Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.
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Breville’s top of the line commercial-grade centrifugal juicer doesn’t disappoint. Boasting a super strong and fast 1000-watt motor with 2 speed controls this machine plows through piles of fruits and vegetables in a flash and gets highly rated juicer reviews. The variable speed options give you more control–Breville recommends using the high speed setting (13,000 RPM) for hard fruits and vegetables and low setting (6,500 RPM) for softer fruits and vegetables. While it does make noise equivalent to a blender, it works so quickly you won’t have to listen long. A 3” feed tube lets you juice whole fruits and vegetables with significantly less prep time. This juicer is built to last with titanium reinforced cutting blades that stay sharp longer and made entirely of die-cast materials but be aware that it only has a 1 year warranty. Breville does sell replacement parts on their website. We love the included 1-liter juice jug with built in froth separator and cover. This juicer is perfect for juicing in bulk–it has a large capacity external pulp container so you can juice piles of fruits and vegetables with no breaks. It didn’t extract as much juice out of kale as other models we tried did; but unless your juicing emphasis is on leafy greens this juicer is perfect for high volume juicing.
Equipped with a 1000-watt powerful motor, this easy-to-use juice extractor makes it exceptionally convenient to enjoy fresh, healthy fruit and vegetable juice from the comfort of home. The unit's large 3-inch feeding chute can accommodate whole apples, pears, and other large-size fruits and vegetables (extra-large items may need to be cut into smaller pieces first).
Sifting through the endless numbers of juicers can be tough, and without a concise frame of reference, you’ll likely drift aimlessly. This guide is meant to serve as a clearly-outlined reference for those looking to compare the best juicers on the market. Make no mistake, these juicers aren’t the cheapest juicers available, but they are without doubt among the best. For those already familiar with the types of juicers, the benefits of juicing, and all the other information that will be covered in this article, you can find a quick reference table below:

We invested 96 hours in testing and evaluating juicers, measuring the amount of juice versus pulp each produced, the amount of froth created, and how much prep work was needed to get fruits and vegetables to fit through the food chute. In some cases, we had to spend quite a bit of time chopping hard produce into small- or medium-sized pieces, while other juicers had chutes so big we could simply cut an average apple, orange or beet into quarters. We also evaluated how much pressure we needed to exert to push fruits and vegetables through the juicer.
Kuvings released the C7000 in 2017. Kohler said this model has improved features compared with the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer (B6000), which didn’t impress us in testing. From watching a comparison review of the C7000 and the Whole Slow Juicer, we see that the C7000 has a new funnel for easily feeding produce, doesn’t produce as much pulp, and has a more recessed auger for easier cleaning compared with its predecessor. But the C7000 still spins faster than our pick at 60 rpm, and is more expensive at the time of writing. And although Kuvings juicers boast a 3-inch feed tube that, in theory, can accept whole fruit, most apples in the store are much bigger than three inches in diameter, so that’s a wash. When we tested the Whole Slow Juicer, it didn’t hold a candle to the juice quality from Tribest or Omega machines. The Kuvings Silent Juicer was also an underperformer, giving us over an ounce less of green juice than the Slowstar. The resulting juice was also unpleasantly pulpy.
Masticating juice extractors are also known as slow juicers because of their working mechanism that uses a slow rotating auger to crush the fruits against a stainless steel mesh at only 80-100 RPM. They do not shred or cut the fruits with blades like a centrifugal juicer, which makes them excellent for leafy greens as they get the best nutrients out of them at an extremely slow speed.

The best juicers extract as much liquid as possible from fruits and vegetables, leaving behind very little pulp. Machines that leave large amounts of very moist pulp just aren’t doing their job. The same is true for froth. Every juicer makes some froth, but you don't want inches of bubbles – you want a machine that gives you the most juice for your money.

Through this process of leveraged force, the bulk of the juice is forced from the fruit and is then often passed through a filter into a juice collection chamber. Many electric juicers utilize a spinning point to increase the efficiency of juice production, which is preferred by many. Citrus juicers are great if you are making fresh lemonades, orange juices, or recipes which call for large amounts of fresh citrus juices. Producing juice from a single citrus fruit really isn’t much of a chore, but if you have the need to juice large amounts of citrus fruits, these juicers can help you save tons of time!


Masticating juicers are also very popular because they are able to handle more types of foods. For instance, nuts and frozen berries can be handles by most masticating juicers. If you like to juice green leafy vegetables or wheat grass, masticating juicers are likely to be the best option for you. These juicers are also referred to as slow juicers, meaning that many people regard them as producing juice at a slower rate. In all reality, masticating juicers produce juice just about as quickly as any other juicers, but their internal parts move more slowly. Slower moving parts usually mean less chance of breaking, and wider margins of error when trying difficult foods.
