We like this juicer a lot. It has a HUGE container to catch the pulp, so you can make lots of juices at once and bottle them. Also, the chute is really wide - we throw whole (smallish) apples, oranges and pears in it so we don't have to mess with slicing everything up. It pulverizes everything with no problem. The spout releasing the juice is a little wonky; we had a hard time figuring out what was actually fully open vs. fully closed (we are smart people with college degrees, I swear...it is honestly just a little unclear when you are twisting it). The pitcher catching the juice is great; it has a nice spout for us to easily pour it directly into bottles. The main downside is that it is a pain in the butt to clean, but that is every single juicer on the market, not just this one, so you can't hold that against it. Overall, we would definitely recommend this one!
It's entirely possible that you're curious about buying a juicer. In case you haven't heard, juicing is trending. We're not talking about the Barry Bonds type of juicing, but the Jack LaLanne type. Recent claims have promised that drinking fresh-pressed juices can help you lose weight, boost immunity, prevent cancer and cleanse your system. Whether that's entirely true remains to be seen, but it can't hurt, right?
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
"I kept putting this item in my cart deciding between this one and the next higher version. My friend had the next size but she also has a very large kitchen and plenty of counter space, while me I have 1/4 of the counter space. After about a month in my basket I decided to give it a try. I'm glad I did buy this compact version, it's perfect for me. I make one container full and clean out the where the pulp is stored. It also stores nicely under my cabinet, which the other version would not. Since this is my first juicer, I'm not sure how 'dry' the pulp should be but to me it's pretty dry. Not something that is bone dry but enough that I can probably make a small ball out of the pulp...mind you I haven't tried it but may. I also juiced Kale and Swiss Chard I saw quite a bit of juice coming out. I did with the recommendation of rolling it up in a small tight ball and it worked. Not sure if it was because the kale and Swiss chard were straight from the garden to the juicer but I definitely did see juice coming out."
Assembling this machine is relatively straightforward, as most of the parts go in a logical location and are easy to click in and out of place. This machine does have an extra piece beneath the filter bowl that we have not seen on any other machine – a black ring, which Cuisinart's manual refers to as the "foam management filter disk." Considering that this machine produces little froth, we can assume this part does its job well. Some grater baskets are difficult to insert or remove, but this one goes on and off easily while still feeling secure.
There are plenty of juicers available between $60 and $160. We tested ten products within this range and found more expensive juicers are not necessarily better. Perks like multiple speed settings, a long warranty and an included pitcher appeared at several different price points, as did the absence of accessories. We advise shopping the features instead of letting price alone guide you.
However, considering that it’s the compensation for healthier, more nutritious juices, the 2 minute wait is not exactly a deal breaker. Plus, since the juice is cold-pressed and is exposed to very minimal oxidation, it can be stored up to 72 hours in the fridge. That means you can actually save more time than using a fast juicer, since the juices made with fast machines typically degrade within a couple hours after they’re made.
The Hamilton Beach 67650A Juice Extractor comes with a useful 20-ounce container/pitcher, but the tall design also means that there's plenty of room for your own receptacle under the spout. Although Hamilton Beach doesn't give an actual size for the pulp bin, it is more than adequate. As is common with modern juicers, the removable parts are dishwasher safe.
Single-auger juicers: An auger is like a big, threaded screw that pulls fruit or vegetables into the juicing chamber and presses the juice out. The auger can turn anywhere from 43 to 80 rpm, resulting in slowly produced, low-foam, low-temperature, high-volume, and nutrient-dense juice. Single-auger juicers can be oriented vertically or horizontally and are very versatile, good for greens and hard roots. Although vertical and horizontal juicers work on the same principle, vertical juicers have a smaller footprint and slightly larger yield. But vertical models are generally in the $300 to $400 range, so they’re not for the occasional juice drinker. They’re best suited for those who include fresh green juice as part of a daily routine and are concerned about low oxidation and maximum yield. And certain models, like our pick, have food-mincing and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making capabilities. All of our picks are single-auger juicers: the Tribest Slowstar and Omega VSJ843 are examples of vertical single-auger juicers, and the Omega J8004 is a horizontal single-auger juicer.
This juicer does not come with a pitcher, which is atypical in the juicing world. Instead, you simply put a glass beneath its spout and let the juice run into it. It also lacks a strainer, so you get plenty of pulp with the liquid. If you want the extra fiber, that’s great. If you prefer a smoother, less-textured drink, you need to use a strainer of your own as well as a pitcher or other container to capture strained juice. The juicer is somewhat noisy and does vibrate, like most, but it stays securely in place due to its nonskid base. In addition, the machine has two clips on either side to hold the lid firmly in place, which is a nice safety feature.
Juicing diets, juicing fasts, and juicing cleanses are all popular terms that get tossed around with the subject of juicing. This leaves a lot of people with the impression that juicing has to be a giant change you make in your life. The truth is, nearly everyone can benefit from juicing, even if it’s only a serving or two in the morning! By Grinding up your fruits and vegetables into a finely-filtered juice, you are removing a lot of the calories found in your foods—but keeping all the nutrients. Juicing is kind of like pre-digesting your foods, and has shown hints of helping to ensure proper overall digestive health [3].
Before you even glance at any of the products sold in the market today, you need to be able to differentiate between the two types of juicers. Centrifugal juicers are the most affordable in the market. These typically have a metal blade that whirls around to cut the fruits and veggies and then spins the pieces to extract the juice from the pulp. Centrifugal juicers are usually cheaper, fast, easy to use, and easy to clean. However, they also have a lower juice yield, generates more foam (lessens the juice’s shelf life), and are generally not good at juicing leafy greens.
Juicing isn’t for everyone. Registered dietitian Sylvia North warned us that “if you have a clinically diagnosed inflammatory bowel or kidney disease, some nutrients found in high concentrations in green juices may not be appropriate.” If you’re navigating any health challenges, it’s best to talk to your registered dietitian or doctor before you shop for a juicer.
The flavor of the Tribest juice was as fresh and bright as any I’ve had at boutique juice bars, with a nice balance between the kale and the grapes. The hue was a vibrant green, like Technicolor in a glass. The foam was minimal, too, measuring half an inch above the top of the surface of the juice; lesser juicers had up to four inches of foam at the top. The Tribest also handled 21 ounces of hard and fibrous vegetables and fruits like a champ. In our 2015 testing, the carrot-apple-celery-ginger juice yield was 15.3 ounces, the second-best result of all the models tested.

