Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
The commercial-grade Omega J8004 juicer does best with hard fruits and vegetables, and was more efficient than popular (and still great) juicers like the Breville Juice Fountain Plus we tested. It’s great for people on a budget with limited counter space. And with a 15-year warranty, the machine is built to last. In our tests, the J8004 extracted a fair amount of both green juice and carrot-apple juice, falling in the middle of the pack for both tests.
It's entirely possible that you're curious about buying a juicer. In case you haven't heard, juicing is trending. We're not talking about the Barry Bonds type of juicing, but the Jack LaLanne type. Recent claims have promised that drinking fresh-pressed juices can help you lose weight, boost immunity, prevent cancer and cleanse your system. Whether that's entirely true remains to be seen, but it can't hurt, right?

Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.
The juicer also has a big enough mouth for larger pieces of fruit, and in many cases, you'll be able to fit an entire fruit or vegetable in there without having to cut it up at all. That cuts down on prep time and ensures you won't have to dirty up knives and cutting boards to make some juice. The motor inside the juicer is 850-watt, and the device comes with a liter jug, a froth separator, and a cleaning brush.
The gist: To add another Breville model to the list, we've got the 800JEXL. Though it comes with a heftier price tag than the JE98XL, the 800JEXL is called "elite" for a reason. Breville endearingly refers to this model as the "Rolls Royce" of juicers, with its powerful 1000-watt motor and heavy grade die-cast metal body.  Like the JE98XL, it has a dual high/low-speed switch so you can switch depending on if you're juicing hard or soft produce. This model's "fast" speed setting beats the JE98XL at 13,000rpm, so the process is a bit quicker. In terms of overall quality, the 800JEXL is definitely top notch and great for any serious juicer looking to make a worthy investment.
Juicing allows for a tremendous amount of nutrients and enzymes to be made available to your body, which allows for a fuller more robust overall state of health. The micronutrients released during juicing are often left unused when simply eaten, being locked tightly away in the cell walls of fruits and veggies. While your digestive system can unlock some of these nutrients, many simply go to waste without first being juiced. Juicing is a great way to lose weight safely, since that you are still getting proper nutrition while still lowering overall caloric intake. With all this in mind, it’s no surprise that the popularity of juicing, and juicers, has skyrocketed in recent years. Hopefully, after reading this buyer’s guide, you’ll not only be more aware of the benefits of juicing but also in your ability to pick out the best juicer for you!

Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
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If you are a newbie at juicing, you may be hesitant to spend on the pricier model. However, it’s not only the price of the juicer that you should consider but the cost of the whole juicing process over time. To illustrate, the cheaper centrifugal juicers are not as efficient as the masticating or triturating ones such that there are lower juice yield and much wastage of produce.

We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
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