitely did see juice coming out."
Make sure your juicer suits your lifestyle in terms of how quickly, and how loudly they work. Masticating juicers are much quieter than centrifugal juicers so household members remain undisturbed while you get your juice on. If you need to make your juice fresh and fast in the morning, speed may be a concern. Masticating juicers are slower while some centrifugal juicers can juice an apple in just 30 seconds. Juicer models with multiple speeds are helpful because they extract the most juice out of your produce. Slow speeds are great for juicing soft fruits, like grapes and strawberries, while high speeds are better for firmer items like apples and carrots.
Centrifugal juicers grind up produce with tiny teeth on a rapidly spinning basket. The juice is then forced through a fine mesh sieve. This method works quickly but tends to produce a lot of foam which some find unappealing or feel causes oxidization of their juice. Centrifugal juicers work best for juicing carrots, apples, and other hard fruits and vegetables versus high fiber leafy greens like wheatgrass and kale. They’re light, easy to set up and use, and easy to clean with removable dishwasher safe parts. These juicers are speedy but tend to be loud (which could be an issue if you’re juicing early in the morning while people are sleeping).  They’re affordable and great for those just getting into juicing with quality models starting at $50. 
Easy to clean: We’ve found that all juicers have one thing in common—they’re a bit of a pain to clean. The parts aren’t dishwasher safe, so you have to clean the components by hand. And they have a lot of small nooks and crannies that can trap gunk. We looked for vertical juicers that come with specialized brushes to make cleaning easier, and considered horizontal models, like those from Omega, that are a little simpler to clean because the juicing screens aren’t as big.
Features: From the smallest lime to the largest grapefruit, this sleek brushed stainless steel citrus juicer gets out more juice more efficiently. An adjustable auto-reversing reamer features “custom” pulp control settings, and the unique Final-Spin feature maximizes the amount of juice from each piece of fruit. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a breeze. Features: Adjustable reamer with 3 pulp control settings—low, medium, high Auto-reversing universal juicer cone for more efficient juicing Final-Spin feature extracts more juice from pulp Extra-long Snap-Up spout accommodates more glasses and prevents dripping Cover activates Final-Spin feature and protects against dust Brushed stainless steel design Easy-clean dishwasher-safe parts Convenient cord storage Limited 3-year warranty BPA Free
For those just trying out the juicing trend, on a budget, or who will only be juicing every now and then; the Hamilton Beach Big Mouth Pro is an incredible value. Retailing at only $50 it has features that rival much more expensive models. A 3” chute means much less time prepping fruits and vegetables for juicing–it even handled whole carrots and whole apples with no problem. Easy to assemble, clean, and use; this centrifugal model has a 1.1 horsepower motor (equivalent to about 820 watts). It’s small enough to fit under the counter but note that it’s largely made of plastic so it may not have the aesthetic you’re looking for. It comes with a small 20 oz pitcher but the height of the juice spout means it’s simple to use your own pitchers for larger batch juicing (and it has a large external pulp container too). This model did a fantastic job on all our tests and produced high quality, high volume juices–it even handled notoriously tricky to juice kale extremely well. We highly recommend this juicer as a starter model or for those who may not juice often but want the option to. It comes with a 3-year warranty and receives gret reviews online.
If the Breville juice fountain elite is a little too high end for you, but you still want a quality juicer, the Breville juice fountain plus is a great option. This juicer has a great balance of all features- speed, efficiency, simplicity, durability and price, meaning its a great all round centrifugal juicer. Read our review here, and see if you agree with us- its extremely easy to use (and to clean!) while still providing beautiful quality juice at record time. A strong contender…
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.

With four smart fins on its stainless steel juicing cone, the 800CPXL can accommodate most types of citrus: from things as small as limes to larger fruits like grapefruits, and even some non-citrus like pomegranates. There’ll be a learning curve on how to place some of the awkwardly asymmetrical fruits onto the top of the cone so that they come out perfectly and  evenly juiced, but you will most definitely get the hang of it after the 15th orange.
Juicing isn’t for everyone. Registered dietitian Sylvia North warned us that “if you have a clinically diagnosed inflammatory bowel or kidney disease, some nutrients found in high concentrations in green juices may not be appropriate.” If you’re navigating any health challenges, it’s best to talk to your registered dietitian or doctor before you shop for a juicer.
This type of buildup can become a sanitation issue, and also eventually lead to a poor functioning juicer. The best juicers on the market are those that also feature intuitive means of disassembly for cleaning, and provide as much accommodation for use with dishwashers as possible. You should be able to easily get to the core parts of your juicer, such as the Auger, the filter screens, the pulp ejection bin, and the juice containers. This accessibility will allow you to easily and effectively clean your juicer, which will help reduce chances of molds and other unsanitary build ups.
Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control
To look for the best juicers to test, we read editorial reviews of juicers from Good Housekeeping, Real Simple, and Top Ten Reviews, and watched video reviews and comparisons of new models. We also looked at the offerings from the four main juicer companies at the forefront of juicing technology: Tribest, Kuvings, Omega, and Hurom. John Kohler said that these companies innovate and improve upon their technology, and the cheaper versions are often Chinese knockoffs. Watching hours of side-by-side comparison videos and reviews also helped narrow what to include from each brand.
The gist: The Omega is the creme-de-la-creme of masticating (slow-speed) juicers. Since it processes at a slower speed, you won't miss out on any nutrients. You can juice anything from fruits and vegetables to leafy greens— but it doesn't stop there. The Omega will also turn nuts into nut butter (homemade peanut butter anyone?), grind coffee beans, make pasta, frozen desserts, baby food... to be honest, we're not sure there's much it can't do. Additionally, its slow speed method makes for a super quiet juicing experience.   
Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
The best juicers extract as much liquid as possible from fruits and vegetables, leaving behind very little pulp. Machines that leave large amounts of very moist pulp just aren’t doing their job. The same is true for froth. Every juicer makes some froth, but you don't want inches of bubbles – you want a machine that gives you the most juice for your money.
However, considering that it’s the compensation for healthier, more nutritious juices, the 2 minute wait is not exactly a deal breaker. Plus, since the juice is cold-pressed and is exposed to very minimal oxidation, it can be stored up to 72 hours in the fridge. That means you can actually save more time than using a fast juicer, since the juices made with fast machines typically degrade within a couple hours after they’re made.
This juicer does not come with a pitcher, which is atypical in the juicing world. Instead, you simply put a glass beneath its spout and let the juice run into it. It also lacks a strainer, so you get plenty of pulp with the liquid. If you want the extra fiber, that’s great. If you prefer a smoother, less-textured drink, you need to use a strainer of your own as well as a pitcher or other container to capture strained juice. The juicer is somewhat noisy and does vibrate, like most, but it stays securely in place due to its nonskid base. In addition, the machine has two clips on either side to hold the lid firmly in place, which is a nice safety feature.
To get that tasty juice out of your favorite fruits and veggies you might need an appliance that can make your work easy. That appliance can either be a citrus juicer or a juice extractor. They both will get you juice but differ in terms of mechanism. A juice extractor first cuts the fruits or vegetables and rotates/spins them at a very high speed that separates seeds, skin, and pulp from the juice. A simple citrus juicer doesn’t provide many features like a juice extractor and is much cheaper than the extractor.
While most popular juicers on the market today are centrifugal juicers due to their ease-of-use and the fact that they are more commonly used an example of what a juicer is, the other two types do have their advantages over the popular guy. This is especially true if you want to do more with your juicer other than extracting juice from fruits and vegetables.
The gist: For those looking to get the most out of their leafy greens, the Lexen GP27 is the way to *manually* do just that. This juicer is the solution for those that don't want to lay out hundreds for an expensive masticating juicer, but also don't want to settle for a cheap, crummy manual model. As the folks at The Healthy Juicer say, this thing was designed to be "simple, mobile, versatile, and easy to clean." Simple is right. To use, just put a put a juice cup under the spout, place your greens into the chute, and start churning.  Cleaning this thing is a breeze, since all you have to do is unscrew the parts, rinse them off in the sink, and boom—you're done. Thanks to its high juice-yield and cold-press technology, you can rest assured your greens will be nutrient-packed to the max. 
This machine does come with a 1000 mL pitcher, which means it could hold roughly three 12-ounce sodas. Fresh juice does not keep for long, so you typically wouldn’t make lots of it in advance; however, if you are making juice for your family or for the next day or two, it is nice not to have to stop and empty the pulp. You can get through a lot of produce before you need to pause.

For its smart design and features, as well as the brand moniker, the Breville 800CPXL is no doubt a desirable item to have on the countertop in an orange juice loving family’s kitchen, or in a small juice bar. It actually makes sense to have one along with a centrifuge or masticator, because when you only need citrus juice, cleanup is so much easier on the 800CPXL.


Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control
In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.
