"ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!!!!!! I have had A LOT of juicers over the years and this one blows them all away! it is super fast and pulp is super dry. you get way more than twice the juice! I juiced a lot of veg, 2 pitchers (that it comes with about 4 cups each) and the pulp container was not even half full, yet there was no pulp in the juice! I've even had the slow masticating juicers, this is better. easy to put together, take apart and clean!!!!! i love it in every way. and before you believe that juice from slow juicers is better for you, look it up, thats what i did, and its not as long as its done fast with a good juicer! I truly love this juicer in every way! I will never go back to the lower end ones (that cost about the same anyway, oh brother!) or the expensive slow hard to use and clean ones! Wish i had this in the beginning of my juicing ventures 20 years ago!!!!!!!!!!!"
The Hurom comes with a lidded pitcher for collecting juice, but its slow-turning auger produced so little splatter that we also had no problem putting our own glass directly under the juice spout. Clean juicing makes for means you’re not beholden to the Hurom’s pitcher, making it easier to juice straight into your to-go cup and reducing counter clean-up. (When we tried this with the Juiceman, we ended up with a foot-wide splatter radius.)

All juicers need to be washed by hand immediately after juicing for the easiest cleanup, otherwise you’ll be stuck scrubbing at dried-on bits of pulp. Most juicers come with special brushes to clean the nooks and crannies that normal sponges cannot reach. John Kohler said that although you can sterilize your juicer parts in boiling water, he doesn’t recommend doing so because it can cause those parts to break down faster.
Masticating juicers use an Auger, which is very similar in appearance to a drill-bit. Mos feature some sort of cork-screw type design that chops up food while pressing it forward at the same time. This is a very efficient means of applying force and therefore requires the less powerful motor. Typically, a masticating juicer’s auger is made of a high-density plastic like the GE Ultem found on the Breville 800JEXL. the use of these durable materials is favorable, considering the auger is the part doing all the work.
This juicer does not come with a pitcher, which is atypical in the juicing world. Instead, you simply put a glass beneath its spout and let the juice run into it. It also lacks a strainer, so you get plenty of pulp with the liquid. If you want the extra fiber, that’s great. If you prefer a smoother, less-textured drink, you need to use a strainer of your own as well as a pitcher or other container to capture strained juice. The juicer is somewhat noisy and does vibrate, like most, but it stays securely in place due to its nonskid base. In addition, the machine has two clips on either side to hold the lid firmly in place, which is a nice safety feature.
I researched and compared several mid priced juicers to the most expensive I could find. $150 was the most I wanted to spend because I recently bought a Vita-Mix blender ($500+). I finally decided on the Breville Juice Fountain Plus JE 95XL (850 watts). But Bed, Bath and Beyond, failed to have it it stock. I made it out there without calling to see if they had it in stock and again, they did not. Not wanting to leave empty handed, I started looking at some of the other juicers they had. That's when I came across the Cuisinart CJE-1000.

Chef Liana Green told us that a good juicer can “juice green leafy vegetables and produce a high yield from ingredients.” The most efficient juicers will squeeze your fruits and veggies dry. The centrifugal juicers averaged a speedy two minutes per glass of juice, but they also tended to be quite messy, splattering juice everywhere if we placed our own glasses beneath the juice spouts. The cold-press juicers were generally quieter and neater during juicing, leaving us with a much cleaner countertop — but they required about seven minutes to fill one glass.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
Features: Overwhelmed by all the juice options available today? Looking for the ideal juice drink that's fresh, free of preservatives and tastes 10 times better than store-bought juices? Take the plunge and go with Hamilton Beach's Big Mouth® Pro Juice Extractor. Rated “Most Efficient” in a recent issue of Food & Wine magazine, the Big Mouth® Pro Juice Extractor packs all the same punch that you would expect from a Hamilton Beach juice extractor, featuring reliable efficiency, high speed and no-fuss cleanup. With a powerful 1.1 horsepower (Hp) motor and extra-wide feed chute that fits almost anything you put in, it flawlessly performs the task of extracting the juice from a whole apple in 3 seconds flat. What’s more, the designers of Hamilton Beach have minimized the fuss of cleanup, so you can thoroughly clean in no time flat and enjoy ...
Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier.
In our tests, the Tribest Slowstar consistently outperformed its competitors, delivering high yields of delicious juices from a variety of fruits and vegetables with minimal effort. Compared with other juicers we tested, the Slowstar is quieter and less likely to jam, and it generates less foam. With an impressive 10-year warranty on the motor and parts, we think it’s a worthwhile investment for people who juice regularly.
All things considered, shopping for a juicer is like balancing needs, features, and budget. If you are looking to buy a high-quality juicer that will likely meet any demand you have for it (within reason), you can expect to pay anywhere from $150 to $400. The difference in price for the higher-quality juicers are typically found in capacity and overall power. Less expensive, high-quality juicers will often be labeled as ‘compact’. Below you’ll find a listing of many of the most popular juicers on the market today, all of which have received thousands of 5-star reviews online. Yes, thousands. These products have been put to the test by juicers all around the world, and are regarded by nutrition specialists as being the best at providing nutritionally-dense juicers at home. All of these products are available for purchase through Amazon, most have free shipping, and they are all backed by a manufacturer’s warranty.

