Feeder tubes are the parts of juicers where the food is inserted. The larger your feeder tube, the more fruits, and vegetables you’ll be able to cram in at once. Some less-expensive juicers have tops that come off completely, similar to blenders. Juicers with feeder tubes also offer the advantage of being able to press the fruits and veggies into the juicer, helping to chop and grind them up.
Juicing is largely considered to be a great habit to start if you want to improve your health and form better eating and drinking habits. A fresh juice with a good combination of fruits and vegetables can be a great way to get more vitamins, antioxidants, enzymes, and minerals — many of which don't come through when the fruits and vegetables are processed in other cooking methods.

Everyone from Wall Street bankers to Beyoncé is talking about juice cleanses, but registered dietitian Emily Braaten urged us to be wary: “There is no substantial scientific evidence to support the use of freshly squeezed juice for ‘cleansing’ purposes. Humans rely on the liver and the kidneys to separate out potentially toxic byproducts of metabolism.” The National Institutes of Health (NIH) point out that each of your kidneys “is made up of about a million filtering units” that remove about one to two quarts of waste and extra fluid a day via your urine. In other words, your body already has the whole detox thing covered.


Low foam production: The foam that accumulates on top of your juice is a good indicator of how much air has been whipped into your juice by the machine, and more air exposure equals more oxidation. Oxidation is a controversial topic. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, “Because juicing mixes together the contents of living cells, including active enzymes and various reactive and oxygen-sensitive substances, fresh juices are unstable and change rapidly.” So the prevailing theory among juicers is that if less oxygen is whipped into a juice, the valuable nutrients and enzymes remain more intact. But as Kohler told us, there’s not much peer-reviewed research on how or if oxidation affects the nutrient contents of your juice. “It’s all manufacturers’ data for the most part,” he said, “which I take with a grain of salt.” That said, we still prioritized machines that produced less foam, because at the very least, oxidation can cause your green juice to turn brown, and may lead to some muddy, off flavors.
All things considered, shopping for a juicer is like balancing needs, features, and budget. If you are looking to buy a high-quality juicer that will likely meet any demand you have for it (within reason), you can expect to pay anywhere from $150 to $400. The difference in price for the higher-quality juicers are typically found in capacity and overall power. Less expensive, high-quality juicers will often be labeled as ‘compact’. Below you’ll find a listing of many of the most popular juicers on the market today, all of which have received thousands of 5-star reviews online. Yes, thousands. These products have been put to the test by juicers all around the world, and are regarded by nutrition specialists as being the best at providing nutritionally-dense juicers at home. All of these products are available for purchase through Amazon, most have free shipping, and they are all backed by a manufacturer’s warranty.
The Hamilton Beach 67650A Juice Extractor comes with a useful 20-ounce container/pitcher, but the tall design also means that there's plenty of room for your own receptacle under the spout. Although Hamilton Beach doesn't give an actual size for the pulp bin, it is more than adequate. As is common with modern juicers, the removable parts are dishwasher safe.
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
KitchenAid makes a juicing attachment for the Artisan stand mixer, the Masticating Juicer Attachment, as well as the standalone Maximum Extraction Juicer. In our research, we found that the Maximum Extraction Juicer didn’t compare to our picks in yields, extraction, build quality, or warranty (one-year limited). We don’t think it’s worth testing because it has too many shortcomings for its high price. The juicing attachment for the Artisan mixer is cheaper than a full juicer, but it gets poor reviews on Amazon for being hard to use and clean, and it seems to have difficulty with hard roots and vegetables.
"I absolutely love this juicer, it is so fast to juice and simple clean up too. I line the pulp container with a plastic produce bag and put my glass directly under the spout so I have two less parts to clean. Using this system, I only have three parts to clean, all are easy to clean and dry. I have very little time in the morning, I can barely make it to work on time, but since clean up is so quick, I have made a juice every morning since I received this juicer. I was impressed at the speed of this juicer and with very little noise. (I get a lot of juice too!) I also like that this juicer does not take up a lot of counter space, it's fairly compact compared to others I have researched. AND the price is extremely reasonable! A friend of mine came over while I was juicing and she was so impressed with this model that she asked me for the ordering information! In the past, she has had 3 different juicers and she said none of them compared to this one! Honestly, I can't think of anything about this juicer that I would change...maybe it would be helpful if they included a juicing recipe book! Thank you Amazon for the quality product and the fast shipping!"
The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
There are lots of brands available, but Joe Cross used a Breville juicer throughout Fat, Sick & Nearly Dead. He still uses and endorses them to this day. Note that in the UK and Europe, Breville markets its products under different brands (e.g. Sage, Riviera & Bar, Gastroback). The links below will direct you to the equivalent model. We recommend three Breville centrifugal juicers.
This type of buildup can become a sanitation issue, and also eventually lead to a poor functioning juicer. The best juicers on the market are those that also feature intuitive means of disassembly for cleaning, and provide as much accommodation for use with dishwashers as possible. You should be able to easily get to the core parts of your juicer, such as the Auger, the filter screens, the pulp ejection bin, and the juice containers. This accessibility will allow you to easily and effectively clean your juicer, which will help reduce chances of molds and other unsanitary build ups.

This machine has a very pleasant look to it and offers a more sophisticated spout than most of the electric juicers we considered. You can adjust it for the speed of juice flow. You remove the lid by pressing your thumb down on a spring-loaded button. This design is different from any of the other juicers and gives it a sophisticated look. The juicer lid is the only one that operates on a hinge. We like this feature as it allows you to keep the lid open, hands-free, when cleaning or leave it open to air-dry after washing.
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
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