Centrifugal (pronounced sin-tra-fue-gal) are the types of juicers that many people are most familiar with. These juicers have been popular for the longest time, and most closely resemble a blender. These juicers utilize a special kind of force called centrifugal force, which is closely related to things that rotate. Basically, it means that if you spin something around really fast, it’s going to move away from the point around which it is spinning. If you spin your arm around in circles quickly, you can feel your hand swelling. This is because the centrifugal force is acting on the fluids in your body, moving them away from your should—which is the center of rotation—and towards your hand. What this Newtonian tangent means, is that centrifugal juicers apply force to your fruits and vegetables by spinning around really fast!


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When the device is plugged in, a blue ring of light will blink around the On/Off button. There are five different settings to choose from when using this device. To start it, you turn the dial to the desired speed and then press the button. In general, to get the best juicing yield softer produce should be juiced at lower settings while harder produce should be juiced at higher settings. We measured the noise level at 82 dB, which makes this the second quietest juicer in our lineup. This is surprising considering how efficiently it juices. It also has rubber non-slip feet and doesn't vibrate excessively when juicing.

Twin-gear juicers: For greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, a twin-gear juicer extracts the most juice. Twin-gear juicers are also the most expensive models, often costing over $500. As the name suggests, two gears work together to crush the cell walls of the vegetable and extract the juice. They’re best for greens and other tough fibrous vegetables and not great for fruit.