"I kept putting this item in my cart deciding between this one and the next higher version. My friend had the next size but she also has a very large kitchen and plenty of counter space, while me I have 1/4 of the counter space. After about a month in my basket I decided to give it a try. I'm glad I did buy this compact version, it's perfect for me. I make one container full and clean out the where the pulp is stored. It also stores nicely under my cabinet, which the other version would not. Since this is my first juicer, I'm not sure how 'dry' the pulp should be but to me it's pretty dry. Not something that is bone dry but enough that I can probably make a small ball out of the pulp...mind you I haven't tried it but may. I also juiced Kale and Swiss Chard I saw quite a bit of juice coming out. I did with the recommendation of rolling it up in a small tight ball and it worked. Not sure if it was because the kale and Swiss chard were straight from the garden to the juicer but I definitely did see juice coming out."
A "smoking motor" is usually caused from binding between the cutting unit clutch and the cutting assembly which connects to the motor. Unplug the blender and allow to cool. Once the blender is cool, check the cutting assembly (see the Use and Care instructions for your model for a parts diagram) to see if the blades "spin freely." Be careful, the blades are sharp. If the blades do not spin freely, the cutting unit needs to be replaced. Once the blender base (without container) is cool, plug it in and turn it on to see if it works properly. (If the unit was not turned off when the cutting unit locked, the motor could be damaged.)
The size of these two containers will help determine how much juice you can make. Some juicers such as the Juiceman JM400 Classic 2 Speed Juicer have a juice pitcher that is less than 1 liter while the pulp container is less than 1.5 liters. Some juicers offer much larger containers such as the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor and Cuisinart CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor.

While all juicers require scrubbing, we wanted to find the models that were as simple to clean as possible, free of nooks and crannies where pulp could collect. Despite a reputation that cold-press models will have you digging pulp out of their components for hours, our testing found that they were only slightly more difficult to clean than the centrifugal juicers.

The Slowstar has a proprietary “Duoblade” auger, which has two cutting edges to chop and crush more with each rotation than single edges can. The motor uses a three-gear system that allows it to turn slowly but with plenty of torque; in our testing, we found that this translates to low-temperature juice with maximum yields from even low-moisture greens like kale.
With this in mind, you can better understand what types of pulp ejection systems might best suit your needs. Many juicers, such as the Omega J8006 Masticating Juicer have pulp ejection systems that remove pulp as you are juicing. These types of systems are great if you are looking to make enough juice for several days, or several people. The Omega J8006 ejects pulp from the front, which should be placed over some sort of container device to collect the pulp. If you were, for example, be juicing on the edge of your counter and have the pulp ejecting into your trash can, you’d likely run out of fruit long before you ran out of room to hold your pulp. Other models such as the Breville 800JEXL come with specially-designed pulp collection bins. This is great for ease-of-use but poses a limited amount of space.
The proportion of pulp to juice varies from fruit to fruit. Juicing avocados or bananas produces a puree rather than a juice. Form leafy vegetables into compact balls or rolls before inserting into food chute. All fruits with pits and large seeds, such as nectarines, peaches, apricots, plums and cherries must be pitted before juicing. Also, it is recommended that oranges, pineapples, melons and mangoes be peeled before placing in the unit to minimize impact on juice flavor. When juicing carrots, do not pack the food chute or allow pulp container to overfill, since this may prevent correct operation or damage to the unit. Place carrots in food chute one by one, and press down gently with food pusher to extract the maximum amount of juice every time. Be prepared to rinse individual parts after each use.
Our top choice, the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, does a fine job extracting juice from tougher vegetables and fruits, leaving behind only a small amount of pulp. It struggled a bit with softer produce like lettuce and fresh herbs but still performed well. This is also one of the few juicers we tested that managed to make almond milk using water-soaked almonds and water.
Centrifugal juicers grind up produce with tiny teeth on a rapidly spinning basket. The juice is then forced through a fine mesh sieve. This method works quickly but tends to produce a lot of foam which some find unappealing or feel causes oxidization of their juice. Centrifugal juicers work best for juicing carrots, apples, and other hard fruits and vegetables versus high fiber leafy greens like wheatgrass and kale. They’re light, easy to set up and use, and easy to clean with removable dishwasher safe parts. These juicers are speedy but tend to be loud (which could be an issue if you’re juicing early in the morning while people are sleeping).  They’re affordable and great for those just getting into juicing with quality models starting at $50. 
Lemons and oranges should be peeled unless one wants to consume all those antifungal sprays that are sprayed on many citrus prior to storage. Even DIY home grown organic peel with no chemicals will spoil the taste just because citrus oil in peels is too strong for consumption in quantities – this is why some supermarket citrus juices have this wonderful smell combined with some bitter aftertaste. Citrus oil is good to flavour cakes and treat pimples, but not for drinking.
