Like all Hamilton Beach products, our juicers offer reliable efficiency and durability. We offer models with powerful motors that are able to extract juice from a range of fruits and vegetables. Big Mouth® Juice Extractors have the added benefit of large chutes that let you process whole vegetables and fruits reducing your prep time because you don’t have to precut your produce. And with all our juicer machines, cleaning up is a snap — most parts are dishwasher safe. 
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
With all of the above info in mind, you’ll be able to consider juicers, their features, and any specialized purpose they may offer with a fresh new perspective. Taking into account what features you feel will best serve your needs, you’ll be able to sift through the marketing jargon and really compare function. Many people new to juicing are often taken back by the prices of most of the juicers with good reviews. A typical juicer can vary tremendously depending on the quality of parts, the type of functionality, and any specialized features. High-RPM motors found in centrifugal juicers tend to raise cost more than the motors found in slow juicers such as masticating juicers. However, the Auger of masticating juicers often costs more than the filter and teeth used to grind up produce in the centrifugal models.
For its smart design and features, as well as the brand moniker, the Breville 800CPXL is no doubt a desirable item to have on the countertop in an orange juice loving family’s kitchen, or in a small juice bar. It actually makes sense to have one along with a centrifuge or masticator, because when you only need citrus juice, cleanup is so much easier on the 800CPXL.
Cuisinart’s CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor is one of our top picks because it offers quite a lot of bang for your buck. For less than $150, you get a 3-inch feed chute, a BPA-free machine, a 2-liter pulp container, a safety locking mechanism, an anti-drip flow spout, a 1-liter juice pitcher, die-cast stainless steel housing, a 1000-watt motor, 5-speed control with LED lights, and wait for it… a 3-year warranty. Now, what other juicer offers all that?
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Masticating juicers use an Auger, which is very similar in appearance to a drill-bit. Mos feature some sort of cork-screw type design that chops up food while pressing it forward at the same time. This is a very efficient means of applying force and therefore requires the less powerful motor. Typically, a masticating juicer’s auger is made of a high-density plastic like the GE Ultem found on the Breville 800JEXL. the use of these durable materials is favorable, considering the auger is the part doing all the work.
The Omega VSJ843 is one of the slowest and quietest machines we’ve tested, and it produces juices without much foam. The VSJ843 produced almost as much green juice as our top pick, the high-yielding Tribest. So if you’re a devoted green juicer, you might prefer this Omega to our pick. However, for most people, its higher price, slightly lower yields on carrot-apple juice, and lack of versatility make it a second choice to our top pick.

We used three recipes to test how well each juicer handled hard produce (apples, carrots, etc.), soft produce (salad greens, fresh herbs, etc.) and almonds. In our test kitchen, we measured the results precisely, noted the amount of juice and pulp that emerged, and scored each juicer on performance. We also measured the noise in decibels, monitored spills or splatters, timed assembly and cleanup efforts, and noted such specifications as juicer dimensions and electrical cord length.