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Some compact juicers collect the pulp in an internal basket, but most others eject the pulp outside of the machine into a container that is specifically sized for the juicer. We recommend purchasing a juice extractor that ejects the pulp externally– this allows you to make larger quantities of juice without having to take extra time to stop your juicer, open it up, and empty the basket. Once you get juicing, you don’t want to have to stop before you’re finished.
The Omega VSJ843 is one of the slowest and quietest machines we’ve tested, and it produces juices without much foam. The VSJ843 produced almost as much green juice as our top pick, the high-yielding Tribest. So if you’re a devoted green juicer, you might prefer this Omega to our pick. However, for most people, its higher price, slightly lower yields on carrot-apple juice, and lack of versatility make it a second choice to our top pick.

The VSJ843 makes almost-pulp-free juices, certainly the smoothest juice I’ve ever produced in a home kitchen. And it has a high yield, too. It made slightly less carrot-apple juice than the Tribest, yielding 15.15 ounces, putting it near the middle of the pack among machines we tested in 2015. But it had the second highest green juice yields of any juicer we tested, producing 12 ounces of kale-apple juice.
Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control
These are also called cold-press or auger-style juicers. These devices have an auger that grinds the produce, breaking down cell walls and releasing the juice, which is then squeezed through a steel screen. Masticating juicers take longer than extractors to produce your cup of juice, but yield more juice and leave more of the nutrients intact. If you like green juices with plenty of leafy, tough greens like kale, you’ll be happiest with this type of juicer. Many can also be used to make nut milk. You’ll pay quite a bit more for a cold-press juicer, however.
The Omega VRT400HDS is a masticating juicer—preferred by many for releasing more enzyme rich juices—but makes use of a vertical design to allow a more streamlined juicing experience. This vertical design allows for more efficient pressure to be applied, as well as being a more compact design. This juicer is great if you’re serious about juicing, and have a diet that requires high-volumes of fresh-squeezed juice.

Features: People are not only eating healthier, they’re drinking healthier, too! Now Cuisinart helps them do it without giving up too much counter space. The Compact Juice Extractor turns fruits and vegetables into tasty and nutritious juices in seconds – with the touch of a single button! Features: Powerful, easy and quiet operation One-touch operation of on/off push button with blue LED makes juicer easy to use Juice Pitcher holds up to 16 ounces of juice, and can be replaced for uninterrupted juicing Pulp container collects up to 40 ounces and is removable for easy cleaning Food Pusher fits securely into feed tube to guide fruits and vegetables properly while juicing Cover with large feed tube minimizes prepping and pre-cutting Adjustable flow spout is manually controlled and prevents dripping Mesh filter basket and blade assem...
Of course, it's important to note that this is an entry-level model, so it is lacking in some features. For example, it only has two settings - "on" and "off " — so it'll either juice what you put in there, or it won't. It's also a little loud, and according to some reviews, can get messy. In general, this is best for those just getting into juicing and who don't necessarily know if it'll be a long-term investment for them.

Reasonable footprint: Juicers can be rather in-your-face appliances, depending on size and noise level. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space. The oval bases hover around 7 to 8 inches in diameter. You can tuck a vertical juicer into a corner quite easily, though they are generally tall (about 16 to 18 inches) and require cabinet clearance. Because horizontal juicers can hog a lot of space, we preferred vertical juicers.
In our tests, the Tribest Slowstar consistently outperformed its competitors, delivering high yields of delicious juices from a variety of fruits and vegetables with minimal effort. Compared with other juicers we tested, the Slowstar is quieter and less likely to jam, and it generates less foam. With an impressive 10-year warranty on the motor and parts, we think it’s a worthwhile investment for people who juice regularly.
Part of a Healthy Lifestyle* According to the USDA, "The benefits of eating fruits and vegetables daily are undeniable. People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet, are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases, including heart attack and stroke, certain cancers, heart disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes. It's also been proven to reduce the risk of developing kidney stone, decrease bone loss, ease muscle aches, alleviate high blood pressure and add years to your life." * Source: USDA, 2012 "Healthy Eating on a Budget." www.choosemyplate.gov 

