This is also a relatively powerful machine that doesn't require you to make a ton of cuts to your produce. We dropped two halves of a red delicious apple down the chute, and the machine easily juiced it. When it came time for us to test the hard produce, we were able to drop full beets into the tube and they juiced with little to no pressing needed on the food pusher. Some of the juicers sprayed juice, froth or pulp out their backside, getting the counter and walls dirty. This juicer had no difficulty maintaining the waste and was easy to clean.

Accessories include a 2-liter pulp container that makes it easy to discard unwanted pulp and a 1-quart juice pitcher for collecting juice to serve at the breakfast table or to store in the refrigerator for later. The unit's removable parts clean up easily by hand or in the dishwasher, and a cleaning brush comes included. Housed in die cast and stainless steel, the juice extractor measures approximately 15-2/5 by 11-4/5 by 19 inches.
Centrifugal: This is the most common type of juicer sold at kitchen stores and big box retailers. It’s the most affordable. Once you feed in the vegetables or fruit, it shreds and spins very fast so that the pulp and bits of fruit and vegetables are caught by a strainer or filter and the juice spins out. Centrifugal juicers can be loud. And, because they are fast, they heat up, which can affect the nutritional value of the juice.
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In our tests, this juicer created the least amount of froth of any machine we tested, which means you get fewer bubbles and waste and more juice. Our food-prep time was minimal. This juicer has a 3-inch-wide food chute, so you don't have to spend a lot of time chopping fruits or veggies to fit. However, you need to spend some time cleaning this juicer, since it comes with nine separate parts. Still, this process is made somewhat easier by the included cleaning brush. Plus, some parts are dishwasher-safe. This is a big machine, so you probably want to find a spot on a kitchen counter to store it for daily use. It comes with a tall pitcher, a froth separator and a nonslip base so it stays in place during operation. This is a noisy juicer but no more so than any other – they're all fairly loud.


These are also called cold-press or auger-style juicers. These devices have an auger that grinds the produce, breaking down cell walls and releasing the juice, which is then squeezed through a steel screen. Masticating juicers take longer than extractors to produce your cup of juice, but yield more juice and leave more of the nutrients intact. If you like green juices with plenty of leafy, tough greens like kale, you’ll be happiest with this type of juicer. Many can also be used to make nut milk. You’ll pay quite a bit more for a cold-press juicer, however.
After looking and thinking a while I triggered to get this juicer. This juicer is really useful for my mom and dad who drink mostly fruits and veggies juice. I'm really happy I decided to try out this juicer. Everyone in house using it for their own use. It is easy to use and wash. If you want less cleaning then just put a small plastic bag in the trash bin of the juicer for easier cleaning. I have washed the parts of the juicer quickly after using it so the stuff doesn't dry. It is pretty quiet. Overall this juicer has given me wonderful results and hopefully will for a long time!
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If you are serious about juicing, then you’ll likely be adding all sorts of fruits and vegetables—maybe even nuts—to whatever juicer you purchase. It is important to have as much control as possible to accommodate different types of juicer recipes you may try, and speed is an important factor. Juicers with adjustable speeds allow for greater control over the consistency of your juicing. If you know that you are only going to be juicing a handful of different foods, this may be a feature you would be fine in overlooking.

The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
Dietitian and nutrition writer Sharon Palmer told us that a juicer “should be easy to use, take apart, clean, and store.” Most of the juicers took about 10 minutes to assemble. The $300 Breville and the $400 Hurom both came mostly assembled, but the Tribest ($250) didn’t — and we found its instructions confusing and difficult to follow. KitchenAid’s $300 juicer attachment was hands-down the worst, requiring a full 20 minutes to assemble and almost causing injury thanks to its exposed blade.
For its smart design and features, as well as the brand moniker, the Breville 800CPXL is no doubt a desirable item to have on the countertop in an orange juice loving family’s kitchen, or in a small juice bar. It actually makes sense to have one along with a centrifuge or masticator, because when you only need citrus juice, cleanup is so much easier on the 800CPXL.
A "smoking motor" is usually caused from binding between the cutting unit clutch and the cutting assembly which connects to the motor. Unplug the blender and allow to cool. Once the blender is cool, check the cutting assembly (see the Use and Care instructions for your model for a parts diagram) to see if the blades "spin freely." Be careful, the blades are sharp. If the blades do not spin freely, the cutting unit needs to be replaced. Once the blender base (without container) is cool, plug it in and turn it on to see if it works properly. (If the unit was not turned off when the cutting unit locked, the motor could be damaged.)
There are several types of juicers to choose from (more on those in How we picked), and even within the same type, different machines don’t always handle soft fruits, hard roots, and leafy greens equally well. Ultimately, we found single-auger slow juicers to be the best all around, and our picks reflect that. But which one you choose may depend on what type of juice you want to make. Our top pick was the best all around, but our runner-up makes smoother green juice, and our budget pick is best for juicing hard roots and fruits like carrots and apples. 

