Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
After looking and thinking a while I triggered to get this juicer. This juicer is really useful for my mom and dad who drink mostly fruits and veggies juice. I'm really happy I decided to try out this juicer. Everyone in house using it for their own use. It is easy to use and wash. If you want less cleaning then just put a small plastic bag in the trash bin of the juicer for easier cleaning. I have washed the parts of the juicer quickly after using it so the stuff doesn't dry. It is pretty quiet. Overall this juicer has given me wonderful results and hopefully will for a long time!
After pushing almost 40 pounds of leafy, crunchy, pulpy produce through nine juicers, we think the Tribest Slowstar is the best and most versatile machine for home use. It yielded more juice than nearly every other model we tested while keeping foam and temperature increases to a minimum. It comes with a 10-year warranty on parts, so you can crank it up every day without worrying about wear and tear.

These are also called centrifugal juicers, have a spinning mesh basket with a grated bottom. Produce is whirled against the grate, shredding it and releasing the juice. Pulp spins into a separate basket, while the juice runs out the device’s spout. Centrifugal juicers work much faster than masticating juicers, but are also quite a bit louder and yield less juice. They work very well on the fruits and veggies most likely to be juiced, such as apples, oranges, and carrots, but tend to struggle with leafy greens like kale. These juicers are the less expensive choice.


Juicing isn’t a trend that will go away anytime soon. While some of what is being said online about the benefits of juicing is purely pulp fiction, there are still some benefits to this healthy habit. Namely, enabling certain individuals to add vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients to their diet. These particular individuals are those who seem to have difficulty incorporating fruits and vegetables into their daily meals. In any case, if you want to try juicing or would like to replace an out-of-date juicer in your kitchen, we’ve got just the guide to help you find the best match.
The gist: If you immediately think "Jamba Juice" when you see this juicer, good call. It's the brainchild of the widely-known juice chain. Since Jamba Juice knows a thing or two about juicing, they made sure to give this baby a *super* wide chute— three and a half inches wide, to be exact, which is the largest available of any juicer. This basically eliminates the need for pre-cutting. It comes with an impressive 1100-watt motor and two speed settings, so you can adjust speed depending on what you're juicing in order to maximize juice output. The Jamba Juicer comes with a few little extra goodies, like a clean sweep cleaning brush and a recipe book filled with juice and pulp recipes. 
The Omega VSJ843 is one of the slowest and quietest machines we’ve tested, and it produces juices without much foam. The VSJ843 produced almost as much green juice as our top pick, the high-yielding Tribest. So if you’re a devoted green juicer, you might prefer this Omega to our pick. However, for most people, its higher price, slightly lower yields on carrot-apple juice, and lack of versatility make it a second choice to our top pick.
Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.

Also, we realize that $300-plus is a lot to spend on a small appliance, but we’ve found that paying a bit more for your machine up front is worth doing. Juicing is a costly habit no matter how you do it. Although the initial investment on our pick is high, you won’t be throwing money out with partially extracted, soggy pulp. You can also check eBay and Craigslist for used juicers, especially Omegas and Huroms, because they’ve been around a while. A lot of people sell their machines after realizing they’re not ready to give up the money, counter space, or time required to make juice regularly. You won’t be able to take advantage of the warranty, but you can get really good deals (and even resell yours if you get tired of it).
Cuisinart is one of the most well-known kitchen appliance companies, with products like coffee makers, outdoor grills and many others. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 holds up to the company's standards by providing everything you need to commit to a cup of fresh juice every day or for a full-on juice fast. Its extra-large 3-inch chute means you can drop in whole apples, pears and oranges without having to remove seeds, which saves time. All of the Cuisinart Juice Extractor's impressive features have earned it our Top Ten Reviews Gold Award.
In our testing, we focused on making green juice from 8 ounces each of curly kale and green grapes. This test showed us how each machine handled both soft fruit and tough greens. Fibrous greens are hard to break down, and a high-quality juicer will squeeze more juice from leaves than cheaper models. Soft fruit, like seedless grapes, is a challenge for juicers for the opposite reason—it lacks the fiber that helps the juicer pull the fruit completely through the chamber, and can gum up the works.
During juicing and cleanup, we also took note of how easy the machines were to use and clean. To see how efficient each model was at extraction, we measured juice yields by weight. In addition, we checked how much pulp was left over, looked for foam (which can be a sign of oxidation), and took note of if juicers backed up or jammed during juicing. We also measured the temperature of the juice, and compared it with the temperature of the produce we started out with. Finally, we tasted each juice for freshness and pulp, docking points from machines that yielded juice with unpleasant levels of fiber. Flavor is also an indicator of how much of the greens actually made it into the glass—sweeter juices had more grape and didn’t do as good of a job juicing greens.

The Tribest Slowstar, a vertical single-auger, slow-press juicer, is the most versatile juicer we’ve found, efficiently handling thick greens, fruits, and root vegetables. In our tests, it yielded the highest amount of green juice and nearly the highest amount of hard-vegetable juice with low effort, experienced no motor jams, and generated minimal foam. It also has a generous feed-tube opening, which makes for quicker prep and easier juicing. This quiet machine is backed with a 10-year warranty that covers the motor and parts, one of the better guarantees among the juicers we tested.

Features: From the smallest lime to the largest grapefruit, this sleek brushed stainless steel citrus juicer gets out more juice more efficiently. An adjustable auto-reversing reamer features “custom” pulp control settings, and the unique Final-Spin feature maximizes the amount of juice from each piece of fruit. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a breeze. Features: Adjustable reamer with 3 pulp control settings—low, medium, high Auto-reversing universal juicer cone for more efficient juicing Final-Spin feature extracts more juice from pulp Extra-long Snap-Up spout accommodates more glasses and prevents dripping Cover activates Final-Spin feature and protects against dust Brushed stainless steel design Easy-clean dishwasher-safe parts Convenient cord storage Limited 3-year warranty BPA Free
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
×