It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.

And the Tribest Slowstar doesn’t just juice. It also comes with a “homogenizing” mincer attachment that grinds without extracting liquid—useful for making sorbets, nut butters, and more. I haven’t used the machine for anything other than making juice, so I can’t attest to its food-chopping and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making abilities, but you can see it in action in this DiscountJuicers.com video. The separate bowl attachment fits onto the base, using the auger to pulverize the food and push it through a large chute without a screen.
The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 is one of the best juicers in our review. It is a powerful machine that produces a lot of juice with very little froth output. It is quieter than most other juicers, comes with a 1000 mL pitcher and includes a long three-year warranty. If your counter space is limited, this might not be the right fit for you, but the Cuisinart Juice Extractor makes delicious and nutritious pulp-free juice with very little produce preparation needed.
The Omega J8004 is the most wallet-friendly juicer of all our picks, and it makes a good, low-pulp juice from hard roots, fruits, and greens. It yielded a good amount of carrot-apple juice, but was middle of the road when it came to green juice. It can also get gummed up by soft fruits like grapes. Because Omega has a 15-year warranty on parts and motors—the longest warranty we’ve seen—we think this machine is a better investment than anything else in its price range. But remember that the cost of under-squeezed produce can add up for lower-yield machines, even though you’ll save money up front.
Health- and budget-conscious consumers: It’s time for a fresh start! BLACK+DECKER introduces this powerful 400-watt juice extractor that will make quick work of your favorite fresh fruits and vegetables from apples and oranges to carrots and tomatoes—without putting the squeeze on your wallet. With a high quality strainer and stainless steel blades, pulp is separated out while nothing but natural, nutritious juice is effortlessly strained into the 300-ml pitcher below. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a cinch! More time for you to enjoy the fruits of (very) little labor.

Juicing is a unique way to naturally process your fruits and vegetables to maximize the nutrition you get from your foods. By chopping, crushing, and squeezing fruits and vegetables, you are helping to release all the micronutrients found within the cell walls [1] These micronutrients are very beneficial to your health and can benefit nearly every aspect of your health. Simply put, Juicing is good for you! One of the most effective means to ensure you are getting the most of these powerful enzymes and micronutrients is to juice with a high-quality juicer made just for juicing! Research has shown that using juicers, rather than blenders, is a much more effective way to release natural anti-oxidants found in fruits [2].
Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004. 

There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples.
Some compact juicers collect the pulp in an internal basket, but most others eject the pulp outside of the machine into a container that is specifically sized for the juicer. We recommend purchasing a juice extractor that ejects the pulp externally– this allows you to make larger quantities of juice without having to take extra time to stop your juicer, open it up, and empty the basket. Once you get juicing, you don’t want to have to stop before you’re finished.
I like this juicer, but I often find it leaves more residue than I would like. So I redo it and sometimes that helps. I think if there was less space for the residue to fling about, more of it might be juiced. Some of that I am sure is me, as I am new to all this. I don't find it as easy to clean as I would like, but I am lazy. It is doing wonders for the compost pile. And hopefully, me.
The gist: For those looking to get the most out of their leafy greens, the Lexen GP27 is the way to *manually* do just that. This juicer is the solution for those that don't want to lay out hundreds for an expensive masticating juicer, but also don't want to settle for a cheap, crummy manual model. As the folks at The Healthy Juicer say, this thing was designed to be "simple, mobile, versatile, and easy to clean." Simple is right. To use, just put a put a juice cup under the spout, place your greens into the chute, and start churning.  Cleaning this thing is a breeze, since all you have to do is unscrew the parts, rinse them off in the sink, and boom—you're done. Thanks to its high juice-yield and cold-press technology, you can rest assured your greens will be nutrient-packed to the max. 
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
Our top choice, the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, does a fine job extracting juice from tougher vegetables and fruits, leaving behind only a small amount of pulp. It struggled a bit with softer produce like lettuce and fresh herbs but still performed well. This is also one of the few juicers we tested that managed to make almond milk using water-soaked almonds and water.