There are lots of brands available, but Joe Cross used a Breville juicer throughout Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead. He still uses and endorses them to this day. Note that in the UK and Europe, Breville markets its products under different brands (e.g. Sage, Riviera & Bar, Gastroback). The links below will direct you to the equivalent model. We recommend three Breville centrifugal juicers.

If a significant portion of your calories are going to come from juice each day, mix up your produce. Go with veggie-heavy juices, using just a bit of fruit for sweetness. Alternate types of produce, and try something entirely new periodically. Farmers markets and ethnic grocery stores are great spots to find fruits and vegetables you’ve never tasted before.
Our top choice, the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, does a fine job extracting juice from tougher vegetables and fruits, leaving behind only a small amount of pulp. It struggled a bit with softer produce like lettuce and fresh herbs but still performed well. This is also one of the few juicers we tested that managed to make almond milk using water-soaked almonds and water.
Also, we realize that $300-plus is a lot to spend on a small appliance, but we’ve found that paying a bit more for your machine up front is worth doing. Juicing is a costly habit no matter how you do it. Although the initial investment on our pick is high, you won’t be throwing money out with partially extracted, soggy pulp. You can also check eBay and Craigslist for used juicers, especially Omegas and Huroms, because they’ve been around a while. A lot of people sell their machines after realizing they’re not ready to give up the money, counter space, or time required to make juice regularly. You won’t be able to take advantage of the warranty, but you can get really good deals (and even resell yours if you get tired of it).
Below you’ll find a short list and description of some of the juicers that we’ve found to be of the highest quality. Breville has dominated much of our consideration for the best juicers—as they did for the best espresso machines as well! They are a tremendous company that has received an absurd amount of positive feedback from customers. Nevertheless, there are several other very noteworthy juicer brands on the market such as Omega that offer strong contention for the title of ‘best juicer’. Our final list consideration has tried to account for the best product in several different price ranges, not just the most affordable or most expensive.
The Omega VSJ843 is a great option for green-juice fans. Juice from this machine is virtually pulp-free and full of flavor with minimal foam, and the yield for green juice was especially high. The machine itself has a lower profile than the Tribest and runs at a quiet hum. Plus, cleaning the VSJ843 model’s parts is easier than cleaning those of other juicers. Omega’s 15-year warranty guarantees this machine will earn its keep over time. It isn’t as all-purpose as our top pick, however, with lower yields on carrot-apple juice and no nut-butter attachments. Plus it costs more.
Part of a Healthy Lifestyle* According to the USDA, "The benefits of eating fruits and vegetables daily are undeniable. People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet, are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases, including heart attack and stroke, certain cancers, heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. It's also been proven to reduce the risk of developing kidney stone, decrease bone loss, ease muscle aches, alleviate high blood pressure and add years to your life." * Source: USDA, 2012 "Healthy Eating on a Budget." www.choosemyplate.gov
Sturdy, function-based, and thoroughly designed in the smallest details to excel at what it does, the Breville 800CPXL is the best citrus juicer on the market for the quality. Probably not worth it if you’re an individual who only enjoys a glass of tangy drink or two a week, but if you’re a professional kitchen, a small juice bar, or a family with more than 2 orange juice fans, the juicer will be one of the best investments you can make.
There are several other juicers in the market that warrant a look at. Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to review them. You might want to check them out: Super Angel Pro Stainless Steel Juicer, Tribest Greenstar Elite GSE-5050 Jumbo Twin Gear Cold Press Juice Extractor, Green Power KPE1304 Twin Gear Juicer, VonShef Professional Powerful Wide Mouth Whole Fruit Juicer Machine 700W, and BLACK+DECKER JE2200B Fruit & Vegetable Juicer.
How much are you really willing to spend? If you’re just planning on trying this healthy habit out first, then we recommend that you pick the most affordable ones on our list such as Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor, Juiceman JM400 Classic 2 Speed Juicer, and Hamilton Beach 67650A Big Mouth Pro Juice Extractor. If you’re a serious juicer with serious money to spend, we recommend you go with the Omega J8006 Nutrition Center masticating Dual-stage Juicer Juice Extractor.
The juicer also has a big enough mouth for larger pieces of fruit, and in many cases, you'll be able to fit an entire fruit or vegetable in there without having to cut it up at all. That cuts down on prep time and ensures you won't have to dirty up knives and cutting boards to make some juice. The motor inside the juicer is 850-watt, and the device comes with a liter jug, a froth separator, and a cleaning brush.
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