Juicing is a unique way to naturally process your fruits and vegetables to maximize the nutrition you get from your foods. By chopping, crushing, and squeezing fruits and vegetables, you are helping to release all the micronutrients found within the cell walls [1] These micronutrients are very beneficial to your health and can benefit nearly every aspect of your health. Simply put, Juicing is good for you! One of the most effective means to ensure you are getting the most of these powerful enzymes and micronutrients is to juice with a high-quality juicer made just for juicing! Research has shown that using juicers, rather than blenders, is a much more effective way to release natural anti-oxidants found in fruits [2].


The Omega J8004 is the most wallet-friendly juicer of all our picks, and it makes a good, low-pulp juice from hard roots, fruits, and greens. It yielded a good amount of carrot-apple juice, but was middle of the road when it came to green juice. It can also get gummed up by soft fruits like grapes. Because Omega has a 15-year warranty on parts and motors—the longest warranty we’ve seen—we think this machine is a better investment than anything else in its price range. But remember that the cost of under-squeezed produce can add up for lower-yield machines, even though you’ll save money up front.

Centrifugal: This is the most common type of juicer sold at kitchen stores and big box retailers. It’s the most affordable. Once you feed in the vegetables or fruit, it shreds and spins very fast so that the pulp and bits of fruit and vegetables are caught by a strainer or filter and the juice spins out. Centrifugal juicers can be loud. And, because they are fast, they heat up, which can affect the nutritional value of the juice.
We used three recipes to test how well each juicer handled hard produce (apples, carrots, etc.), soft produce (salad greens, fresh herbs, etc.) and almonds. In our test kitchen, we measured the results precisely, noted the amount of juice and pulp that emerged, and scored each juicer on performance. We also measured the noise in decibels, monitored spills or splatters, timed assembly and cleanup efforts, and noted such specifications as juicer dimensions and electrical cord length.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
Since there are nine parts that need to be disassembled and cleaned after each juicing session, it can take a little longer to hand wash this juicer. While Cuisinart states that these parts can be washed on the top rack of a dishwasher, they recommend hand washing to prevent warping. It can be really difficult cleaning the mesh cylinder that surrounds the grater, but fortunately this juicer comes with a cleaning brush, which works effectively to unplug those holes fast. If you’d prefer fewer parts to take apart and wash might want to look at the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB, which works well and has only five parts to clean.
The juicer's side has an indent that molds perfectly to the shape of the pitcher so you always know where to place it. The pitcher lid has an opening at the top that allows juice to drain from the juicer's nozzle directly into the pitcher. There is also a nifty piece of plastic that prevents any froth from making its way from the pitcher to your cup. In our testing, we found that this separator worked well to keep our juice froth-free so you could enjoy it right away. If you prefer froth in your juice, you can remove the separator.
After three years of use and a second round of testing, the Tribest Slowstar is still turning out high-yield, flavorful juices. We’re confident it’s still the best juicer for its price. The machine itself shows only light wear, and all the juicing parts—auger, juicing screen, and feed tube—are in perfect working order. The key to longevity is to let the machine work at its own pace, and to cut vegetables into smallish pieces that can easily fit through the feed tube. Impatiently cramming vegetables and fruit through the feed tube leads to jamming.
The Hurom comes with a lidded pitcher for collecting juice, but its slow-turning auger produced so little splatter that we also had no problem putting our own glass directly under the juice spout. Clean juicing makes for means you’re not beholden to the Hurom’s pitcher, making it easier to juice straight into your to-go cup and reducing counter clean-up. (When we tried this with the Juiceman, we ended up with a foot-wide splatter radius.)
Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.
Then we repeated our tests with hard fruits and vegetables, using 8 ounces each of carrots and apples, 4 ounces of celery, and 1 ounce of ginger. In 2015, we tested our three picks against new contenders: the Kuvings Silent Juicer, Juicepresso Platinum, Tribest Solostar, and Omega NC800. We searched for new and notable models from 2017 and 2018 for this update, but didn’t find any worth testing.
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