It is very good unit for juicing carrots, apples and similar harder veggies. We used it today (03/15/2016) for large amount of carrot juice (over one gallon, with breaks every liter and to empty pulp container) and it came out with minimum foam, good consistency and reasonably dry pulp. Position of the chute is good, no leaks, no splatter, no mess, regardless it is 1000 watts on highest speed. Unit’s cutting basket has very minimal vibrations which disappear more of less at normal speed and there is floating mechanism added to electric motor that works out the vibrations quite nicely. Well, after all it is a centrifugal juicer not a satellite guiding system, therefore little thing like this is expected and not bothersome. Locking mechanism on this juicer is very well designed, and base is actually made from magnesium like casting, which makes it bottom heavy and quite sturdy. The opening on top is large, so I would be very careful and never leave this unit unattended if one has little child of the kind that can get into trouble in split second.. Granted this is not a grinder, but I feel compelled to mention this - we all should know that little kids, active cell phones, laud TV’s and tired parents when all on can become potentially harmful combination.
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It does a superior, although not perfect, job with hard produce and zips through soft produce easily. It leaves some pulp that doesn't have all the nutritious fluid extracted from it but not enough to be a problem. On the downside, we had to do quite a bit of chopping ahead of time so that the pieces of fruit and vegetables would fit through the food chute. This juicer is easy to care for. It takes only a little time to assemble and clean, and various parts are dishwasher-safe. The machine also comes with a cleaning brush, as well as a froth separator and a tall pitcher. This is a big machine, and it is noisy but at a decibel level comparable with other good-quality juicers. You can get help with the juicer over email, but there is no phone number for customer support.

The cleaning of this CJE-1000 is easy and fast as there are no nooks and hidden compartments like some juicers have. Shell of the units top is made of high impact ABS, it is very well made and fits perfectly. Cuisinart did excellent job in design how the parts fit – if it is not correctly assembled it will not start. Also, the motor has automatic thermal reset fuse, not like some major and expensive brand which I used to have and will never touch again for that very reason. One day you will overheat the juicer and I you do not have auto thermal reset, you will be shipping it for repairs. Not with this juicer. ThankYou Cuisinart !!!.


Features: From the smallest lime to the largest grapefruit, this sleek brushed stainless steel citrus juicer gets out more juice more efficiently. An adjustable auto-reversing reamer features “custom” pulp control settings, and the unique Final-Spin feature maximizes the amount of juice from each piece of fruit. Dishwasher-safe parts make cleanup a breeze. Features: Adjustable reamer with 3 pulp control settings—low, medium, high Auto-reversing universal juicer cone for more efficient juicing Final-Spin feature extracts more juice from pulp Extra-long Snap-Up spout accommodates more glasses and prevents dripping Cover activates Final-Spin feature and protects against dust Brushed stainless steel design Easy-clean dishwasher-safe parts Convenient cord storage Limited 3-year warranty BPA Free

Masticating juicers use an Auger, which is very similar in appearance to a drill-bit. Mos feature some sort of cork-screw type design that chops up food while pressing it forward at the same time. This is a very efficient means of applying force and therefore requires the less powerful motor. Typically, a masticating juicer’s auger is made of a high-density plastic like the GE Ultem found on the Breville 800JEXL. the use of these durable materials is favorable, considering the auger is the part doing all the work.