We were able to wipe down and rinse off the entire machine in about 15 minutes. It comes with two brushes: a fluffier, softer brush for large areas, and a hard-bristled double-ended brush for tackling the mesh of the strainer basket. Cleaning the pulp container was especially straightforward since the Hurom’s pulp was so dry and easy to empty out. The pulp of the centrifugal juicers, by contrast, was so wet that it tended to stick in nooks and crannies.
Masticating juicers rely on direct mechanical force to chop and squeeze juice from fruits and vegetables. This method typically involves less power and lower temperatures and is regarded as the best juicing method by many. Masticating juicers are able to use less-powerful motors than other types of juicers because of the way they are designed. Less powerful motors mean less heat being put off. Many people believe that this reduction in heat helps to preserve the natural enzymes found in juice.
Celery will juice just fine, but for greens I use one of those slow juicers, the vertical version. The celery, raspberry, strawberry and things like kiwi come out better on slow juicers. It appears that “one size fits all” idea is only good for T-shirts, so considering one can get slow masticating juicers for much less then they used to cost there is no reason not to have one as well, so you can make nectar out of spinach and celery – it does taste weird but it is quite nutrition.
The juice extractor on the other hand is a device used to obtain juice from citrus fruits and vegetables where the pulp, seeds, and the skin is separated, for you to get only pure juice of the fruit or vegetable. It has blades to cut pieces of fruits that rotate or spin at a high speed to separate seeds and skin from the juice that is collected in a container.
Features: The Omega J8006 Nutrition Center is a masticating style juicer. Sometimes referred to as a low speed juicer, the Nutrition Center processes at 80rpm, whereas most other juicers process at a speed of 1,650 to 15,000rpm. The low speed protects and maintains healthy enzymes, prevents oxidation and allows juice to be stored up to 72 hours without degradation. The GE Ultem Auger is 8x stronger than most other plastics and the powerful gear reduction is equivalent to a 2HP Motor. The dual stage juice processing system extracts the maximum amount of juice from fruits, vegetables, leafy greens, even wheatgrass! You can also use the nutrition center to turn nuts into nut butters (an all-natural peanut butter), make baby food from natural, fresh ingredients, whip up soy milk, extrude pasta, grind coffee and spices, and mince herbs and garli...
The Omega VRT400HDS is a masticating juicer—preferred by many for releasing more enzyme rich juices—but makes use of a vertical design to allow a more streamlined juicing experience. This vertical design allows for more efficient pressure to be applied, as well as being a more compact design. This juicer is great if you’re serious about juicing, and have a diet that requires high-volumes of fresh-squeezed juice.
Not sure what to do with the leftover pulp? The leftover pulp is mostly fiber and cellulose, which like the juice, contains necessary vital nutrients for the daily diet. Any leftover pulp can be used in a variety of recipes, frothy drinks, casseroles or soups, as well as for garden composting. Thirsty for something other than juice? The HealthSmart® Juice Extractor can help children, teens and adults get their daily vitamin intake with the option of making soy, almond or rice milk. To start, soak one cup of soybeans, almonds or rice in four cups of water for 24 to 48 hours in the refrigerator, and then slowly pour one cup into the food chute. The liquid extracted from the soaked mixture is the "milk." For enhanced milk flavor, consider adding vanilla or honey.
All plastic parts (except for the motor base) remove for easy cleanup in the dishwasher. To clean the cutter/strainer, run water over the strainer basket and brush off excess fiber buildup or pulp. The pulp bin container can be emptied by turning the extractor OFF and removing it from the unit. For easy cleanup, place a plastic grocery bag in the pulp bin container to collect the pulp and once juicing is complete, simply discard.
Features: It’s never been easier to create fresh, nutritious fruit and vegetable juices at home. The Cuisinart® Juice Extractor features a 3" feed tube that easily handles whole fruits and vegetables. The adjustable flow spout eliminates drips and spills for clean countertops, and the 5-speed control dial is easy to operate. The specially designed filter basket reduces foam, and the unit is so quiet, you won’t wake the family while you’re making juice for breakfast! Features Die-cast and stainless steel housing Exclusive easy unlock and lift system Exclusive foam management filter disk Exclusive anti-drip adjustable flow spout Quiet operation Large 3 inch feed tube for whole fruits and vegetables 5-speed dial control with blue LED light ring 2-liter pulp container 1-liter juice pitcher Easily juices hard and soft produce All...
When it comes to super convenient press juicer, you’re looking for something that is easy to use, juices fast, and can be tucked away without any effort. Most importantly, it needs to be an easy to clean juicer, so you can juice in a hurry. These are all features that you’ll find in this juicer, and maybe that’s why its been consistently rated as one of the top rated press juicers in 2013 and 2014
The Hamilton Beach’s 3-inch chute was a breeze by comparison: We were able to drop in large apple halves and entire celery stalks without a problem. Most budget competitors we tested had an extremely narrow feed chute that required us to chop our apples into sixteenths to get them to fit — a process we’re reluctant to commit to for our daily juice.