If juicing leafy greens is an emphasis for you or you want a machine that handles other kitchen prep the Omega J8006 is your best choice. This classic cold press masticating juicer has been a best seller for years and produced the highest volume of kale juice of all the juicers we tested. It works quietly at slow speeds (only 80 RPM) to extract juice from all kinds of produce. Its dual-stage juicing system mimics how humans chew–the crush and press process produces drier pulp and high juice yield. We did have to spend more time cutting fruits and vegetables up to fit them into the small feed tube and occasionally had to stop juicing and use the “reverse” feature to handle clogs. It also produced slightly less juice from hard fruits and vegetables and as a horizontal model has a bigger countertop footprint. However, it offers additional functions such as pureeing nuts into nut butters, grinding spices and coffee, making pasta, and baby food with an extremely generous 15 year warranty.

"Love it, love it, love it. Why'd I wait so long??? I love everything about this juicer (except maybe the extra time it takes to make all that juice from the leafy greens, but you know what, it's time well spent because it's SO relaxing watching healthy juice being created as you spin the lever). I'm ditching my centrifugal juicer forever. I set up the base of this unit on my counter permanently which means about a 1 minute set up time (and probably 2-3 minutes to take apart and rinse off). Unlike the bigger, heavier juicers, these smaller pieces are so easy to wash and manage and store, light and small it all fits in a drawer and doesn't take up half of my cabinet space. And it juices most everything. I make citrus juice, cucumber/celerey juice, etc. I get about 1 cup of spinach juice from those 1lb. containers, than I freeze the spinach fiber in tablespoon sizes and throw in my smoothies (especially good with bananas) or in my soups/stocks/eggs. As for the turning of the lever, you will turn it for a while, more than you'd like to in this fast paced society, but it is effortless and like I said, fun to watch the juice produce through the clear plastic cylinder. Time passes quickly. I imagine too that the more I do this the quicker I'll become. It also pieces together with such ease and safety (so great for kids!!!)..."
Regardless of which type you choose, there's one for you on our list. For our best centrifugal juicer, we chose the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain, for its high quality, convenient wide-mouth chute, and outstanding reviews. Our favorite masticating juicer is the Omega J8006, for its quality and incredible versatility in terms of how many different things you can make with it. Our budget-friendly pick goes to the Hamilton Beach (67601A) Juicer, which is a great option for anyone who wants a solid juicer with all the necessary features without breaking the bank. 
Centrifugal: This is by far the most popular style of home juicer available due to its lower cost. A centrifugal juicer uses tiny teeth on a rapidly spinning basket to grind up vegetables, then forces the juice out through a fine mesh sieve. This system tends to produce a lot of foam, and doesn’t yield as much as a single-auger juicer. Centrifugal juicers are best for carrots and other hard fruits and vegetables. If you’re not into juicing greens or soft fruits, this is your juicer. And because centrifugal juicers are more affordable than other types, they’re also a good way to see if juicing is something you can stick with. However, if you find yourself juicing frequently, upgrading to a single-auger juicer is worth doing because you’ll make up for the price difference with higher juice yields over time.
We got more juice out of the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB than any other machine we tested. All that remained was a small amount of pulp that felt relatively dry to the touch. The Kuvings did an excellent job extracting juice from hard and soft produce in virtually all our tests. Since getting juice is the whole point of a juicer, the Kuvings got top marks.