All things considered, shopping for a juicer is like balancing needs, features, and budget. If you are looking to buy a high-quality juicer that will likely meet any demand you have for it (within reason), you can expect to pay anywhere from $150 to $400. The difference in price for the higher-quality juicers are typically found in capacity and overall power. Less expensive, high-quality juicers will often be labeled as ‘compact’. Below you’ll find a listing of many of the most popular juicers on the market today, all of which have received thousands of 5-star reviews online. Yes, thousands. These products have been put to the test by juicers all around the world, and are regarded by nutrition specialists as being the best at providing nutritionally-dense juicers at home. All of these products are available for purchase through Amazon, most have free shipping, and they are all backed by a manufacturer’s warranty.
Through this process of leveraged force, the bulk of the juice is forced from the fruit and is then often passed through a filter into a juice collection chamber. Many electric juicers utilize a spinning point to increase the efficiency of juice production, which is preferred by many. Citrus juicers are great if you are making fresh lemonades, orange juices, or recipes which call for large amounts of fresh citrus juices. Producing juice from a single citrus fruit really isn’t much of a chore, but if you have the need to juice large amounts of citrus fruits, these juicers can help you save tons of time!
"Love it, love it, love it. Why'd I wait so long??? I love everything about this juicer (except maybe the extra time it takes to make all that juice from the leafy greens, but you know what, it's time well spent because it's SO relaxing watching healthy juice being created as you spin the lever). I'm ditching my centrifugal juicer forever. I set up the base of this unit on my counter permanently which means about a 1 minute set up time (and probably 2-3 minutes to take apart and rinse off). Unlike the bigger, heavier juicers, these smaller pieces are so easy to wash and manage and store, light and small it all fits in a drawer and doesn't take up half of my cabinet space. And it juices most everything. I make citrus juice, cucumber/celerey juice, etc. I get about 1 cup of spinach juice from those 1lb. containers, than I freeze the spinach fiber in tablespoon sizes and throw in my smoothies (especially good with bananas) or in my soups/stocks/eggs. As for the turning of the lever, you will turn it for a while, more than you'd like to in this fast paced society, but it is effortless and like I said, fun to watch the juice produce through the clear plastic cylinder. Time passes quickly. I imagine too that the more I do this the quicker I'll become. It also pieces together with such ease and safety (so great for kids!!!)..."
The US Department of Agriculture warns against relying on juice as your sole source of nutrition. This kind of diet won’t give you enough protein or fiber to maintain muscle mass and keep you feeling full. When we spoke with nutritionist Shereen Lehman, she reiterated this point. “Juicing alone won’t fix an unhealthy diet,” she told us. “It’s also important to cut out the junk foods and eat more lean protein sources, dairy or calcium sources, whole grains, and more fruits and veggies.”

Easy to use: In our experience, the size of a juicer’s feed tube makes the biggest difference when it comes to ease. The smaller the feed tube, the more time you need to prep your produce—kale needs to be cut into thinner, more manageable strips, large apples can’t be cut into simple wedges, and those fat carrots need to be quartered lengthwise instead of simply halved. During the course of a busy morning, those minutes can really add up, so we looked for juicers with larger tubes.
Citrus juicers are an entirely different breed type of juicers. These juicers are designed specifically for the juicing of citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruits. These juicers are often much less expensive than masticating or centrifugal juicers but are also much less versatile. Many citrus juicers are manual press juicers, where a lever-type arm is clamped down on top of a half of a citrus fruit, which is first positioned on a sharp pointed like form. The press applies pressure on the fruit, which is squeezed down onto the sharp, cone-line device. This cone-like device presses into the center of the fruit, driving the innards outwards.
The Cuisinart Juice Extractor CJE-1000 is one of the best juicers in our review. It is a powerful machine that produces a lot of juice with very little froth output. It is quieter than most other juicers, comes with a 1000 mL pitcher and includes a long three-year warranty. If your counter space is limited, this might not be the right fit for you, but the Cuisinart Juice Extractor makes delicious and nutritious pulp-free juice with very little produce preparation needed.
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