Of course, not everyone can consume a plate of fruits and vegetables. Drinking it may be easier. And this is where juicers come in. With the right juicer, you’ll easily be able to add all the nutrients you’ve been missing out on with your former diet. But with the market currently overflowing with options, how do you find the best one for you? Well, we’re here to help! Check out our picks of the best juicers this 2018.
It is very good unit for juicing carrots, apples and similar harder veggies. We used it today (03/15/2016) for large amount of carrot juice (over one gallon, with breaks every liter and to empty pulp container) and it came out with minimum foam, good consistency and reasonably dry pulp. Position of the chute is good, no leaks, no splatter, no mess, regardless it is 1000 watts on highest speed. Unit’s cutting basket has very minimal vibrations which disappear more of less at normal speed and there is floating mechanism added to electric motor that works out the vibrations quite nicely. Well, after all it is a centrifugal juicer not a satellite guiding system, therefore little thing like this is expected and not bothersome. Locking mechanism on this juicer is very well designed, and base is actually made from magnesium like casting, which makes it bottom heavy and quite sturdy. The opening on top is large, so I would be very careful and never leave this unit unattended if one has little child of the kind that can get into trouble in split second.. Granted this is not a grinder, but I feel compelled to mention this - we all should know that little kids, active cell phones, laud TV’s and tired parents when all on can become potentially harmful combination.
In our testing, we focused on making green juice from 8 ounces each of curly kale and green grapes. This test showed us how each machine handled both soft fruit and tough greens. Fibrous greens are hard to break down, and a high-quality juicer will squeeze more juice from leaves than cheaper models. Soft fruit, like seedless grapes, is a challenge for juicers for the opposite reason—it lacks the fiber that helps the juicer pull the fruit completely through the chamber, and can gum up the works.
The juice extractor on the other hand is a device used to obtain juice from citrus fruits and vegetables where the pulp, seeds, and the skin is separated, for you to get only pure juice of the fruit or vegetable. It has blades to cut pieces of fruits that rotate or spin at a high speed to separate seeds and skin from the juice that is collected in a container.
Another important consideration is where you plan to store your juicer and how easily you’ll want to access it. While horizontal-masticating juicers can churn out high volumes of juice, you may not have space for them. Plus, they tend to weigh more so tend to be difficult to move from closet to counter. The small footprint of vertical juicers is ideal for smaller kitchens with limited counter space and can often tuck under cabinets. Lightweight centrifugal models are perfect if you need to move your juicer from storage space to counter. Just make sure whatever model you pick can handle the volume of juice you plan to make: smaller juicers equal smaller amounts of juice per batch.
It’s no secret that juicing is a fantastic and popular way to easily add more nutrients from fruits and vegetables into your diet. And regular visits to juice bars can really start to add up. Making your own juice at home is more cost effective, convenient, and lets you customize your blend. But choosing the best juicer can feel a little overwhelming. We’re here to help.
In researching this guide, we spoke to John Kohler of DiscountJuicers.com and Matt Shook of JuiceLand in Austin, Texas, to find out about leading juicers and to compare similar models. Though we don’t normally seek out retailers as experts to interview for our guides, John Kohler is different—we think he’s the most knowledgeable juicer on the Internet. He’s been juicing for 25 years, and his YouTube videos comparing and talking about juicers and juicing have over 27 million views. Wirecutter founder Brian Lam wrote the original juicer review for Wirecutter, using John’s knowledge as a guide. Because Kohler stocks all brands of juicers and his reviews are objective, we don’t think he’s biased toward any particular models.
A "smoking motor" is usually caused from binding between the cutting unit clutch and the cutting assembly which connects to the motor. Unplug the blender and allow to cool. Once the blender is cool, check the cutting assembly (see the Use and Care instructions for your model for a parts diagram) to see if the blades "spin freely." Be careful, the blades are sharp. If the blades do not spin freely, the cutting unit needs to be replaced. Once the blender base (without container) is cool, plug it in and turn it on to see if it works properly. (If the unit was not turned off when the cutting unit locked, the motor could be damaged.)
Of the two new juicers Omega introduced in 2017, the CUBE300S Juice Cube has the more unusual design. This horizontal single-auger juicer is designed to handle the same workload and produce the same results as our budget pick, the Omega J8004. In our research, we found that the much pricier Juice Cube didn’t produce a higher yield or have more practical features than the J8004.
Warranty: No matter what kind of juicer you're getting, you want it to last. You should always get small appliances with some level of warranty, but normally the longer the warranty, the better. Not only does it show that a company is confident in its product, but it also means that if something does break, you won't have to shell out any extra cash.
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