With all of the above info in mind, you’ll be able to consider juicers, their features, and any specialized purpose they may offer with a fresh new perspective. Taking into account what features you feel will best serve your needs, you’ll be able to sift through the marketing jargon and really compare function. Many people new to juicing are often taken back by the prices of most of the juicers with good reviews. A typical juicer can vary tremendously depending on the quality of parts, the type of functionality, and any specialized features. High-RPM motors found in centrifugal juicers tend to raise cost more than the motors found in slow juicers such as masticating juicers. However, the Auger of masticating juicers often costs more than the filter and teeth used to grind up produce in the centrifugal models.
Sifting through the endless numbers of juicers can be tough, and without a concise frame of reference, you’ll likely drift aimlessly. This guide is meant to serve as a clearly-outlined reference for those looking to compare the best juicers on the market. Make no mistake, these juicers aren’t the cheapest juicers available, but they are without doubt among the best. For those already familiar with the types of juicers, the benefits of juicing, and all the other information that will be covered in this article, you can find a quick reference table below:
Kuvings released the C7000 in 2017. Kohler said this model has improved features compared with the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer (B6000), which didn’t impress us in testing. From watching a comparison review of the C7000 and the Whole Slow Juicer, we see that the C7000 has a new funnel for easily feeding produce, doesn’t produce as much pulp, and has a more recessed auger for easier cleaning compared with its predecessor. But the C7000 still spins faster than our pick at 60 rpm, and is more expensive at the time of writing. And although Kuvings juicers boast a 3-inch feed tube that, in theory, can accept whole fruit, most apples in the store are much bigger than three inches in diameter, so that’s a wash. When we tested the Whole Slow Juicer, it didn’t hold a candle to the juice quality from Tribest or Omega machines. The Kuvings Silent Juicer was also an underperformer, giving us over an ounce less of green juice than the Slowstar. The resulting juice was also unpleasantly pulpy.
The size of these two containers will help determine how much juice you can make. Some juicers such as the Juiceman JM400 Classic 2 Speed Juicer have a juice pitcher that is less than 1 liter while the pulp container is less than 1.5 liters. Some juicers offer much larger containers such as the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain Plus 850-Watt Juice Extractor and Cuisinart CJE-1000 Die-Cast Juice Extractor.
Hurom introduced one new juicer in 2017, and two in 2016, but we don’t think any top our picks. The Hurom H-AA Slow Juicer is part of the company’s newer Alpha Series. The only differences we found on the H-AA from previous models like the Hurom Elite are the shape of the juice spout and a minor adjustment to the blades on the auger, both changes that won’t significantly improve juicing performance. In 2017, Hurom released the HZ, which has the same design and technology as the H-AA but in a different, stainless steel casing (that costs $100 more). In our tests, the Hurom Elite didn’t handle different types of produce well, and jammed. The Hurom HP is a compact vertical juicer with a smaller footprint than the H-AA (7½ by 7 by 15½ inches versus 8¾ by 7¾ by 16 inches) and less capacity in the juicing assembly. Hurom has a loyal fanbase, including Oprah, and we can’t deny that these machines are good juicers. But Hurom juicers fall short in their warranty coverage, parts availability, and customer service. Hurom’s warranty covers the motor for 10 years (good) and all other parts for two years (not so good).