Masticating juicers rely on direct mechanical force to chop and squeeze juice from fruits and vegetables. This method typically involves less power and lower temperatures and is regarded as the best juicing method by many. Masticating juicers are able to use less-powerful motors than other types of juicers because of the way they are designed. Less powerful motors mean less heat being put off. Many people believe that this reduction in heat helps to preserve the natural enzymes found in juice.
To open a can, push front of cutting assembly backwards to lift the blade. Make sure the flip-up magnet is in the up position. Tilt top of can in to position cutting blade inside rim of can. Push down top of cutting assembly to start the cutting action. To remove the can, hold the can and push backwards on front of cutting assembly again. To remove the cutting assembly for washing, twist release button on front of can opener clockwise and lift out cutting assembly. Wash, rinse, and dry thoroughly. If you want to wash the cutting assembly in the dishwasher, remove flip-up magnet first by grasping one side near hinge and pulling out slightly until magnet releases from hinge. To replace cutting assembly, place it in position and firmly press both sides until it snaps into place.
Some compact juicers collect the pulp in an internal basket, but most others eject the pulp outside of the machine into a container that is specifically sized for the juicer. We recommend purchasing a juice extractor that ejects the pulp externally– this allows you to make larger quantities of juice without having to take extra time to stop your juicer, open it up, and empty the basket. Once you get juicing, you don’t want to have to stop before you’re finished.
There are other features which give you convenience. A juicer that has a large feeding tube, for instance, means you can put in large chunks, enabling you to skip the tedious chore of chopping your produce into small pieces. A large disposal spout is also a good feature as large spouts do not easily get clogged up and have the added advantage of producing a higher volume of juice.
We tested the Omega juicer in our kitchen to see how it fared against all sorts of vegetables and fruits, including everything from carrots and beets to apples and pineapple. No matter what we fed into the juicer, it produced a ton of juice with very little effort. The pulp collected quickly in one bin, while juice mounted up in the other. This juicer is very easy to use, even for a novice.
Considering the 15-year warranty on the Omega J8004 model’s motor and parts, we think this is the best value juicer you can get compared with cheaper models with shorter warranties. Although its price is more palatable than the Tribest’s, there are some trade-offs. First, the J8004 is quite big, requiring a 16-by-7-inch space on the counter. It also isn’t great with softer, juicy fruits, which get gummy and block the juicer; you’ll need to alternate adding different types of produce when juicing with this machine to keep it running. And, as we mentioned earlier, its feed tube is an inch narrower than the Tribest’s, which makes a difference in how much prep work you need to do with vegetables. Because the J8004 is a budget machine, you’ll save about $150 up front, but you may lose some of those savings in juice left behind in the pulp you toss when juicing things like kale. Compared with the rest of the competition, however, we still think the J8004 extracts more juice from produce.
Juicers are expensive machines that take up a lot of space on a counter, but they’re a great investment for juice enthusiasts. With a juicer, you can offset the cost of boutique juice by making it at home—if you drink green juice five times a week, the savings can add up to hundreds of dollars over the course of a year. Because vegetables are pricey in the quantities needed for juicing, an efficient extractor will make more juice for your money. If the yield on your current juicer isn’t very high, or you have a model geared more toward soft fruit rather than tough greens, we recommend upgrading.
Traditionally, this is the most common type of juicer. These typically utilize a fast-spinning metal blade that spins against a mesh filter, separating juice from flesh via centrifugal force. The juice and pulp are then separated into different containers. The problem with centrifugal juicers is that the fast-spinning metal blade generates heat, which destroys some of the enzymes in the fruits and vegetables you're juicing. The heat also oxidizes those nutrients, rendering less nutritious juice than a cold-press juicer.
Sifting through the endless numbers of juicers can be tough, and without a concise frame of reference, you’ll likely drift aimlessly. This guide is meant to serve as a clearly-outlined reference for those looking to compare the best juicers on the market. Make no mistake, these juicers aren’t the cheapest juicers available, but they are without doubt among the best. For those already familiar with the types of juicers, the benefits of juicing, and all the other information that will be covered in this article, you can find a quick reference table below:
"This is an easy to use, easy to clean citrus juicer that I wish I had bought 25 years ago! It is versatile (will juice small fruit like limes or large fruit such as Meyer lemons and even relatively small grapefruit. There is an adjustment allowing a little or a large amount of pulp to go through with the juice. It is well made and requires only a small space for storage. I will be buying oranges by the bag to have fresh juice. Probably my favorite small appliance."

The best juicers extract as much liquid as possible from fruits and vegetables, leaving behind very little pulp. Machines that leave large amounts of very moist pulp just aren’t doing their job. The same is true for froth. Every juicer makes some froth, but you don't want inches of bubbles – you want a machine that gives you the most juice for your money.

