Also, we realize that $300-plus is a lot to spend on a small appliance, but we’ve found that paying a bit more for your machine up front is worth doing. Juicing is a costly habit no matter how you do it. Although the initial investment on our pick is high, you won’t be throwing money out with partially extracted, soggy pulp. You can also check eBay and Craigslist for used juicers, especially Omegas and Huroms, because they’ve been around a while. A lot of people sell their machines after realizing they’re not ready to give up the money, counter space, or time required to make juice regularly. You won’t be able to take advantage of the warranty, but you can get really good deals (and even resell yours if you get tired of it).
Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.
Warranty: No matter what kind of juicer you're getting, you want it to last. You should always get small appliances with some level of warranty, but normally the longer the warranty, the better. Not only does it show that a company is confident in its product, but it also means that if something does break, you won't have to shell out any extra cash.
"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."

Born and raised in Paris, the land of unapologetic butter, Francois has spent the last 20 years shaping the American culinary world behind the scenes. He was a buyer at Williams-Sonoma, built the Food Network online store, managed product assortments for Rachael Ray's site, started two meal delivery businesses and runs a successful baking blog. When he's not baking a cake or eating his way through Europe, Francois enjoys sharing cooking skills with cooks of all levels. Rules he lives by: "Use real butter" and "Nothing beats a sharp knife."

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Even though many people laud fresh green juice as an excellent way to get a boost of vitamins and nutrients, juice isn’t a magical potion. As doctors at the Mayo Clinic point out: “Juicing probably is not any healthier than eating whole fruits and vegetables … whole fruits and vegetables also have healthy fiber, which is lost during most juicing.” However, it does go on to say: “The resulting liquid contains most of the vitamins, minerals and plant chemicals (phytonutrients) found in the whole fruit.”

Not only thick and firm produce like apples or carrots, or more fibrous leaves like kale, cabbage, or celery, the NC900HDC would take even the thinnest of leaves like spinach or dandelion. Its strong squeeze takes every single drop of nutritious liquid out of your veggies, leaving only fiber to the pulp. This is the reason why it also takes the first position in our list of the best juicers for leafy veggies.
You should expect your juicer to have ample capabilities in storing the juice that it produces from your fruits and vegetables. Many juicers feature built-in juice collection containers, while others simply utilize an outlet which allows any container of your choosing to be used. You should consider your personal preference when considering this feature, and try to imagine how you may be using your juicer the most. If, for instance, you plan on making many servings of juice at once, you’d likely want to find a model that allowed for the easy use of custom containers. If you plan on juicing only a few servings at a time, maybe just enough for a day, you’d likely be best served by looking for juicers with built-in juicing storage containers.
The gist: If you immediately think "Jamba Juice" when you see this juicer, good call. It's the brainchild of the widely-known juice chain. Since Jamba Juice knows a thing or two about juicing, they made sure to give this baby a *super* wide chute— three and a half inches wide, to be exact, which is the largest available of any juicer. This basically eliminates the need for pre-cutting. It comes with an impressive 1100-watt motor and two speed settings, so you can adjust speed depending on what you're juicing in order to maximize juice output. The Jamba Juicer comes with a few little extra goodies, like a clean sweep cleaning brush and a recipe book filled with juice and pulp recipes. 
"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."
We tested the Omega juicer in our kitchen to see how it fared against all sorts of vegetables and fruits, including everything from carrots and beets to apples and pineapple. No matter what we fed into the juicer, it produced a ton of juice with very little effort. The pulp collected quickly in one bin, while juice mounted up in the other. This juicer is very easy to use, even for a novice.
The Omega VRT400HDS is a masticating juicer—preferred by many for releasing more enzyme rich juices—but makes use of a vertical design to allow a more streamlined juicing experience. This vertical design allows for more efficient pressure to be applied, as well as being a more compact design. This juicer is great if you’re serious about juicing, and have a diet that requires high-volumes of fresh-squeezed juice.
Juicing allows for a tremendous amount of nutrients and enzymes to be made available to your body, which allows for a fuller more robust overall state of health. The micronutrients released during juicing are often left unused when simply eaten, being locked tightly away in the cell walls of fruits and veggies. While your digestive system can unlock some of these nutrients, many simply go to waste without first being juiced. Juicing is a great way to lose weight safely, since that you are still getting proper nutrition while still lowering overall caloric intake. With all this in mind, it’s no surprise that the popularity of juicing, and juicers, has skyrocketed in recent years. Hopefully, after reading this buyer’s guide, you’ll not only be more aware of the benefits of juicing but also in your ability to pick out the best juicer for you!
Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.
Place a 14-oz. (414-ml) or larger cup or travel mug underneath to catch vinegar. Select 14oz travel mug . Press BREW REG or BREW BOLD button once. When solution starts dispensing, press BREW REG or BREW BOLD button again to stop brewing and allow vinegar to clean. After 30 minutes, press BREW REG or BREW BOLD button and allow it to finish brew cycle. When brew cycle is finished, empty cup and rinse.

We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.
The gist: For those looking to get the most out of their leafy greens, the Lexen GP27 is the way to *manually* do just that. This juicer is the solution for those that don't want to lay out hundreds for an expensive masticating juicer, but also don't want to settle for a cheap, crummy manual model. As the folks at The Healthy Juicer say, this thing was designed to be "simple, mobile, versatile, and easy to clean." Simple is right. To use, just put a put a juice cup under the spout, place your greens into the chute, and start churning.  Cleaning this thing is a breeze, since all you have to do is unscrew the parts, rinse them off in the sink, and boom—you're done. Thanks to its high juice-yield and cold-press technology, you can rest assured your greens will be nutrient-packed to the max. 
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