The machine’s individual parts have smoother surfaces than those on the older Omega VRT400, making this machine easier to clean. While cleaning the unit, I didn’t need to use the included cleaning brush at all; I just hosed down the parts with the spray nozzle on my sink. Our top pick takes a bit more effort to clean because it has small dimples at the bottom of the juicing screen, requiring use of the included brush to release all pulp.

Not sure what to do with the leftover pulp? The leftover pulp is mostly fiber and cellulose, which like the juice, contains necessary vital nutrients for the daily diet. Any leftover pulp can be used in a variety of recipes, frothy drinks, casseroles or soups, as well as for garden composting. Thirsty for something other than juice? The HealthSmart® Juice Extractor can help children, teens and adults get their daily vitamin intake with the option of making soy, almond or rice milk. To start, soak one cup of soybeans, almonds or rice in four cups of water for 24 to 48 hours in the refrigerator, and then slowly pour one cup into the food chute. The liquid extracted from the soaked mixture is the "milk." For enhanced milk flavor, consider adding vanilla or honey.

The Tribest Solostar 4 is a horizontal juicer, like our budget pick, the Omega J8004. It has a slightly squatter body and a marginally smaller footprint, but compared with that Omega model, the pricier Tribest Solostar produced smoother juice but at a significantly slower pace. The whole juicing assembly on the Tribest wiggled in a tight circular motion while the motor was running, and gave a bit every time we pushed produce through the feed tube (we tested two different units of the same model).
Cuisinart is one of the most well-known kitchen appliance companies, with products like coffee makers, outdoor grills and many others. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 holds up to the company's standards by providing everything you need to commit to a cup of fresh juice every day or for a full-on juice fast. Its extra-large 3-inch chute means you can drop in whole apples, pears and oranges without having to remove seeds, which saves time. All of the Cuisinart Juice Extractor's impressive features have earned it our Top Ten Reviews Gold Award.

Since there are nine parts that need to be disassembled and cleaned after each juicing session, it can take a little longer to hand wash this juicer. While Cuisinart states that these parts can be washed on the top rack of a dishwasher, they recommend hand washing to prevent warping. It can be really difficult cleaning the mesh cylinder that surrounds the grater, but fortunately this juicer comes with a cleaning brush, which works effectively to unplug those holes fast. If you’d prefer fewer parts to take apart and wash might want to look at the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB, which works well and has only five parts to clean.
The two most popular types of juicers are centrifugal juicers and masticating juicers. These different types of juicers utilize very different approaches in how they grind up fruits and vegetables. Both have advantages and disadvantages distinct to their design, and both have groups that feel one particular type of juicer is the best juicer. Before you proceed much further in looking for the best juicer possible, you should strongly consider your own personal juicing needs. For example, if you’re only ever going to be juicing lemons and oranges, you’ll likely be best served by buying a citrus juicer. If, on the other hand, you plan on juicing loads of Organic Wheat Grass, you’ll likely be best served by focusing your search on masticating juicers.

Equipped with a 1000-watt powerful motor, this easy-to-use juice extractor makes it exceptionally convenient to enjoy fresh, healthy fruit and vegetable juice from the comfort of home. The unit's large 3-inch feeding chute can accommodate whole apples, pears, and other large-size fruits and vegetables (extra-large items may need to be cut into smaller pieces first).


It does a superior, although not perfect, job with hard produce and zips through soft produce easily. It leaves some pulp that doesn't have all the nutritious fluid extracted from it but not enough to be a problem. On the downside, we had to do quite a bit of chopping ahead of time so that the pieces of fruit and vegetables would fit through the food chute. This juicer is easy to care for. It takes only a little time to assemble and clean, and various parts are dishwasher-safe. The machine also comes with a cleaning brush, as well as a froth separator and a tall pitcher. This is a big machine, and it is noisy but at a decibel level comparable with other good-quality juicers. You can get help with the juicer over email, but there is no phone number for customer support.
In our testing, we focused on making green juice from 8 ounces each of curly kale and green grapes. This test showed us how each machine handled both soft fruit and tough greens. Fibrous greens are hard to break down, and a high-quality juicer will squeeze more juice from leaves than cheaper models. Soft fruit, like seedless grapes, is a challenge for juicers for the opposite reason—it lacks the fiber that helps the juicer pull the fruit completely through the chamber, and can gum up the works.
We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one! 

