The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 is one of the best juicers in our review. It is a powerful machine that produces a lot of juice with very little froth output. It is quieter than most other juicers, comes with a 1000 mL pitcher and includes a long three-year warranty. If your counter space is limited, this might not be the right fit for you, but the Cuisinart Juice Extractor makes delicious and nutritious pulp-free juice with very little produce preparation needed.
Juicing isn’t for everyone. Registered dietitian Sylvia North warned us that “if you have a clinically diagnosed inflammatory bowel or kidney disease, some nutrients found in high concentrations in green juices may not be appropriate.” If you’re navigating any health challenges, it’s best to talk to your registered dietitian or doctor before you shop for a juicer.

Disclosure: This post is brought to you by Business Insider's Insider Picks team. We aim to highlight products and services you might find interesting, and if you buy them, we get a small share of the revenue from the sale from our commerce partners. We frequently receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product is featured or recommended. We operate independently from our advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback. Have something you think we should know about? Email us at [email protected]
Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.

It does a superior, although not perfect, job with hard produce and zips through soft produce easily. It leaves some pulp that doesn't have all the nutritious fluid extracted from it but not enough to be a problem. On the downside, we had to do quite a bit of chopping ahead of time so that the pieces of fruit and vegetables would fit through the food chute. This juicer is easy to care for. It takes only a little time to assemble and clean, and various parts are dishwasher-safe. The machine also comes with a cleaning brush, as well as a froth separator and a tall pitcher. This is a big machine, and it is noisy but at a decibel level comparable with other good-quality juicers. You can get help with the juicer over email, but there is no phone number for customer support.
Low foam production: The foam that accumulates on top of your juice is a good indicator of how much air has been whipped into your juice by the machine, and more air exposure equals more oxidation. Oxidation is a controversial topic. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, “Because juicing mixes together the contents of living cells, including active enzymes and various reactive and oxygen-sensitive substances, fresh juices are unstable and change rapidly.” So the prevailing theory among juicers is that if less oxygen is whipped into a juice, the valuable nutrients and enzymes remain more intact. But as Kohler told us, there’s not much peer-reviewed research on how or if oxidation affects the nutrient contents of your juice. “It’s all manufacturers’ data for the most part,” he said, “which I take with a grain of salt.” That said, we still prioritized machines that produced less foam, because at the very least, oxidation can cause your green juice to turn brown, and may lead to some muddy, off flavors.
A twin-gear juicer such as one of those in the Tribest Greenstar series can extract the most juice from greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, but isn’t good at juicing fruit. The juicers in this series are specialty machines usually used in professional juice bars; they’re also quite expensive. We did not test any twin-gear juicers for this review.
Features: It’s never been easier to create fresh, nutritious fruit and vegetable juices at home. The Cuisinart® Juice Extractor features a 3" feed tube that easily handles whole fruits and vegetables. The adjustable flow spout eliminates drips and spills for clean countertops, and the 5-speed control dial is easy to operate. The specially designed filter basket reduces foam, and the unit is so quiet, you won’t wake the family while you’re making juice for breakfast! Features Die-cast and stainless steel housing Exclusive easy unlock and lift system Exclusive foam management filter disk Exclusive anti-drip adjustable flow spout Quiet operation Large 3 inch feed tube for whole fruits and vegetables 5-speed dial control with blue LED light ring 2-liter pulp container 1-liter juice pitcher Easily juices hard and soft produce All...
We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.
Masticating juicers use an Auger, which is very similar in appearance to a drill-bit. Mos feature some sort of cork-screw type design that chops up food while pressing it forward at the same time. This is a very efficient means of applying force and therefore requires the less powerful motor. Typically, a masticating juicer’s auger is made of a high-density plastic like the GE Ultem found on the Breville 800JEXL. the use of these durable materials is favorable, considering the auger is the part doing all the work.
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
The gist: To add another Breville model to the list, we've got the 800JEXL. Though it comes with a heftier price tag than the JE98XL, the 800JEXL is called "elite" for a reason. Breville endearingly refers to this model as the "Rolls Royce" of juicers, with its powerful 1000-watt motor and heavy grade die-cast metal body.  Like the JE98XL, it has a dual high/low-speed switch so you can switch depending on if you're juicing hard or soft produce. This model's "fast" speed setting beats the JE98XL at 13,000rpm, so the process is a bit quicker. In terms of overall quality, the 800JEXL is definitely top notch and great for any serious juicer looking to make a worthy investment.
This juicer is worth it's value. That said I note that since it is a sintrifical force juicer it seems to make much more frof then other slow grind type juicers and the remining pulp is still wet, so not all of the juice was removed ( or more could have been removed). I do like the eaz of break-Down and and reassemble and it is easy to clean. It is small enough for the counter or storage area. If you are starting out and looking to explore the world of juicing - start right here. Enjoy!!

