The Omega J8004 is the most wallet-friendly juicer of all our picks, and it makes a good, low-pulp juice from hard roots, fruits, and greens. It yielded a good amount of carrot-apple juice, but was middle of the road when it came to green juice. It can also get gummed up by soft fruits like grapes. Because Omega has a 15-year warranty on parts and motors—the longest warranty we’ve seen—we think this machine is a better investment than anything else in its price range. But remember that the cost of under-squeezed produce can add up for lower-yield machines, even though you’ll save money up front.

The two most popular types of juicers are centrifugal juicers and masticating juicers. These different types of juicers utilize very different approaches in how they grind up fruits and vegetables. Both have advantages and disadvantages distinct to their design, and both have groups that feel one particular type of juicer is the best juicer. Before you proceed much further in looking for the best juicer possible, you should strongly consider your own personal juicing needs. For example, if you’re only ever going to be juicing lemons and oranges, you’ll likely be best served by buying a citrus juicer. If, on the other hand, you plan on juicing loads of Organic Wheat Grass, you’ll likely be best served by focusing your search on masticating juicers.


We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
This machine does come with a 1000 mL pitcher, which means it could hold roughly three 12-ounce sodas. Fresh juice does not keep for long, so you typically wouldn’t make lots of it in advance; however, if you are making juice for your family or for the next day or two, it is nice not to have to stop and empty the pulp. You can get through a lot of produce before you need to pause.
If a significant portion of your calories are going to come from juice each day, mix up your produce. Go with veggie-heavy juices, using just a bit of fruit for sweetness. Alternate types of produce, and try something entirely new periodically. Farmers markets and ethnic grocery stores are great spots to find fruits and vegetables you’ve never tasted before.