Lift the handle release (see Use and Care booklet for part names; the handle release is a rectangular shaped knob) and turn one quarter turn, rotate handle clockwise to extend. Lock handle release with one quarter turn. To fold for storage, allow the unit to cool, lift the handle release and turn one quarter turn, rotate handle into folded position, and lock handle release with one quarter turn.
Citrus juicers are an entirely different breed type of juicers. These juicers are designed specifically for the juicing of citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruits. These juicers are often much less expensive than masticating or centrifugal juicers but are also much less versatile. Many citrus juicers are manual press juicers, where a lever-type arm is clamped down on top of a half of a citrus fruit, which is first positioned on a sharp pointed like form. The press applies pressure on the fruit, which is squeezed down onto the sharp, cone-line device. This cone-like device presses into the center of the fruit, driving the innards outwards.
Assembling this machine is relatively straightforward, as most of the parts go in a logical location and are easy to click in and out of place. This machine does have an extra piece beneath the filter bowl that we have not seen on any other machine – a black ring, which Cuisinart's manual refers to as the "foam management filter disk." Considering that this machine produces little froth, we can assume this part does its job well. Some grater baskets are difficult to insert or remove, but this one goes on and off easily while still feeling secure.

We spent 96 hours juicing fruits and vegetables, both hard and soft, and attempted to make nut milks. In the end, our favorite juicer was the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, a powerful machine that produces excellent juice and nut milk. It leaves behind only a little pulp and less froth than any of the other juicers we tested. In addition, it has a big food chute.
Lemons and oranges should be peeled unless one wants to consume all those antifungal sprays that are sprayed on many citrus prior to storage. Even DIY home grown organic peel with no chemicals will spoil the taste just because citrus oil in peels is too strong for consumption in quantities – this is why some supermarket citrus juices have this wonderful smell combined with some bitter aftertaste. Citrus oil is good to flavour cakes and treat pimples, but not for drinking.
When your fruits or vegetables are put into a centrifugal juicer, they are grated into smaller slices and pieces through sharp teeth-like blades. These blades are usually found on the bottom of a basket-like part, such as the Nutridisk of the Breville 800JEXL, and less efficient than the augers found on masticating juicers. Juice is extracted during this process by through the pressure of centrifugal force as the ground-up parts of the fruits and vegetables are pressed against walls of a filter. The faster these juicers spin, the greater the amount of force applied during this process, and the great the amount of juice that is extracted. A typical Centrifugal juicer will have a motor with 800 watts of power or more spin at nearly 15,000 RPM and are regarded as being very noisy. The juices produced by these juicers have shorter shelf lives due to increased aeration associated with centrifugal separation processes.
If you are serious about juicing, then you’ll likely be adding all sorts of fruits and vegetables—maybe even nuts—to whatever juicer you purchase. It is important to have as much control as possible to accommodate different types of juicer recipes you may try, and speed is an important factor. Juicers with adjustable speeds allow for greater control over the consistency of your juicing. If you know that you are only going to be juicing a handful of different foods, this may be a feature you would be fine in overlooking.

Finding the time and energy to shop and juice isn't always easy. With the HealthSmart® Juice Extractor, kick-starting and maintaining a healthy lifestyle couldn’t be simpler. Just one 6 to 10-oz. serving (175-300 ml) of juice fulfills the recommended daily value of Vitamin A and D, calcium, potassium, protein – plus fiber. All without the need for extra sugar, preservatives or additives.

We spent 96 hours juicing fruits and vegetables, both hard and soft, and attempted to make nut milks. In the end, our favorite juicer was the Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000, a powerful machine that produces excellent juice and nut milk. It leaves behind only a little pulp and less froth than any of the other juicers we tested. In addition, it has a big food chute.


Juicing is a unique way to naturally process your fruits and vegetables to maximize the nutrition you get from your foods. By chopping, crushing, and squeezing fruits and vegetables, you are helping to release all the micronutrients found within the cell walls [1] These micronutrients are very beneficial to your health and can benefit nearly every aspect of your health. Simply put, Juicing is good for you! One of the most effective means to ensure you are getting the most of these powerful enzymes and micronutrients is to juice with a high-quality juicer made just for juicing! Research has shown that using juicers, rather than blenders, is a much more effective way to release natural anti-oxidants found in fruits [2].
The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
Hurom introduced one new juicer in 2017, and two in 2016, but we don’t think any top our picks. The Hurom H-AA Slow Juicer is part of the company’s newer Alpha Series. The only differences we found on the H-AA from previous models like the Hurom Elite are the shape of the juice spout and a minor adjustment to the blades on the auger, both changes that won’t significantly improve juicing performance. In 2017, Hurom released the HZ, which has the same design and technology as the H-AA but in a different, stainless steel casing (that costs $100 more). In our tests, the Hurom Elite didn’t handle different types of produce well, and jammed. The Hurom HP is a compact vertical juicer with a smaller footprint than the H-AA (7½ by 7 by 15½ inches versus 8¾ by 7¾ by 16 inches) and less capacity in the juicing assembly. Hurom has a loyal fanbase, including Oprah, and we can’t deny that these machines are good juicers. But Hurom juicers fall short in their warranty coverage, parts availability, and customer service. Hurom’s warranty covers the motor for 10 years (good) and all other parts for two years (not so good).

Centrifugal: This is by far the most popular style of home juicer available due to its lower cost. A centrifugal juicer uses tiny teeth on a rapidly spinning basket to grind up vegetables, then forces the juice out through a fine mesh sieve. This system tends to produce a lot of foam, and doesn’t yield as much as a single-auger juicer. Centrifugal juicers are best for carrots and other hard fruits and vegetables. If you’re not into juicing greens or soft fruits, this is your juicer. And because centrifugal juicers are more affordable than other types, they’re also a good way to see if juicing is something you can stick with. However, if you find yourself juicing frequently, upgrading to a single-auger juicer is worth doing because you’ll make up for the price difference with higher juice yields over time.


Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods. 
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