The best juicers extract as much liquid as possible from fruits and vegetables, leaving behind very little pulp. Machines that leave large amounts of very moist pulp just aren’t doing their job. The same is true for froth. Every juicer makes some froth, but you don't want inches of bubbles – you want a machine that gives you the most juice for your money.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
When your fruits or vegetables are put into a centrifugal juicer, they are grated into smaller slices and pieces through sharp teeth-like blades. These blades are usually found on the bottom of a basket-like part, such as the Nutridisk of the Breville 800JEXL, and less efficient than the augers found on masticating juicers. Juice is extracted during this process by through the pressure of centrifugal force as the ground-up parts of the fruits and vegetables are pressed against walls of a filter. The faster these juicers spin, the greater the amount of force applied during this process, and the great the amount of juice that is extracted. A typical Centrifugal juicer will have a motor with 800 watts of power or more spin at nearly 15,000 RPM and are regarded as being very noisy. The juices produced by these juicers have shorter shelf lives due to increased aeration associated with centrifugal separation processes.

Breville’s top of the line commercial-grade centrifugal juicer doesn’t disappoint. Boasting a super strong and fast 1000-watt motor with 2 speed controls this machine plows through piles of fruits and vegetables in a flash and gets highly rated juicer reviews. The variable speed options give you more control–Breville recommends using the high speed setting (13,000 RPM) for hard fruits and vegetables and low setting (6,500 RPM) for softer fruits and vegetables. While it does make noise equivalent to a blender, it works so quickly you won’t have to listen long. A 3” feed tube lets you juice whole fruits and vegetables with significantly less prep time. This juicer is built to last with titanium reinforced cutting blades that stay sharp longer and made entirely of die-cast materials but be aware that it only has a 1 year warranty. Breville does sell replacement parts on their website. We love the included 1-liter juice jug with built in froth separator and cover. This juicer is perfect for juicing in bulk–it has a large capacity external pulp container so you can juice piles of fruits and vegetables with no breaks. It didn’t extract as much juice out of kale as other models we tried did; but unless your juicing emphasis is on leafy greens this juicer is perfect for high volume juicing.
Lift the handle release (see Use and Care booklet for part names; the handle release is a rectangular shaped knob) and turn one quarter turn, rotate handle clockwise to extend. Lock handle release with one quarter turn. To fold for storage, allow the unit to cool, lift the handle release and turn one quarter turn, rotate handle into folded position, and lock handle release with one quarter turn.
These are the cheapest citrus juicers available that can create a lot of mess making a cup of orange juice. It also has a cone-shaped head on which you have to squeeze the half-cut fruit in order to juice it. The pulp and seeds are collected on the top of the strainer and the juice gets collected in the cup. The pulp and the seeds are also mixed with the juice if the size of the holes on the strainer is wide.

