We got more juice out of the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB than any other machine we tested. All that remained was a small amount of pulp that felt relatively dry to the touch. The Kuvings did an excellent job extracting juice from hard and soft produce in virtually all our tests. Since getting juice is the whole point of a juicer, the Kuvings got top marks.
In more expensive juicers, such as the Super Angel Juicer, higher quality materials such as surgical-grade stainless steel are used. These types of masticating juicers also feature slightly different augers, that are closer in appearance to a car’s transmission. These twin gear systems are interlocked and are much more efficient in grinding up fruits and vegetables. However, the price tags on these juicers are considerably higher as well.
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
While juicers like the Omega and the Tribest only filled one-half to two-thirds of a standard 8-ounce drinking glass, the Hurom gave us nearly a full glass. It’s a cold-press juicer, meaning it works a little slower, but is likely to squeeze more from your fruits and veg. You can run the Hurom with one of two filters — “low pulp” and “high pulp” — but our taste-testers reported the low-pulp option was still pretty pulpy. If you’re not a fan of all that fiber, we’d suggest the Breville, below.
Centrifugal: This is the most common type of juicer sold at kitchen stores and big box retailers. It’s the most affordable. Once you feed in the vegetables or fruit, it shreds and spins very fast so that the pulp and bits of fruit and vegetables are caught by a strainer or filter and the juice spins out. Centrifugal juicers can be loud. And, because they are fast, they heat up, which can affect the nutritional value of the juice.
Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.
It's entirely possible that you're curious about buying a juicer. In case you haven't heard, juicing is trending. We're not talking about the Barry Bonds type of juicing, but the Jack LaLanne type. Recent claims have promised that drinking fresh-pressed juices can help you lose weight, boost immunity, prevent cancer and cleanse your system. Whether that's entirely true remains to be seen, but it can't hurt, right?

This is also a relatively powerful machine that doesn't require you to make a ton of cuts to your produce. We dropped two halves of a red delicious apple down the chute, and the machine easily juiced it. When it came time for us to test the hard produce, we were able to drop full beets into the tube and they juiced with little to no pressing needed on the food pusher. Some of the juicers sprayed juice, froth or pulp out their backside, getting the counter and walls dirty. This juicer had no difficulty maintaining the waste and was easy to clean.


Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier.
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