Making cocktails at home doesn’t have to be complicated, but we can all aspire to more than dumping margarita mix in a blender. Over the past two years, we’ve spent 70 hours researching bar tools, speaking with some of the top bartenders in the country and testing five dozen models to bring you this guide to the absolute best items for home mixology.

Sturdy, function-based, and thoroughly designed in the smallest details to excel at what it does, the Breville 800CPXL is the best citrus juicer on the market for the quality. Probably not worth it if you’re an individual who only enjoys a glass of tangy drink or two a week, but if you’re a professional kitchen, a small juice bar, or a family with more than 2 orange juice fans, the juicer will be one of the best investments you can make.


When your fruits or vegetables are put into a centrifugal juicer, they are grated into smaller slices and pieces through sharp teeth-like blades. These blades are usually found on the bottom of a basket-like part, such as the Nutridisk of the Breville 800JEXL, and less efficient than the augers found on masticating juicers. Juice is extracted during this process by through the pressure of centrifugal force as the ground-up parts of the fruits and vegetables are pressed against walls of a filter. The faster these juicers spin, the greater the amount of force applied during this process, and the great the amount of juice that is extracted. A typical Centrifugal juicer will have a motor with 800 watts of power or more spin at nearly 15,000 RPM and are regarded as being very noisy. The juices produced by these juicers have shorter shelf lives due to increased aeration associated with centrifugal separation processes.
Feeder tubes are the parts of juicers where the food is inserted. The larger your feeder tube, the more fruits, and vegetables you’ll be able to cram in at once. Some less-expensive juicers have tops that come off completely, similar to blenders. Juicers with feeder tubes also offer the advantage of being able to press the fruits and veggies into the juicer, helping to chop and grind them up.
Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.
The Hurom comes with a lidded pitcher for collecting juice, but its slow-turning auger produced so little splatter that we also had no problem putting our own glass directly under the juice spout. Clean juicing makes for means you’re not beholden to the Hurom’s pitcher, making it easier to juice straight into your to-go cup and reducing counter clean-up. (When we tried this with the Juiceman, we ended up with a foot-wide splatter radius.)
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