After pushing almost 40 pounds of leafy, crunchy, pulpy produce through nine juicers, we think the Tribest Slowstar is the best and most versatile machine for home use. It yielded more juice than nearly every other model we tested while keeping foam and temperature increases to a minimum. It comes with a 10-year warranty on parts, so you can crank it up every day without worrying about wear and tear.
Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.
You are eligible for a full refund if no ShippingPass-eligible orders have been placed. You cannot receive a refund if you have placed a ShippingPass-eligible order. In this case, the Customer Care team will remove your account from auto-renewal to ensure you are not charged for an additional year and you can continue to use the subscription until the end of your subscription term.
Accessories include a 2-liter pulp container that makes it easy to discard unwanted pulp and a 1-quart juice pitcher for collecting juice to serve at the breakfast table or to store in the refrigerator for later. The unit's removable parts clean up easily by hand or in the dishwasher, and a cleaning brush comes included. Housed in die cast and stainless steel, the juice extractor measures approximately 15-2/5 by 11-4/5 by 19 inches.
And the Tribest Slowstar doesn’t just juice. It also comes with a “homogenizing” mincer attachment that grinds without extracting liquid—useful for making sorbets, nut butters, and more. I haven’t used the machine for anything other than making juice, so I can’t attest to its food-chopping and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making abilities, but you can see it in action in this DiscountJuicers.com video. The separate bowl attachment fits onto the base, using the auger to pulverize the food and push it through a large chute without a screen.
The proportion of pulp to juice varies from fruit to fruit. Juicing avocados or bananas produces a puree rather than a juice. Form leafy vegetables into compact balls or rolls before inserting into food chute. All fruits with pits and large seeds, such as nectarines, peaches, apricots, plums and cherries must be pitted before juicing. Also, it is recommended that oranges, pineapples, melons and mangoes be peeled before placing in the unit to minimize impact on juice flavor. When juicing carrots, do not pack the food chute or allow pulp container to overfill, since this may prevent correct operation or damage to the unit. Place carrots in food chute one by one, and press down gently with food pusher to extract the maximum amount of juice every time. Be prepared to rinse individual parts after each use.
Regardless of which type you choose, there's one for you on our list. For our best centrifugal juicer, we chose the Breville JE98XL Juice Fountain, for its high quality, convenient wide-mouth chute, and outstanding reviews. Our favorite masticating juicer is the Omega J8006, for its quality and incredible versatility in terms of how many different things you can make with it. Our budget-friendly pick goes to the Hamilton Beach (67601A) Juicer, which is a great option for anyone who wants a solid juicer with all the necessary features without breaking the bank. 
Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.
This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.
In our testing, we focused on making green juice from 8 ounces each of curly kale and green grapes. This test showed us how each machine handled both soft fruit and tough greens. Fibrous greens are hard to break down, and a high-quality juicer will squeeze more juice from leaves than cheaper models. Soft fruit, like seedless grapes, is a challenge for juicers for the opposite reason—it lacks the fiber that helps the juicer pull the fruit completely through the chamber, and can gum up the works.
Considering the 15-year warranty on the Omega J8004 model’s motor and parts, we think this is the best value juicer you can get compared with cheaper models with shorter warranties. Although its price is more palatable than the Tribest’s, there are some trade-offs. First, the J8004 is quite big, requiring a 16-by-7-inch space on the counter. It also isn’t great with softer, juicy fruits, which get gummy and block the juicer; you’ll need to alternate adding different types of produce when juicing with this machine to keep it running. And, as we mentioned earlier, its feed tube is an inch narrower than the Tribest’s, which makes a difference in how much prep work you need to do with vegetables. Because the J8004 is a budget machine, you’ll save about $150 up front, but you may lose some of those savings in juice left behind in the pulp you toss when juicing things like kale. Compared with the rest of the competition, however, we still think the J8004 extracts more juice from produce.
Juicing advocates advise that you start with a basic, centrifugal juicer-only model so you can get the hang out of juicing. You can then move on to the multitasking masticating and triturating ones as soon as you become adept at juice extraction. If your looking for more in-depth juicer reviews or juicer comparisons, click here to check out the top reviews.
×