Are you looking for a quick daily juice to take on your commute or something packed with all kinds of unusual ingredients to enjoy on a luxurious weekend morning? To make the most out of your juicer, get a head start by researching recipes involving your favorite ingredients. There are lots of online guides for beginners. The last thing you want to do is purchase a juicer and have it gather dust because you got sick of straight carrot juice.
The juicer's side has an indent that molds perfectly to the shape of the pitcher so you always know where to place it. The pitcher lid has an opening at the top that allows juice to drain from the juicer's nozzle directly into the pitcher. There is also a nifty piece of plastic that prevents any froth from making its way from the pitcher to your cup. In our testing, we found that this separator worked well to keep our juice froth-free so you could enjoy it right away. If you prefer froth in your juice, you can remove the separator.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
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These are also called cold-press or auger-style juicers. These devices have an auger that grinds the produce, breaking down cell walls and releasing the juice, which is then squeezed through a steel screen. Masticating juicers take longer than extractors to produce your cup of juice, but yield more juice and leave more of the nutrients intact. If you like green juices with plenty of leafy, tough greens like kale, you’ll be happiest with this type of juicer. Many can also be used to make nut milk. You’ll pay quite a bit more for a cold-press juicer, however.
Part of a Healthy Lifestyle* According to the USDA, "The benefits of eating fruits and vegetables daily are undeniable. People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet, are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases, including heart attack and stroke, certain cancers, heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. It's also been proven to reduce the risk of developing kidney stone, decrease bone loss, ease muscle aches, alleviate high blood pressure and add years to your life." * Source: USDA, 2012 "Healthy Eating on a Budget." www.choosemyplate.gov
Of course, it's important to note that this is an entry-level model, so it is lacking in some features. For example, it only has two settings - "on" and "off " — so it'll either juice what you put in there, or it won't. It's also a little loud, and according to some reviews, can get messy. In general, this is best for those just getting into juicing and who don't necessarily know if it'll be a long-term investment for them.

These are also manual citrus juicers. They have an arm on left/right side that you have to pull down to force the juice out of the fruit. The mechanism is quite simple. You put a half-cut fruit on the bottom squeezing part and then use the handle to pull down the top squeezing part onto that forcefully to press the juice out. The arms are mostly made out of metal and on some low-cost models they can break with undue force. They are also known as citrus presses because there is no reaming action involved in it.


Everyone from Wall Street bankers to Beyoncé is talking about juice cleanses, but registered dietitian Emily Braaten urged us to be wary: “There is no substantial scientific evidence to support the use of freshly squeezed juice for ‘cleansing’ purposes. Humans rely on the liver and the kidneys to separate out potentially toxic byproducts of metabolism.” The National Institutes of Health (NIH) point out that each of your kidneys “is made up of about a million filtering units” that remove about one to two quarts of waste and extra fluid a day via your urine. In other words, your body already has the whole detox thing covered.
Cuisinart is one of the most well-known kitchen appliance companies, with products like coffee makers, outdoor grills and many others. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 holds up to the company's standards by providing everything you need to commit to a cup of fresh juice every day or for a full-on juice fast. Its extra-large 3-inch chute means you can drop in whole apples, pears and oranges without having to remove seeds, which saves time. All of the Cuisinart Juice Extractor's impressive features have earned it our Top Ten Reviews Gold Award.

For your absolute peace of mind, you can go for the more expensive brands and models which guarantee lifetime warranty. If you are a newbie at juicing, however, and are not sure if you could stick with juicing for life, it may be wise to go for cheaper brands which offer limited warranties. You may also look for cheaper brands which do offer lifetime warranties for certain parts.


If you are a newbie at juicing, you may be hesitant to spend on the pricier model. However, it’s not only the price of the juicer that you should consider but the cost of the whole juicing process over time. To illustrate, the cheaper centrifugal juicers are not as efficient as the masticating or triturating ones such that there are lower juice yield and much wastage of produce.

Reasonable footprint: Juicers can be rather in-your-face appliances, depending on size and noise level. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space. The oval bases hover around 7 to 8 inches in diameter. You can tuck a vertical juicer into a corner quite easily, though they are generally tall (about 16 to 18 inches) and require cabinet clearance. Because horizontal juicers can hog a lot of space, we preferred vertical juicers.

Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier.
Traditionally, this is the most common type of juicer. These typically utilize a fast-spinning metal blade that spins against a mesh filter, separating juice from flesh via centrifugal force. The juice and pulp are then separated into different containers. The problem with centrifugal juicers is that the fast-spinning metal blade generates heat, which destroys some of the enzymes in the fruits and vegetables you're juicing. The heat also oxidizes those nutrients, rendering less nutritious juice than a cold-press juicer.
There are several other juicers in the market that warrant a look at. Unfortunately, we didn’t have time to review them. You might want to check them out: Super Angel Pro Stainless Steel Juicer, Tribest Greenstar Elite GSE-5050 Jumbo Twin Gear Cold Press Juice Extractor, Green Power KPE1304 Twin Gear Juicer, VonShef Professional Powerful Wide Mouth Whole Fruit Juicer Machine 700W, and BLACK+DECKER JE2200B Fruit & Vegetable Juicer.
Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control
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