I researched and compared several mid priced juicers to the most expensive I could find. $150 was the most I wanted to spend because I recently bought a Vita-Mix blender ($500+). I finally decided on the Breville Juice Fountain Plus JE 95XL (850 watts). But Bed, Bath and Beyond, failed to have it it stock. I made it out there without calling to see if they had it in stock and again, they did not. Not wanting to leave empty handed, I started looking at some of the other juicers they had. That's when I came across the Cuisinart CJE-1000.

I researched and compared several mid priced juicers to the most expensive I could find. $150 was the most I wanted to spend because I recently bought a Vita-Mix blender ($500+). I finally decided on the Breville Juice Fountain Plus JE 95XL (850 watts). But Bed, Bath and Beyond, failed to have it it stock. I made it out there without calling to see if they had it in stock and again, they did not. Not wanting to leave empty handed, I started looking at some of the other juicers they had. That's when I came across the Cuisinart CJE-1000.
If you are a newbie at juicing, you may be hesitant to spend on the pricier model. However, it’s not only the price of the juicer that you should consider but the cost of the whole juicing process over time. To illustrate, the cheaper centrifugal juicers are not as efficient as the masticating or triturating ones such that there are lower juice yield and much wastage of produce.

Citrus juicers are an entirely different breed type of juicers. These juicers are designed specifically for the juicing of citrus fruits such as lemons, limes, oranges, and grapefruits. These juicers are often much less expensive than masticating or centrifugal juicers but are also much less versatile. Many citrus juicers are manual press juicers, where a lever-type arm is clamped down on top of a half of a citrus fruit, which is first positioned on a sharp pointed like form. The press applies pressure on the fruit, which is squeezed down onto the sharp, cone-line device. This cone-like device presses into the center of the fruit, driving the innards outwards.
Be prepared to clean your juicer after every use. Bacteria love to feast on unpasteurized juices, so it’s important to clean your juicer every time you use it. And the sooner the better — the drier it gets, the harder pulp is to remove. During testing, we found that the strainer baskets and pulp spouts tended to need the most attention. So think about how often you’ll use your machine, what kind of fruits and vegetables you’ll be juicing (some leave more behind in your juicer than others), and how much time you’ll have to clean your machine.
While juicers like the Omega and the Tribest only filled one-half to two-thirds of a standard 8-ounce drinking glass, the Hurom gave us nearly a full glass. It’s a cold-press juicer, meaning it works a little slower, but is likely to squeeze more from your fruits and veg. You can run the Hurom with one of two filters — “low pulp” and “high pulp” — but our taste-testers reported the low-pulp option was still pretty pulpy. If you’re not a fan of all that fiber, we’d suggest the Breville, below.

If you’re a serious juicer who needs to cut down on prep time but doesn’t want to cut down on the quality of your juice, the SKG New Generation Wide Chute Juicer might be your perfect match. The feed tube is 3 inches wide which means that you don’t have to always chop up your produce for juicing. The low 60rpm speed ensures you get a high juice yield, minimum amount of pulp, no heat build up, and no foaming.


Are you looking for a quick daily juice to take on your commute or something packed with all kinds of unusual ingredients to enjoy on a luxurious weekend morning? To make the most out of your juicer, get a head start by researching recipes involving your favorite ingredients. There are lots of online guides for beginners. The last thing you want to do is purchase a juicer and have it gather dust because you got sick of straight carrot juice.

