Shopping for a juicer can be a daunting task, as there are quite a few juicers out there to choose from. Stores such as Macy’s, Target, Wal-Mart, and even Bed Bath & Beyond offer ‘affordable’ type juicers that are meant more as a means of meeting a demand for juicers than in meeting the demands of juicers. Simply put, if you’re buying a juicer in a store, unless you’ve done your research, you’re likely getting a sub-par product. Certainly, there are exceptions to the rules, and many retailers have realized consumers are beginning to care as much about quality as price again. To get a better idea of what type of juicer may be best-suited for your needs, you’ll find a brief overview of the different juicer types below.
Single-auger juicers: An auger is like a big, threaded screw that pulls fruit or vegetables into the juicing chamber and presses the juice out. The auger can turn anywhere from 43 to 80 rpm, resulting in slowly produced, low-foam, low-temperature, high-volume, and nutrient-dense juice. Single-auger juicers can be oriented vertically or horizontally and are very versatile, good for greens and hard roots. Although vertical and horizontal juicers work on the same principle, vertical juicers have a smaller footprint and slightly larger yield. But vertical models are generally in the $300 to $400 range, so they’re not for the occasional juice drinker. They’re best suited for those who include fresh green juice as part of a daily routine and are concerned about low oxidation and maximum yield. And certain models, like our pick, have food-mincing and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making capabilities. All of our picks are single-auger juicers: the Tribest Slowstar and Omega VSJ843 are examples of vertical single-auger juicers, and the Omega J8004 is a horizontal single-auger juicer.
It is very good unit for juicing carrots, apples and similar harder veggies. We used it today (03/15/2016) for large amount of carrot juice (over one gallon, with breaks every liter and to empty pulp container) and it came out with minimum foam, good consistency and reasonably dry pulp. Position of the chute is good, no leaks, no splatter, no mess, regardless it is 1000 watts on highest speed. Unit’s cutting basket has very minimal vibrations which disappear more of less at normal speed and there is floating mechanism added to electric motor that works out the vibrations quite nicely. Well, after all it is a centrifugal juicer not a satellite guiding system, therefore little thing like this is expected and not bothersome. Locking mechanism on this juicer is very well designed, and base is actually made from magnesium like casting, which makes it bottom heavy and quite sturdy. The opening on top is large, so I would be very careful and never leave this unit unattended if one has little child of the kind that can get into trouble in split second.. Granted this is not a grinder, but I feel compelled to mention this - we all should know that little kids, active cell phones, laud TV’s and tired parents when all on can become potentially harmful combination.
If you’re also into making homemade nut butter, you might want to go for the best masticating juicer you can find because besides giving you your freshly squeezed juice for the day, you also have a chance to make some preservative-free peanut butter for your PB&J. Thinking about juicers masticating your favorite fruits and vegetables may not be pretty, but it may well be worth it if you’re getting more than juice for your juicer machine.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
If juicing leafy greens is an emphasis for you or you want a machine that handles other kitchen prep the Omega J8006 is your best choice. This classic cold press masticating juicer has been a best seller for years and produced the highest volume of kale juice of all the juicers we tested. It works quietly at slow speeds (only 80 RPM) to extract juice from all kinds of produce. Its dual-stage juicing system mimics how humans chew–the crush and press process produces drier pulp and high juice yield. We did have to spend more time cutting fruits and vegetables up to fit them into the small feed tube and occasionally had to stop juicing and use the “reverse” feature to handle clogs. It also produced slightly less juice from hard fruits and vegetables and as a horizontal model has a bigger countertop footprint. However, it offers additional functions such as pureeing nuts into nut butters, grinding spices and coffee, making pasta, and baby food with an extremely generous 15 year warranty.

We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
If a significant portion of your calories are going to come from juice each day, mix up your produce. Go with veggie-heavy juices, using just a bit of fruit for sweetness. Alternate types of produce, and try something entirely new periodically. Farmers markets and ethnic grocery stores are great spots to find fruits and vegetables you’ve never tasted before.
Features: From the smallest lime to the largest grapefruit, this sleek brushed stainless steel citrus juicer gets out more juice more efficiently. An adjustable auto-reversing reamer features “custom” pulp control settings, and the unique Final-Spin feature maximizes the amount of juice from each piece of fruit. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a breeze. Features: Adjustable reamer with 3 pulp control settings—low, medium, high Auto-reversing universal juicer cone for more efficient juicing Final-Spin feature extracts more juice from pulp Extra-long Snap-Up spout accommodates more glasses and prevents dripping Cover activates Final-Spin feature and protects against dust Brushed stainless steel design Easy-clean dishwasher-safe parts Convenient cord storage Limited 3-year warranty BPA Free
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The proportion of pulp to juice varies from fruit to fruit. Juicing avocados or bananas produces a puree rather than a juice. Form leafy vegetables into compact balls or rolls before inserting into food chute. All fruits with pits and large seeds, such as nectarines, peaches, apricots, plums and cherries must be pitted before juicing. Also, it is recommended that oranges, pineapples, melons and mangoes be peeled before placing in the unit to minimize impact on juice flavor. When juicing carrots, do not pack the food chute or allow pulp container to overfill, since this may prevent correct operation or damage to the unit. Place carrots in food chute one by one, and press down gently with food pusher to extract the maximum amount of juice every time. Be prepared to rinse individual parts after each use.
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.

Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.
Though some buyers have complained about fussy assembly, I didn’t have any trouble taking the VSJ843 apart or putting it back together. None of the parts were fidgety or stuck to each other; everything locked into place and unlatched easily. The machine comes with a 15-year warranty on the motor and parts, which means you can juice with confidence for a very long time.
Warranty: No matter what kind of juicer you're getting, you want it to last. You should always get small appliances with some level of warranty, but normally the longer the warranty, the better. Not only does it show that a company is confident in its product, but it also means that if something does break, you won't have to shell out any extra cash.
And the Tribest Slowstar doesn’t just juice. It also comes with a “homogenizing” mincer attachment that grinds without extracting liquid—useful for making sorbets, nut butters, and more. I haven’t used the machine for anything other than making juice, so I can’t attest to its food-chopping and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making abilities, but you can see it in action in this DiscountJuicers.com video. The separate bowl attachment fits onto the base, using the auger to pulverize the food and push it through a large chute without a screen.
The Breville’s pulverizing power made short order of whole beets and carrots, and we cut apples in half to prep them ready for juicing. Other machines require much more prep time, as they can only manage hard produce in small pieces. We found the Breville can juice anything if it fits down the chute, and it does so very efficiently. It creates very little pulp and froth, so you know you’re getting the most out of your fruits and veggies. The included pitcher is tall, and its special juicer nozzle opening prevents juice dripping on your countertops. It also has an attached froth separator, which strains your juice for you. Its seven parts are easy to assemble, but only five are dishwasher safe.
After looking and thinking a while I triggered to get this juicer. This juicer is really useful for my mom and dad who drink mostly fruits and veggies juice. I'm really happy I decided to try out this juicer. Everyone in house using it for their own use. It is easy to use and wash. If you want less cleaning then just put a small plastic bag in the trash bin of the juicer for easier cleaning. I have washed the parts of the juicer quickly after using it so the stuff doesn't dry. It is pretty quiet. Overall this juicer has given me wonderful results and hopefully will for a long time!
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
While all juicers require scrubbing, we wanted to find the models that were as simple to clean as possible, free of nooks and crannies where pulp could collect. Despite a reputation that cold-press models will have you digging pulp out of their components for hours, our testing found that they were only slightly more difficult to clean than the centrifugal juicers.
The benefits of juicing are clear, and the staggering number of juicers sold on Amazon are a testament to the rising popularity of juicing. If you’re looking for a quality juicer, to really unlock all the micronutrients locked away in fruits and vegetables, you need to be prepared to pay anywhere from $200 to $400. There are super powerful and efficient juicers such as the Super Angel Juicers which retail close to $1000—but those are usually popular only among health professionals and nutritionists. With your hard earned money on the line, you’ll want to be sure that you really pay attention to the features of the different juicers your comparing. There are some major differences such as masticating juicers vs. centrifugal juicers, but there are also minor differences such as locking mechanisms and pulp ejection systems. Below you’ll find listed several of the most important features to pay attention to on any juicer before you buy it.
Although I don’t claim to be a healthy-living enthusiast, I do regularly enjoy grassy green juices and spicy beet turmeric shots myself. I’ve personally owned a few different juicers over the years—including long-term testing our picks for the past three years—and I also have a lot of experience working with the commercial Champion juicer in restaurant kitchens.
Make sure your juicer suits your lifestyle in terms of how quickly, and how loudly they work. Masticating juicers are much quieter than centrifugal juicers so household members remain undisturbed while you get your juice on. If you need to make your juice fresh and fast in the morning, speed may be a concern. Masticating juicers are slower while some centrifugal juicers can juice an apple in just 30 seconds. Juicer models with multiple speeds are helpful because they extract the most juice out of your produce. Slow speeds are great for juicing soft fruits, like grapes and strawberries, while high speeds are better for firmer items like apples and carrots.
Below you’ll find a short list and description of some of the juicers that we’ve found to be of the highest quality. Breville has dominated much of our consideration for the best juicers—as they did for the best espresso machines as well! They are a tremendous company that has received an absurd amount of positive feedback from customers. Nevertheless, there are several other very noteworthy juicer brands on the market such as Omega that offer strong contention for the title of ‘best juicer’. Our final list consideration has tried to account for the best product in several different price ranges, not just the most affordable or most expensive.
Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.
If you’re also into making homemade nut butter, you might want to go for the best masticating juicer you can find because besides giving you your freshly squeezed juice for the day, you also have a chance to make some preservative-free peanut butter for your PB&J. Thinking about juicers masticating your favorite fruits and vegetables may not be pretty, but it may well be worth it if you’re getting more than juice for your juicer machine.

Features: Enjoying a fresh glass of your favorite juice has never been easier. From invigorating orange juice to nutrient-rich green juice, the Hamilton Beach Premium Big Mouth Juice Extractor makes quick work of fruits and vegetables with little prep time required thanks to the large chute and powerful 1.1 Hp motor. With a 40 ounce BPA-free pitcher and an extra-large pulp bin, there is no need to stop every few seconds to empty either container. Just juice and pour. The adjustable spout on the juicer opens and closes to keep drips off the counter. When you’re done, cleanup is a snap. The patent-pending Easy Sweep cleaning tool cuts strainer cleaning time in half, and all the parts are dishwasher safe so you can juice as often as you like with minimal clean-up time. The Hamilton Beach Premium Big Mouth Juice Extractor is easy to assemble an...

It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.

Making cocktails at home doesn’t have to be complicated, but we can all aspire to more than dumping margarita mix in a blender. Over the past two years, we’ve spent 70 hours researching bar tools, speaking with some of the top bartenders in the country and testing five dozen models to bring you this guide to the absolute best items for home mixology.
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
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