Assembling this machine is relatively straightforward, as most of the parts go in a logical location and are easy to click in and out of place. This machine does have an extra piece beneath the filter bowl that we have not seen on any other machine – a black ring, which Cuisinart's manual refers to as the "foam management filter disk." Considering that this machine produces little froth, we can assume this part does its job well. Some grater baskets are difficult to insert or remove, but this one goes on and off easily while still feeling secure.
Since there are nine parts that need to be disassembled and cleaned after each juicing session, it can take a little longer to hand wash this juicer. While Cuisinart states that these parts can be washed on the top rack of a dishwasher, they recommend hand washing to prevent warping. It can be really difficult cleaning the mesh cylinder that surrounds the grater, but fortunately this juicer comes with a cleaning brush, which works effectively to unplug those holes fast. If you’d prefer fewer parts to take apart and wash might want to look at the Kuvings Centrifugal Juicer NJ-9500UB, which works well and has only five parts to clean.
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With four smart fins on its stainless steel juicing cone, the 800CPXL can accommodate most types of citrus: from things as small as limes to larger fruits like grapefruits, and even some non-citrus like pomegranates. There’ll be a learning curve on how to place some of the awkwardly asymmetrical fruits onto the top of the cone so that they come out perfectly and  evenly juiced, but you will most definitely get the hang of it after the 15th orange.

The juicer also has a big enough mouth for larger pieces of fruit, and in many cases, you'll be able to fit an entire fruit or vegetable in there without having to cut it up at all. That cuts down on prep time and ensures you won't have to dirty up knives and cutting boards to make some juice. The motor inside the juicer is 850-watt, and the device comes with a liter jug, a froth separator, and a cleaning brush.
If you're looking to get into the home-juicing game — good for you! You're doing something great for your health and will also probably save a ton of money on store-bought juices that can cost up to $12 per 12 oz. bottle. However, when it comes to making your own juices, the kind of juicer you use can really make or break your experience. Don't worry, we're here to help. To start, we compiled a list of the top-rated juicers according to Amazon reviews. 

"Love it, love it, love it. Why'd I wait so long??? I love everything about this juicer (except maybe the extra time it takes to make all that juice from the leafy greens, but you know what, it's time well spent because it's SO relaxing watching healthy juice being created as you spin the lever). I'm ditching my centrifugal juicer forever. I set up the base of this unit on my counter permanently which means about a 1 minute set up time (and probably 2-3 minutes to take apart and rinse off). Unlike the bigger, heavier juicers, these smaller pieces are so easy to wash and manage and store, light and small it all fits in a drawer and doesn't take up half of my cabinet space. And it juices most everything. I make citrus juice, cucumber/celerey juice, etc. I get about 1 cup of spinach juice from those 1lb. containers, than I freeze the spinach fiber in tablespoon sizes and throw in my smoothies (especially good with bananas) or in my soups/stocks/eggs. As for the turning of the lever, you will turn it for a while, more than you'd like to in this fast paced society, but it is effortless and like I said, fun to watch the juice produce through the clear plastic cylinder. Time passes quickly. I imagine too that the more I do this the quicker I'll become. It also pieces together with such ease and safety (so great for kids!!!)..."
If juicing leafy greens is an emphasis for you or you want a machine that handles other kitchen prep the Omega J8006 is your best choice. This classic cold press masticating juicer has been a best seller for years and produced the highest volume of kale juice of all the juicers we tested. It works quietly at slow speeds (only 80 RPM) to extract juice from all kinds of produce. Its dual-stage juicing system mimics how humans chew–the crush and press process produces drier pulp and high juice yield. We did have to spend more time cutting fruits and vegetables up to fit them into the small feed tube and occasionally had to stop juicing and use the “reverse” feature to handle clogs. It also produced slightly less juice from hard fruits and vegetables and as a horizontal model has a bigger countertop footprint. However, it offers additional functions such as pureeing nuts into nut butters, grinding spices and coffee, making pasta, and baby food with an extremely generous 15 year warranty.
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We tested the same three recipes in each juicer to see how well each machine performed with various types of fruits and vegetables: soft produce, leafy greens and hard foods. The Cuisinart Juice Extractor yielded a high percentage of juice for each recipe. What's more, most of the juice extracted had little to no froth, so it was easier to drink straight from the machine. Most juicers struggle when it comes to juicing leafy greens and nuts, but this machine handled both relatively well. Most of the other machines were unable to effectively process almonds, but this juicer was able to create a decent amount of almond milk, with the almonds finely shredded and collected in the pulp container.
In our tests, this juicer created the least amount of froth of any machine we tested, which means you get fewer bubbles and waste and more juice. Our food-prep time was minimal. This juicer has a 3-inch-wide food chute, so you don't have to spend a lot of time chopping fruits or veggies to fit. However, you need to spend some time cleaning this juicer, since it comes with nine separate parts. Still, this process is made somewhat easier by the included cleaning brush. Plus, some parts are dishwasher-safe. This is a big machine, so you probably want to find a spot on a kitchen counter to store it for daily use. It comes with a tall pitcher, a froth separator and a nonslip base so it stays in place during operation. This is a noisy juicer but no more so than any other – they're all fairly loud.