The Omega VSJ843 is one of the slowest and quietest machines we’ve tested, and it produces juices without much foam. The VSJ843 produced almost as much green juice as our top pick, the high-yielding Tribest. So if you’re a devoted green juicer, you might prefer this Omega to our pick. However, for most people, its higher price, slightly lower yields on carrot-apple juice, and lack of versatility make it a second choice to our top pick.
In our tests, the Tribest Slowstar consistently outperformed its competitors, delivering high yields of delicious juices from a variety of fruits and vegetables with minimal effort. Compared with other juicers we tested, the Slowstar is quieter and less likely to jam, and it generates less foam. With an impressive 10-year warranty on the motor and parts, we think it’s a worthwhile investment for people who juice regularly.
In our tests, the Hamilton Beach juicer produced lots of juice for each of our three test recipes. It handled hard and soft produce well, though it could have processed the leafy greens slightly better. Even so, it produced a high juice yield compared to other products after straining away the froth. This juicer does leave a lot of pulp in your juice, which is great if you’re looking to up your fiber intake. Unlike some others, the Hamilton Beach doesn’t come with a pitcher to collect your juice. Its nozzle also points directly down, so find the right container to catch your juice and prevent spills.
"ABSOLUTELY LOVE IT!!!!!!!! I have had A LOT of juicers over the years and this one blows them all away! it is super fast and pulp is super dry. you get way more than twice the juice! I juiced a lot of veg, 2 pitchers (that it comes with about 4 cups each) and the pulp container was not even half full, yet there was no pulp in the juice! I've even had the slow masticating juicers, this is better. easy to put together, take apart and clean!!!!! i love it in every way. and before you believe that juice from slow juicers is better for you, look it up, thats what i did, and its not as long as its done fast with a good juicer! I truly love this juicer in every way! I will never go back to the lower end ones (that cost about the same anyway, oh brother!) or the expensive slow hard to use and clean ones! Wish i had this in the beginning of my juicing ventures 20 years ago!!!!!!!!!!!"
Born and raised in Paris, the land of unapologetic butter, Francois has spent the last 20 years shaping the American culinary world behind the scenes. He was a buyer at Williams-Sonoma, built the Food Network online store, managed product assortments for Rachael Ray's site, started two meal delivery businesses and runs a successful baking blog. When he's not baking a cake or eating his way through Europe, Francois enjoys sharing cooking skills with cooks of all levels. Rules he lives by: "Use real butter" and "Nothing beats a sharp knife."
The high RPM associated with centrifugal juicers also generates a lot of foam which drives more oxygen bubbles into the juice, resulting in the lower shelf life of the juice. Juice extracted by centrifugal juicers spoil rather quickly due to the oxygen-laden foam and must be consumed immediately. With this, you cannot hope to make a bulk of juice and store for later.
The high RPM associated with centrifugal juicers also generates a lot of foam which drives more oxygen bubbles into the juice, resulting in the lower shelf life of the juice. Juice extracted by centrifugal juicers spoil rather quickly due to the oxygen-laden foam and must be consumed immediately. With this, you cannot hope to make a bulk of juice and store for later.
When it comes to features, the Omega J8006 Masticating Juicer is in a different league — starting with the way it actually produces juice. According to the manufacturer, rapidly spinning blades damage valuable oxidants and enzymes. The powerful, slow-speed auger in the Omega prevents this. It also delivers considerably more force, so fruit and vegetables are squeezed once as they enter the machine, and then the pulp is squeezed a second time – which maximizes goodness and minimizes waste.
The Tribest Slowstar, a vertical single-auger, slow-press juicer, is the most versatile juicer we’ve found, efficiently handling thick greens, fruits, and root vegetables. In our tests, it yielded the highest amount of green juice and nearly the highest amount of hard-vegetable juice with low effort, experienced no motor jams, and generated minimal foam. It also has a generous feed-tube opening, which makes for quicker prep and easier juicing. This quiet machine is backed with a 10-year warranty that covers the motor and parts, one of the better guarantees among the juicers we tested.