Everyone from Wall Street bankers to Beyoncé is talking about juice cleanses, but registered dietitian Emily Braaten urged us to be wary: “There is no substantial scientific evidence to support the use of freshly squeezed juice for ‘cleansing’ purposes. Humans rely on the liver and the kidneys to separate out potentially toxic byproducts of metabolism.” The National Institutes of Health (NIH) point out that each of your kidneys “is made up of about a million filtering units” that remove about one to two quarts of waste and extra fluid a day via your urine. In other words, your body already has the whole detox thing covered.
We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
We found vertical masticating juicers like the Tribest Slowstar to be easier to assemble, use, and clean than horizontal models with a sleek modern look for your countertop. Made by a company specializing in the wellness market; the Slowstar’s double bladed auger creates a double cut, doing twice as much work compared to a traditional auger while operating at a low hum. It has a generous feed tube that makes it easier to prep produce with no motor jams at all–even putting whole leaves and stems of kale directly into the juicer. The pulp from the Tribest Slowstar was also the driest of all the tests–this juicer machine squeezes every bit of juice from produce with high yields. We loved the slightly thicker results of the carrot-apple juice test but if you don’t care for pulpy juices this may not be the best model for you. The Slowstar also serves as a multi-purpose kitchen tool; an included Mincing Attachment lets you make sorbets, nut butters, and even cookie dough. It comes with a generous 10-year warranty and is our top vertical masticating choice to keep on the counter for juicing and other kitchen tasks.
Twin-gear juicers: For greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, a twin-gear juicer extracts the most juice. Twin-gear juicers are also the most expensive models, often costing over $500. As the name suggests, two gears work together to crush the cell walls of the vegetable and extract the juice. They’re best for greens and other tough fibrous vegetables and not great for fruit.
Centrifugal: This is the most common type of juicer sold at kitchen stores and big box retailers. It’s the most affordable. Once you feed in the vegetables or fruit, it shreds and spins very fast so that the pulp and bits of fruit and vegetables are caught by a strainer or filter and the juice spins out. Centrifugal juicers can be loud. And, because they are fast, they heat up, which can affect the nutritional value of the juice.
The juicer also has a big enough mouth for larger pieces of fruit, and in many cases, you'll be able to fit an entire fruit or vegetable in there without having to cut it up at all. That cuts down on prep time and ensures you won't have to dirty up knives and cutting boards to make some juice. The motor inside the juicer is 850-watt, and the device comes with a liter jug, a froth separator, and a cleaning brush.
Accessories include a 2-liter pulp container that makes it easy to discard unwanted pulp and a 1-quart juice pitcher for collecting juice to serve at the breakfast table or to store in the refrigerator for later. The unit's removable parts clean up easily by hand or in the dishwasher, and a cleaning brush comes included. Housed in die cast and stainless steel, the juice extractor measures approximately 15-2/5 by 11-4/5 by 19 inches.
"Love it, love it, love it. Why'd I wait so long??? I love everything about this juicer (except maybe the extra time it takes to make all that juice from the leafy greens, but you know what, it's time well spent because it's SO relaxing watching healthy juice being created as you spin the lever). I'm ditching my centrifugal juicer forever. I set up the base of this unit on my counter permanently which means about a 1 minute set up time (and probably 2-3 minutes to take apart and rinse off). Unlike the bigger, heavier juicers, these smaller pieces are so easy to wash and manage and store, light and small it all fits in a drawer and doesn't take up half of my cabinet space. And it juices most everything. I make citrus juice, cucumber/celerey juice, etc. I get about 1 cup of spinach juice from those 1lb. containers, than I freeze the spinach fiber in tablespoon sizes and throw in my smoothies (especially good with bananas) or in my soups/stocks/eggs. As for the turning of the lever, you will turn it for a while, more than you'd like to in this fast paced society, but it is effortless and like I said, fun to watch the juice produce through the clear plastic cylinder. Time passes quickly. I imagine too that the more I do this the quicker I'll become. It also pieces together with such ease and safety (so great for kids!!!)..."

Below you’ll find a short list and description of some of the juicers that we’ve found to be of the highest quality. Breville has dominated much of our consideration for the best juicers—as they did for the best espresso machines as well! They are a tremendous company that has received an absurd amount of positive feedback from customers. Nevertheless, there are several other very noteworthy juicer brands on the market such as Omega that offer strong contention for the title of ‘best juicer’. Our final list consideration has tried to account for the best product in several different price ranges, not just the most affordable or most expensive.
Chef Liana Green told us that a good juicer can “juice green leafy vegetables and produce a high yield from ingredients.” The most efficient juicers will squeeze your fruits and veggies dry. The centrifugal juicers averaged a speedy two minutes per glass of juice, but they also tended to be quite messy, splattering juice everywhere if we placed our own glasses beneath the juice spouts. The cold-press juicers were generally quieter and neater during juicing, leaving us with a much cleaner countertop — but they required about seven minutes to fill one glass.
Features: Two cones rotate both ways to squeeze every drop of juice from fruit! The small cone squeezes more juice from small fruits like oranges, lemons and limes, while the large cone is perfect for grapefruit. Adjustable pulp control lets you get the amount of pulp you want and built-in cord storage keeps the cord neat and out of the way. All parts are dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup! Juicing Made Easy Clear-View Juice Container Easy-to-Read Measurements Easy-Pour Spout Storage Cover Cord Storage Built to Perform 2 Self-Reversing Cones Adjustable Pulp Control