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We were pleasantly surprised at how well the Hamilton Beach stacked up in taste testing, even against pricier cold-press models such as the KitchenAid (which featured sizeable chunks of celery in its juice. Many testers praised the smoothness of the Hamilton’s juice, noting that the Black & Decker and Oster were both grittier. You’ll get less juice and more foam than a top-performer like the Hurom, but the Hamilton Beach offers tasty results and a respectable performance for a much smaller price tag.
There are other features which give you convenience. A juicer that has a large feeding tube, for instance, means you can put in large chunks, enabling you to skip the tedious chore of chopping your produce into small pieces. A large disposal spout is also a good feature as large spouts do not easily get clogged up and have the added advantage of producing a higher volume of juice.

Dietitian and nutrition writer Sharon Palmer told us that a juicer “should be easy to use, take apart, clean, and store.” Most of the juicers took about 10 minutes to assemble. The $300 Breville and the $400 Hurom both came mostly assembled, but the Tribest ($250) didn’t — and we found its instructions confusing and difficult to follow. KitchenAid’s $300 juicer attachment was hands-down the worst, requiring a full 20 minutes to assemble and almost causing injury thanks to its exposed blade.
The major disadvantages of this type of machine are the noise, heat, and oxidation resulted from their great speed. This oxidation can cause a loss in nutrients in the juice, thus reducing the juice quality and fridge life. Besides, while they’re good for thick, hard, crunchy fruits and veggies, these juicers are much less efficient in handling leafy greens.
The flavor of the Tribest juice was as fresh and bright as any I’ve had at boutique juice bars, with a nice balance between the kale and the grapes. The hue was a vibrant green, like Technicolor in a glass. The foam was minimal, too, measuring half an inch above the top of the surface of the juice; lesser juicers had up to four inches of foam at the top. The Tribest also handled 21 ounces of hard and fibrous vegetables and fruits like a champ. In our 2015 testing, the carrot-apple-celery-ginger juice yield was 15.3 ounces, the second-best result of all the models tested.
Yes, the Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fast and popular. But this centrifugal juicer paled in comparison with the slow juicers we tested. The yields were low and it was the least effective at juicing greens. In my one-bedroom apartment, you can’t hear the television in the living room when a Breville Juice Fountain Plus is fired up in the kitchen. It also has only a one-year warranty.
Noise level: The machinery inside of a juicer can be a little noisy at times, and that's problematic if you're planning on juicing early in the morning before work. You wouldn't, after all, want to wake up the rest of the family while juicing. In general, high-speed juicers with a centrifugal design are the noisiest, while masticating juicers are quieter.
In our tests, this juicer created the least amount of froth of any machine we tested, which means you get fewer bubbles and waste and more juice. Our food-prep time was minimal. This juicer has a 3-inch-wide food chute, so you don't have to spend a lot of time chopping fruits or veggies to fit. However, you need to spend some time cleaning this juicer, since it comes with nine separate parts. Still, this process is made somewhat easier by the included cleaning brush. Plus, some parts are dishwasher-safe. This is a big machine, so you probably want to find a spot on a kitchen counter to store it for daily use. It comes with a tall pitcher, a froth separator and a nonslip base so it stays in place during operation. This is a noisy juicer but no more so than any other – they're all fairly loud.

Centrifugal juicers are also not as efficient as masticating juicers in terms of generating yield. The pulp that comes out of centrifugal juicers is still relatively wet which means that less of the juice is extracted. You cannot count on centrifugal juicers to extract high yields of juice from high-fiber leafy greens like wheat-grass, spinach, and lettuce.
Twin-gear juicers: For greens like kale, spinach, and wheatgrass, a twin-gear juicer extracts the most juice. Twin-gear juicers are also the most expensive models, often costing over $500. As the name suggests, two gears work together to crush the cell walls of the vegetable and extract the juice. They’re best for greens and other tough fibrous vegetables and not great for fruit.
These are the cheapest citrus juicers available that can create a lot of mess making a cup of orange juice. It also has a cone-shaped head on which you have to squeeze the half-cut fruit in order to juice it. The pulp and seeds are collected on the top of the strainer and the juice gets collected in the cup. The pulp and the seeds are also mixed with the juice if the size of the holes on the strainer is wide.

Warranty: No matter what kind of juicer you're getting, you want it to last. You should always get small appliances with some level of warranty, but normally the longer the warranty, the better. Not only does it show that a company is confident in its product, but it also means that if something does break, you won't have to shell out any extra cash. 
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