Choose from five speed settings by turning the control dial with the blue LED light ring, then watch as freshly extracted juice flows effortlessly from the anti-drip adjustable flow spout. The thoughtfully designed appliance also provides an exclusive easy unlock and lift system, a filter basket specially designed to reduce foam, and a high-quality design that runs quietly--no need to wake up the whole family when getting an early start on the day.
If you're looking to get into the home-juicing game — good for you! You're doing something great for your health and will also probably save a ton of money on store-bought juices that can cost up to $12 per 12 oz. bottle. However, when it comes to making your own juices, the kind of juicer you use can really make or break your experience. Don't worry, we're here to help. To start, we compiled a list of the top-rated juicers according to Amazon reviews. 
The juicer's side has an indent that molds perfectly to the shape of the pitcher so you always know where to place it. The pitcher lid has an opening at the top that allows juice to drain from the juicer's nozzle directly into the pitcher. There is also a nifty piece of plastic that prevents any froth from making its way from the pitcher to your cup. In our testing, we found that this separator worked well to keep our juice froth-free so you could enjoy it right away. If you prefer froth in your juice, you can remove the separator.
Centrifugal juicers are also not as efficient as masticating juicers in terms of generating yield. The pulp that comes out of centrifugal juicers is still relatively wet which means that less of the juice is extracted. You cannot count on centrifugal juicers to extract high yields of juice from high-fiber leafy greens like wheat-grass, spinach, and lettuce.
These are also called cold-press or auger-style juicers. These devices have an auger that grinds the produce, breaking down cell walls and releasing the juice, which is then squeezed through a steel screen. Masticating juicers take longer than extractors to produce your cup of juice, but yield more juice and leave more of the nutrients intact. If you like green juices with plenty of leafy, tough greens like kale, you’ll be happiest with this type of juicer. Many can also be used to make nut milk. You’ll pay quite a bit more for a cold-press juicer, however.
Yes, the Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fast and popular. But this centrifugal juicer paled in comparison with the slow juicers we tested. The yields were low and it was the least effective at juicing greens. In my one-bedroom apartment, you can’t hear the television in the living room when a Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fired up in the kitchen. It also has only a one-year warranty.
When it comes to super convenient press juicer, you’re looking for something that is easy to use, juices fast, and can be tucked away without any effort. Most importantly, it needs to be an easy to clean juicer, so you can juice in a hurry. These are all features that you’ll find in this juicer, and maybe that’s why its been consistently rated as one of the top rated press juicers in 2013 and 2014
The VSJ843 makes almost-pulp-free juices, certainly the smoothest juice I’ve ever produced in a home kitchen. And it has a high yield, too. It made slightly less carrot-apple juice than the Tribest, yielding 15.15 ounces, putting it near the middle of the pack among machines we tested in 2015. But it had the second highest green juice yields of any juicer we tested, producing 12 ounces of kale-apple juice.
Making cocktails at home doesn’t have to be complicated, but we can all aspire to more than dumping margarita mix in a blender. Over the past two years, we’ve spent 70 hours researching bar tools, speaking with some of the top bartenders in the country and testing five dozen models to bring you this guide to the absolute best items for home mixology.
These are also called cold-press or auger-style juicers. These devices have an auger that grinds the produce, breaking down cell walls and releasing the juice, which is then squeezed through a steel screen. Masticating juicers take longer than extractors to produce your cup of juice, but yield more juice and leave more of the nutrients intact. If you like green juices with plenty of leafy, tough greens like kale, you’ll be happiest with this type of juicer. Many can also be used to make nut milk. You’ll pay quite a bit more for a cold-press juicer, however.
Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.
Juicing is an amazing way to get loads of hard-to-come-by micronutrients and natural enzymes into your system, all while lessening the workload for your digestive system. Producing this juice means chopping, slicing, and squeezing your fruits and veggies into tiny little pieces to release to the most juice possible. When you are dealing with such small food particles, you will quickly find they have a strong tendency to get stuck in cracks and crevasses.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
The VSJ843 makes almost-pulp-free juices, certainly the smoothest juice I’ve ever produced in a home kitchen. And it has a high yield, too. It made slightly less carrot-apple juice than the Tribest, yielding 15.15 ounces, putting it near the middle of the pack among machines we tested in 2015. But it had the second highest green juice yields of any juicer we tested, producing 12 ounces of kale-apple juice.
Regardless of which juicer you end up buying, the fact that you are shopping for one speaks volumes. You are likely among the growing number of people who have realized the ‘typical’ diet is a poor one. Healthcare is so inter-related with proper diet and nutrition that is shouldn’t even be considered a separate facet of our lives. Hippocrates, regarded as many to be the father of modern medicine, was quoted as saying ‘Let  food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” This ancient Greek quote certainly may be outdated, but with the growing awareness of the dangers of modern diets and food ingredients, it’s never been more relevant that it is today.
The Omega VSJ843 is a great option for green-juice fans. Juice from this machine is virtually pulp-free and full of flavor with minimal foam, and the yield for green juice was especially high. The machine itself has a lower profile than the Tribest and runs at a quiet hum. Plus, cleaning the VSJ843 model’s parts is easier than cleaning those of other juicers. Omega’s 15-year warranty guarantees this machine will earn its keep over time. It isn’t as all-purpose as our top pick, however, with lower yields on carrot-apple juice and no nut-butter attachments. Plus it costs more.
These are also manual citrus juicers. They have an arm on left/right side that you have to pull down to force the juice out of the fruit. The mechanism is quite simple. You put a half-cut fruit on the bottom squeezing part and then use the handle to pull down the top squeezing part onto that forcefully to press the juice out. The arms are mostly made out of metal and on some low-cost models they can break with undue force. They are also known as citrus presses because there is no reaming action involved in it.
There are plenty of juicers available between $60 and $160. We tested ten products within this range and found more expensive juicers are not necessarily better. Perks like multiple speed settings, a long warranty and an included pitcher appeared at several different price points, as did the absence of accessories. We advise shopping the features instead of letting price alone guide you.
Considering the 15-year warranty on the Omega J8004 model’s motor and parts, we think this is the best value juicer you can get compared with cheaper models with shorter warranties. Although its price is more palatable than the Tribest’s, there are some trade-offs. First, the J8004 is quite big, requiring a 16-by-7-inch space on the counter. It also isn’t great with softer, juicy fruits, which get gummy and block the juicer; you’ll need to alternate adding different types of produce when juicing with this machine to keep it running. And, as we mentioned earlier, its feed tube is an inch narrower than the Tribest’s, which makes a difference in how much prep work you need to do with vegetables. Because the J8004 is a budget machine, you’ll save about $150 up front, but you may lose some of those savings in juice left behind in the pulp you toss when juicing things like kale. Compared with the rest of the competition, however, we still think the J8004 extracts more juice from produce.
If the Breville juice fountain elite is a little too high end for you, but you still want a quality juicer, the Breville juice fountain plus is a great option. This juicer has a great balance of all features- speed, efficiency, simplicity, durability and price, meaning its a great all round centrifugal juicer. Read our review here, and see if you agree with us- its extremely easy to use (and to clean!) while still providing beautiful quality juice at record time. A strong contender…
Easy to clean: We’ve found that all juicers have one thing in common—they’re a bit of a pain to clean. The parts aren’t dishwasher safe, so you have to clean the components by hand. And they have a lot of small nooks and crannies that can trap gunk. We looked for vertical juicers that come with specialized brushes to make cleaning easier, and considered horizontal models, like those from Omega, that are a little simpler to clean because the juicing screens aren’t as big.
Masticating juicers mimic “chewing” fruits and vegetables using augers with sharp metal teeth. They then press the maximum amount of juice from the pulp resulting in high yields and very little foaming or oxidization. This technique allows for easy juicing of leafy greens such as wheatgrass, spinach, and kale. Also known as “slow” or “cold-press” juicers, these models take more time to produce juice but don’t heat it up, which is thought to preserve more nutrients. They tend to be quieter and operate at a low hum. Their stronger motors come at a higher cost but enable additional features like making nut butters, baby food, sorbets, and even pasta. Masticating Juicers cost upwards of $200 and are more of an investment for the serious juicer.
Easy to assemble, easy to use, extremely fast juicing, easy to clean, compact, lightweight, and beautiful to look at. The Breville Compact Juice Fountain is our pick for Best Compact Juicer. It boasts a 3” feed tube that lets you juice whole apples in 3 seconds flat as well as a very handy 25 oz Juice Jug with storage lid and optional froth separator. This juicer is all about speed, convenience, and simplicity–we highly recommend it for those who are tight on space but want to juice frequently and quickly. It’s titanium cutting disc and high-powered 700-watt motor pack a punch (but also make a blender-volume level of noise.) We couldn’t believe how quickly it juiced everything from strawberries to whole apples to whole carrots and kale. As with most centrifugal juicers, it didn’t yield as much juice from kale as masticating models but the difference was slight. A very high-design machine, we also love the internal pulp container –it conserves counter space and keeps cleanup and assembly simple. However, this isn’t the juicer for you if you plan to juice in bulk; you’ll need to pause to disassemble the juicer to empty the pulp container. As with all the juicers we reviewed, it comes with a cleaning brush and the parts are dishwasher safe. At only $99 it’s also an incredible value and comes with a 1 year warranty.
Auger-style juicers, sometimes referred to as masticating or cold-press juicers, crush and mash the produce. They're typically more expensive, and can also take some getting used to as the augers can jam when grinding tough fruits and veggies. For this reason, every one we tested has a reverse button. The upside with this style is they tend to leave more healthful and fiber-rich pulp in the juice.
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