Reasonable footprint: Juicers can be rather in-your-face appliances, depending on size and noise level. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space. The oval bases hover around 7 to 8 inches in diameter. You can tuck a vertical juicer into a corner quite easily, though they are generally tall (about 16 to 18 inches) and require cabinet clearance. Because horizontal juicers can hog a lot of space, we preferred vertical juicers.
The Tribest Slowstar, a vertical single-auger, slow-press juicer, is the most versatile juicer we’ve found, efficiently handling thick greens, fruits, and root vegetables. In our tests, it yielded the highest amount of green juice and nearly the highest amount of hard-vegetable juice with low effort, experienced no motor jams, and generated minimal foam. It also has a generous feed-tube opening, which makes for quicker prep and easier juicing. This quiet machine is backed with a 10-year warranty that covers the motor and parts, one of the better guarantees among the juicers we tested.
When deciding which type of juicer is for you, the first thing you’ll need to think about is what kinds of juice you’d like to make most often. Look for a juicer with high yields for the produce you’ll be juicing. Masticating juicers work best for leafy greens, producing high amounts of dry pulp which mean less waste and cost in the long term. If you’ll only be juicing fruits and hard vegetables, a high-quality, less expensive centrifugal juicer may be your best bet.
Kuvings released the C7000 in 2017. Kohler said this model has improved features compared with the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer (B6000), which didn’t impress us in testing. From watching a comparison review of the C7000 and the Whole Slow Juicer, we see that the C7000 has a new funnel for easily feeding produce, doesn’t produce as much pulp, and has a more recessed auger for easier cleaning compared with its predecessor. But the C7000 still spins faster than our pick at 60 rpm, and is more expensive at the time of writing. And although Kuvings juicers boast a 3-inch feed tube that, in theory, can accept whole fruit, most apples in the store are much bigger than three inches in diameter, so that’s a wash. When we tested the Whole Slow Juicer, it didn’t hold a candle to the juice quality from Tribest or Omega machines. The Kuvings Silent Juicer was also an underperformer, giving us over an ounce less of green juice than the Slowstar. The resulting juice was also unpleasantly pulpy.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.
The gist: This Hamilton Beach model is perfect for either those who are just getting into juicing or even seasoned juicers who simply don't want to break the bank by spending several hundred bucks on a juicer.  It cranks out 800 watts of power and has a 3-inch-wide chute that you can fit whole foods into (for example, a whole apple), so you can spend less time cutting and prepping. All of the juicer's removable parts are dishwasher safe, which makes clean-up super easy. Plus, it even comes with a handy cleaning brush.
We tested the same three recipes in each juicer to see how well each machine performed with various types of fruits and vegetables: soft produce, leafy greens and hard foods. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor yielded a high percentage of juice for each recipe. What's more, most of the juice extracted had little to no froth, so it was easier to drink straight from the machine. Most juicers struggle when it comes to juicing leafy greens and nuts, but this machine handled both relatively well. Most of the other machines were unable to effectively process almonds, but this juicer was able to create a decent amount of almond milk, with the almonds finely shredded and collected in the pulp container.
The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
Finding the time and energy to shop and juice isn't always easy. With the HealthSmart® Juice Extractor, kick-starting and maintaining a healthy lifestyle couldn’t be simpler. Just one 6 to 10-oz. serving (175-300 ml) of juice fulfills the recommended daily value of Vitamin A and D, calcium, potassium, protein – plus fiber. All without the need for extra sugar, preservatives or additives.
Hurom introduced one new juicer in 2017, and two in 2016, but we don’t think any top our picks. The Hurom H-AA Slow Juicer is part of the company’s newer Alpha Series. The only differences we found on the H-AA from previous models like the Hurom Elite are the shape of the juice spout and a minor adjustment to the blades on the auger, both changes that won’t significantly improve juicing performance. In 2017, Hurom released the HZ, which has the same design and technology as the H-AA but in a different, stainless steel casing (that costs $100 more). In our tests, the Hurom Elite didn’t handle different types of produce well, and jammed. The Hurom HP is a compact vertical juicer with a smaller footprint than the H-AA (7½ by 7 by 15½ inches versus 8¾ by 7¾ by 16 inches) and less capacity in the juicing assembly. Hurom has a loyal fanbase, including Oprah, and we can’t deny that these machines are good juicers. But Hurom juicers fall short in their warranty coverage, parts availability, and customer service. Hurom’s warranty covers the motor for 10 years (good) and all other parts for two years (not so good).
Born and raised in Paris, the land of unapologetic butter, Francois has spent the last 20 years shaping the American culinary world behind the scenes. He was a buyer at Williams-Sonoma, built the Food Network online store, managed product assortments for Rachael Ray's site, started two meal delivery businesses and runs a successful baking blog. When he's not baking a cake or eating his way through Europe, Francois enjoys sharing cooking skills with cooks of all levels. Rules he lives by: "Use real butter" and "Nothing beats a sharp knife."

The Omega VSJ843 features a dual-edged auger that looks almost identical to the auger on the Tribest Slowstar. The space on the underside of the auger is roomy, so wiping out packed solid vegetable matter with your finger is easy. In his video review of the Omega VSJ843, Kohler mentions that the Omega had a few stoppages as he juiced two pounds of carrots, but we didn’t experience that during our tests.

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Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
We tested the same three recipes in each juicer to see how well each machine performed with various types of fruits and vegetables: soft produce, leafy greens and hard foods. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor yielded a high percentage of juice for each recipe. What's more, most of the juice extracted had little to no froth, so it was easier to drink straight from the machine. Most juicers struggle when it comes to juicing leafy greens and nuts, but this machine handled both relatively well. Most of the other machines were unable to effectively process almonds, but this juicer was able to create a decent amount of almond milk, with the almonds finely shredded and collected in the pulp container.
Assembling this machine is relatively straightforward, as most of the parts go in a logical location and are easy to click in and out of place. This machine does have an extra piece beneath the filter bowl that we have not seen on any other machine – a black ring, which Cuisinart's manual refers to as the "foam management filter disk." Considering that this machine produces little froth, we can assume this part does its job well. Some grater baskets are difficult to insert or remove, but this one goes on and off easily while still feeling secure.
The gist: For those looking to get the most out of their leafy greens, the Lexen GP27 is the way to *manually* do just that. This juicer is the solution for those that don't want to lay out hundreds for an expensive masticating juicer, but also don't want to settle for a cheap, crummy manual model. As the folks at The Healthy Juicer say, this thing was designed to be "simple, mobile, versatile, and easy to clean." Simple is right. To use, just put a put a juice cup under the spout, place your greens into the chute, and start churning.  Cleaning this thing is a breeze, since all you have to do is unscrew the parts, rinse them off in the sink, and boom—you're done. Thanks to its high juice-yield and cold-press technology, you can rest assured your greens will be nutrient-packed to the max. 
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