In our tests, this juicer created the least amount of froth of any machine we tested, which means you get fewer bubbles and waste and more juice. Our food-prep time was minimal. This juicer has a 3-inch-wide food chute, so you don't have to spend a lot of time chopping fruits or veggies to fit. However, you need to spend some time cleaning this juicer, since it comes with nine separate parts. Still, this process is made somewhat easier by the included cleaning brush. Plus, some parts are dishwasher-safe. This is a big machine, so you probably want to find a spot on a kitchen counter to store it for daily use. It comes with a tall pitcher, a froth separator and a nonslip base so it stays in place during operation. This is a noisy juicer but no more so than any other – they're all fairly loud.
Twin gear triturating machines are usually the most expensive juicers offering the best juice yield. Twin gear juicers employ two metal counter rotating gears to crush the juicing fodder. The precise tolerance of the gears allows the juice to flow through the gap between the gears while the large pulpy matter passes along the top of the gears and is discharged.
The Hurom’s feed chute is made of opaque plastic, meaning you can’t see what’s happening as you feed produce into the juicer — is it making weird noises because it’s about to jam, or is it powering through a particularly stringy piece of celery? The chute also had a narrower mouth than most of our finalists, requiring us to quarter our apples and lemons before adding them. Not a dealbreaker, but we preferred larger, more transparent chutes as they require a little less prep work and you can see what’s going on.
Health- and budget-conscious consumers: It’s time for a fresh start! BLACK+DECKER introduces this powerful 400-watt juice extractor that will make quick work of your favorite fresh fruits and vegetables from apples and oranges to carrots and tomatoes—without putting the squeeze on your wallet. With a high quality strainer and stainless steel blades, pulp is separated out while nothing but natural, nutritious juice is effortlessly strained into the 300-ml pitcher below. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a cinch! More time for you to enjoy the fruits of (very) little labor.
It’s never been easier to juice at home with the die-cast and stainless steel Cuisinart® Juice Extractor. The 3" feed tube easily handles your favorite whole fruits and vegetables and the adjustable flow spout eliminates drips and spills for clean countertops. The 5-speed control dial is easy to operate, letting you juice the softest berries, leafiest kale, or crunchiest apple into the 1-liter pitcher. The unique filter basket reduces foam, and the unit is so quiet, you won’t wake the family while you’re making fresh, nutritious juice for breakfast! 
There are other features which give you convenience. A juicer that has a large feeding tube, for instance, means you can put in large chunks, enabling you to skip the tedious chore of chopping your produce into small pieces. A large disposal spout is also a good feature as large spouts do not easily get clogged up and have the added advantage of producing a higher volume of juice.
Make sure your juicer suits your lifestyle in terms of how quickly, and how loudly they work. Masticating juicers are much quieter than centrifugal juicers so household members remain undisturbed while you get your juice on. If you need to make your juice fresh and fast in the morning, speed may be a concern. Masticating juicers are slower while some centrifugal juicers can juice an apple in just 30 seconds. Juicer models with multiple speeds are helpful because they extract the most juice out of your produce. Slow speeds are great for juicing soft fruits, like grapes and strawberries, while high speeds are better for firmer items like apples and carrots.
Disclosure: This post is brought to you by Business Insider's Insider Picks team. We aim to highlight products and services you might find interesting, and if you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback. Have something you think we should know about? Email us at insiderpicks@businessinsider.com.
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
When your fruits or vegetables are put into a centrifugal juicer, they are grated into smaller slices and pieces through sharp teeth-like blades. These blades are usually found on the bottom of a basket-like part, such as the Nutridisk of the Breville 800JEXL, and less efficient than the augers found on masticating juicers. Juice is extracted during this process by through the pressure of centrifugal force as the ground-up parts of the fruits and vegetables are pressed against walls of a filter. The faster these juicers spin, the greater the amount of force applied during this process, and the great the amount of juice that is extracted. A typical Centrifugal juicer will have a motor with 800 watts of power or more spin at nearly 15,000 RPM and are regarded as being very noisy. The juices produced by these juicers have shorter shelf lives due to increased aeration associated with centrifugal separation processes.
A twin-gear juicer such as one of those in the Tribest Greenstar series can extract the most juice from greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, but isn’t good at juicing fruit. The juicers in this series are specialty machines usually used in professional juice bars; they’re also quite expensive. We did not test any twin-gear juicers for this review.
You should expect your juicer to have ample capabilities in storing the juice that it produces from your fruits and vegetables. Many juicers feature built-in juice collection containers, while others simply utilize an outlet which allows any container of your choosing to be used. You should consider your personal preference when considering this feature, and try to imagine how you may be using your juicer the most. If, for instance, you plan on making many servings of juice at once, you’d likely want to find a model that allowed for the easy use of custom containers. If you plan on juicing only a few servings at a time, maybe just enough for a day, you’d likely be best served by looking for juicers with built-in juicing storage containers.
Finding the time and energy to shop and juice isn't always easy. With the HealthSmart® Juice Extractor, kick-starting and maintaining a healthy lifestyle couldn’t be simpler. Just one 6 to 10-oz. serving (175-300 ml) of juice fulfills the recommended daily value of Vitamin A and D, calcium, potassium, protein – plus fiber. All without the need for extra sugar, preservatives or additives.
There are other features which give you convenience. A juicer that has a large feeding tube, for instance, means you can put in large chunks, enabling you to skip the tedious chore of chopping your produce into small pieces. A large disposal spout is also a good feature as large spouts do not easily get clogged up and have the added advantage of producing a higher volume of juice.
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods. 
×