And the Tribest Slowstar doesn’t just juice. It also comes with a “homogenizing” mincer attachment that grinds without extracting liquid—useful for making sorbets, nut butters, and more. I haven’t used the machine for anything other than making juice, so I can’t attest to its food-chopping and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making abilities, but you can see it in action in this DiscountJuicers.com video. The separate bowl attachment fits onto the base, using the auger to pulverize the food and push it through a large chute without a screen.

Traditionally, this is the most common type of juicer. These typically utilize a fast-spinning metal blade that spins against a mesh filter, separating juice from flesh via centrifugal force. The juice and pulp are then separated into different containers. The problem with centrifugal juicers is that the fast-spinning metal blade generates heat, which destroys some of the enzymes in the fruits and vegetables you're juicing. The heat also oxidizes those nutrients, rendering less nutritious juice than a cold-press juicer.


We used three recipes to test how well each juicer handled hard produce (apples, carrots, etc.), soft produce (salad greens, fresh herbs, etc.) and almonds. In our test kitchen, we measured the results precisely, noted the amount of juice and pulp that emerged, and scored each juicer on performance. We also measured the noise in decibels, monitored spills or splatters, timed assembly and cleanup efforts, and noted such specifications as juicer dimensions and electrical cord length.
The gist: For those looking to get the most out of their leafy greens, the Lexen GP27 is the way to *manually* do just that. This juicer is the solution for those that don't want to lay out hundreds for an expensive masticating juicer, but also don't want to settle for a cheap, crummy manual model. As the folks at The Healthy Juicer say, this thing was designed to be "simple, mobile, versatile, and easy to clean." Simple is right. To use, just put a put a juice cup under the spout, place your greens into the chute, and start churning.  Cleaning this thing is a breeze, since all you have to do is unscrew the parts, rinse them off in the sink, and boom—you're done. Thanks to its high juice-yield and cold-press technology, you can rest assured your greens will be nutrient-packed to the max. 
It does a superior, although not perfect, job with hard produce and zips through soft produce easily. It leaves some pulp that doesn't have all the nutritious fluid extracted from it but not enough to be a problem. On the downside, we had to do quite a bit of chopping ahead of time so that the pieces of fruit and vegetables would fit through the food chute. This juicer is easy to care for. It takes only a little time to assemble and clean, and various parts are dishwasher-safe. The machine also comes with a cleaning brush, as well as a froth separator and a tall pitcher. This is a big machine, and it is noisy but at a decibel level comparable with other good-quality juicers. You can get help with the juicer over email, but there is no phone number for customer support.

The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
This means you can make like a gallon of juice in one go without growing your arm muscles. Changing of the juice collector is a breeze also, because the spout is designed so that it can be lifted up during changing to prevent dripping. No rocket science here, but this little detail in design deserves a shout out – I’m sure the idea comes from someone who does make their own orange juice.
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.

Whereas the Omega J8004 is a commercial-quality machine, the Omega NC800 is designed for household use. When it came to green juice, the output was almost identical. The carrot juice was a different story, though. The NC800 yielded only 12.3 ounces. John Kohler at DiscountJuicers.com said that this machine put out 15 percent more juice than its predecessor, but we found that it actually put out 25 percent less carrot juice than the J8004. The nice feature of this juicer is that it boasts a larger feed tube than its predecessor, which makes prep a little easier.

It's entirely possible that you're curious about buying a juicer. In case you haven't heard, juicing is trending. We're not talking about the Barry Bonds type of juicing, but the Jack LaLanne type. Recent claims have promised that drinking fresh-pressed juices can help you lose weight, boost immunity, prevent cancer and cleanse your system. Whether that's entirely true remains to be seen, but it can't hurt, right?
In more expensive juicers, such as the Super Angel Juicer, higher quality materials such as surgical-grade stainless steel are used. These types of masticating juicers also feature slightly different augers, that are closer in appearance to a car’s transmission. These twin gear systems are interlocked and are much more efficient in grinding up fruits and vegetables. However, the price tags on these juicers are considerably higher as well.
Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004. 
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