Low foam production: The foam that accumulates on top of your juice is a good indicator of how much air has been whipped into your juice by the machine, and more air exposure equals more oxidation. Oxidation is a controversial topic. As Harold McGee explains in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, “Because juicing mixes together the contents of living cells, including active enzymes and various reactive and oxygen-sensitive substances, fresh juices are unstable and change rapidly.” So the prevailing theory among juicers is that if less oxygen is whipped into a juice, the valuable nutrients and enzymes remain more intact. But as Kohler told us, there’s not much peer-reviewed research on how or if oxidation affects the nutrient contents of your juice. “It’s all manufacturers’ data for the most part,” he said, “which I take with a grain of salt.” That said, we still prioritized machines that produced less foam, because at the very least, oxidation can cause your green juice to turn brown, and may lead to some muddy, off flavors.
While all juicers require scrubbing, we wanted to find the models that were as simple to clean as possible, free of nooks and crannies where pulp could collect. Despite a reputation that cold-press models will have you digging pulp out of their components for hours, our testing found that they were only slightly more difficult to clean than the centrifugal juicers.
An efficient design allows the Slowstar to crank out a high volume of juice within a small footprint of 6½ by 8 inches. The feed-tube opening is a relatively wide 2½ by 1½ inches—wider than the 1½-inch chute on the Omega J8004—which helps reduce the amount of vegetable prep you’ll have to do beforehand. The solid waste collects cleanly in a waste container that’s included. The Slowstar has a reverse button in the back in case you need to dislodge stuck vegetable matter, but I never needed to use it.
Comprehensive warranty: A good warranty can also add value to an expensive juicer. Our picks have 10- and 15-year warranties (the longest we’ve found) on both parts and motors, whereas some companies will cover only a motor. Although most of the parts on a slow juicer don’t wear that much, juicing screens can occasionally break, so warranty coverage for them is important. A long warranty on the motor isn’t a bad thing, but juicer motors seem to be pretty sturdy and not as susceptible to breakage as individual parts.
When it comes to super convenient press juicer, you’re looking for something that is easy to use, juices fast, and can be tucked away without any effort. Most importantly, it needs to be an easy to clean juicer, so you can juice in a hurry. These are all features that you’ll find in this juicer, and maybe that’s why its been consistently rated as one of the top rated press juicers in 2013 and 2014

I like this juicer, but I often find it leaves more residue than I would like. So I redo it and sometimes that helps. I think if there was less space for the residue to fling about, more of it might be juiced. Some of that I am sure is me, as I am new to all this. I don't find it as easy to clean as I would like, but I am lazy. It is doing wonders for the compost pile. And hopefully, me.
Single-auger juicers: An auger is like a big, threaded screw that pulls fruit or vegetables into the juicing chamber and presses the juice out. The auger can turn anywhere from 43 to 80 rpm, resulting in slowly produced, low-foam, low-temperature, high-volume, and nutrient-dense juice. Single-auger juicers can be oriented vertically or horizontally and are very versatile, good for greens and hard roots. Although vertical and horizontal juicers work on the same principle, vertical juicers have a smaller footprint and slightly larger yield. But vertical models are generally in the $300 to $400 range, so they’re not for the occasional juice drinker. They’re best suited for those who include fresh green juice as part of a daily routine and are concerned about low oxidation and maximum yield. And certain models, like our pick, have food-mincing and frozen-fruit-sorbet-making capabilities. All of our picks are single-auger juicers: the Tribest Slowstar and Omega VSJ843 are examples of vertical single-auger juicers, and the Omega J8004 is a horizontal single-auger juicer.

However, considering that it’s the compensation for healthier, more nutritious juices, the 2 minute wait is not exactly a deal breaker. Plus, since the juice is cold-pressed and is exposed to very minimal oxidation, it can be stored up to 72 hours in the fridge. That means you can actually save more time than using a fast juicer, since the juices made with fast machines typically degrade within a couple hours after they’re made.
Shopping for a juicer can be a daunting task, as there are quite a few juicers out there to choose from. Stores such as Macy’s, Target, Wal-Mart, and even Bed Bath & Beyond offer ‘affordable’ type juicers that are meant more as a means of meeting a demand for juicers than in meeting the demands of juicers. Simply put, if you’re buying a juicer in a store, unless you’ve done your research, you’re likely getting a sub-par product. Certainly, there are exceptions to the rules, and many retailers have realized consumers are beginning to care as much about quality as price again. To get a better idea of what type of juicer may be best-suited for your needs, you’ll find a brief overview of the different juicer types below.
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